Diane S. Berry's research while affiliated with Southern Methodist University and other places

Publications (32)

Article
We conducted a comprehensive analysis of assortative mating (i.e., the similarity between wives and husbands on a given characteristic) in a newlywed sample. These newlyweds showed (a) strong similarity in age, religiousness, and political orientation; (b) moderate similarity in education and verbal intelligence; (c) modest similarity in values; an...
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Full-text available
Telling lies often requires creating a story about an experience or attitude that does not exist. As a result, false stories may be qualitatively different from true stories. The current project investigated the features of linguistic style that distinguish between true and false stories. In an analysis of five independent samples, a computer-based...
Article
Fifty-one previously unacquainted opposite-sex dyads were surreptitiously videotaped while participating in an initial six-min interaction. Participants subsequently described their feelings about the interaction and their partner. Observers later viewed the interactions and evaluated their quality. We examined the ability of participants' physical...
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This chapter reviews recent empirical advances that in turn explain origin of attractiveness preferences. It discusses several evolutionary models of human social behavior and their predictions regarding the function of attractiveness. It also evaluates the ability of these models to account for recent findings in the attractiveness literature. Fur...
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The emphasis on individual differences in evolutionary theories is important and has not received adequate attention. Strategic Pluralism makes a major contribution by addressing these issues, but like other evolutionary models (e.g., game theory) does not articulate the specific mechanisms underlying strategy selection. Specification of such mecha...
Article
We examined the relations of affect and personality to qualitative aspects of young adults' friendships. Members of 131 friendship dyads evaluated the quality of their relationships and kept diaries of the conflicts they experienced during a 4-week period. Positive and negative affect (PA and NA) emerged as independent predictors of the extent to w...
Article
American folklore is filled with images of "typical" natives of different parts of the United States. However, there has been little empirical attention to the manner in which regional affiliation affects self or other judgments of personality. We describe 3 studies that represent the first systematic attempt to examine the impact of regional affil...
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Participants described their current and past romantic relationships on a variety of measures, as well as their typical behavioral responses to conflict in intimate relationships. Consistent with studies of initial social encounters, participants who were high in trait positive affect (PA) described their current relationships as being of higher qu...
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Full-text available
Target persons were videotaped while engaged in an interview. A text analysis program was used to ascertain the frequency with which they employed negative emotion words, positive emotion words, words reflecting cognitive operations, self-referents, presenttense verbs, negations, and unique words in their verbalizations. Judges viewed the videotape...
Article
This study examined the development of sensitivity to specific patterns of movement that reveal interpersonal events. Preschoolers and adults viewed an animated film created by Heider and Simmel (1944), and then answered a set of probe questions about traits, emotions, and relationships that characterized the geometric figures in the film. Five-yea...
Article
Two studies explored the relations of positive and negative affect (PA and NA) to social interaction. In Study 1, unacquainted dyads were surreptitiously videotaped as they participated in a 6-min interaction. Participants then evaluated the quality of the interaction. Independent observers also rated the videotaped interactions. Trait PA was posit...
Chapter
It has often been suggested that we make a life out of reading people’s faces. In recent years, researchers have demonstrated a growing interest in just how we accomplish this feat. In fact, publications in the area of face perception have increased by more than 3,000% during the past 2 decades (Ellis, 1981). One line of this research has utilized...
Article
Full-text available
Bond, Charles F; Berry, Diane S; Omar (Atoum), Adnan (1994). The kernel of truth in judgments of deceptiveness. Basic & Applied Social Psychology. Vol. 15(4), 523-534. This article describes an investigation of the relationship between appearance-based impressions of honesty and individuals' willingness to engage in deceptive behaviors. Neutral-e...
Article
The ecological-event-perception view of social knowing differs from the traditional cognitive approach to person perception in some fundamental ways. First, the ecological view holds that veridical information about people and their interactions is available in dynamic, ongoing stimulus events. Second, perception itself is conceptualized as a dynam...
Article
Audiotapes of the voices of77 preschool children were prepared. Subjects listened to the tapes, and then provided their impressions of the competence, leadership, dominance, warmth, and honesty of the children. Judgments of the voices' babyishness and attractiveness were also obtained. Perceivers reliably discriminated the children's voices along t...
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Children 3,4, and 5 years old provided free-response descriptions of one of four short video displays. These consisted of either the original Heider and Simmel (1944) animated film or one of three versions of the film that had been altered with a digital special-effects generator. In the altered versions, (a) dynamic aspects of the original film we...
Article
It is well documented that people form reliable and robust impressions of a stranger's personality traits on the basis of facial appearance. The propensity to judge character from the face is typically thought to reflect cultural beliefs about mythical relations between aspects of facial appearance and personality. However, cross-cultural and devel...
Article
The spontaneous nonverbal expression of emotion is related to immediate reductions in autonomic nervous system activity. Similar changes in specific autonomic channels occur when individuals are encouraged to verbally express their emotions. Indeed, these physiological changes are most likely to occur among individuals who are either verbally or no...
Article
Subjects viewed and wrote free response descriptions of one of four short video displays. These displays consisted of either the classic Heider and Simmel animated film or one of three versions of the film that had been altered with a digital special effects generator In these altered versions, either (a) dynamic aspects of the original film were d...
Article
Subjects rated the power, competence, warmth, and honesty of stimulus persons whose voices systematically and independently varied along the dimensions of vocal attractiveness and vocal maturity. The results revealed that the effects of vocal attractiveness on person perception can be attenuated or augmented by variations in vocal maturity; and tha...
Article
Sixty 5-year-olds and 120 adults participated in research that examined the development of sensitivity to gender information in patterns of facial motion. Subjects were asked to identify the gender of static or dynamic versions of point-light stimulus faces. The dynamic facial displays were filmed either while the stimulus recited the alphabet or w...
Article
Subjects provided their impressions of stimulus faces that systematically varied in attractiveness and babyishness. The results indicate that variations in facial babyishness can qualify the effects of attractiveness on social perception. For example facially attractive people are thought to be more honest, warm, and sincere than average when facia...
Article
The validity of social perceptions was assessed on the basis of facial or vocal information. Specifically, impressions of stimulus persons' power and warmth were obtained on the basis of either a facial photograph or a voice recording. These were compared with the stimulus persons' self-reports along the same dimensions. Face- and voice-based impre...
Article
In this paper, we describe a methodological alternative to the point-light display for the study of the impact of human movement on social perception. This quantization technique involves degrading standard videotapes via a special effects generator at the time of editing. As is the case with a point-light display, quantization disguises structural...
Article
Ratings of the attractiveness and babyishness of the voices of 124 stimulus persons were obtained. These were compared to impressions provided by judges on the basis of vocal information only; self-descriptions provided by the stimulus persons; and descriptions of the stimulus persons provided by close friends. The vocal attractiveness stereotype w...
Article
This research assessed the impact of facial motion on perceptions of age-related person qualities. Ss judged the power of point-light displays of the faces of children, middle-aged adults, and elderly adults. Ratings were obtained of (a) dynamic displays filmed while the stimulus persons were reciting the alphabet, (b) dynamic displays filmed, whil...
Article
Research has revealed that feature babyishness exerts a powerful impact on perceptions of faces. Whereas previous work has focused on the perceptual consequences of such variations in facial configuration, the present study examined the psychological ramifications of exhibiting a particular facial appearance. Specifically, we asked whether baby fac...
Article
Used a simulated trial format to assess the impact of facial maturity on social perceptions. 128 undergraduates read a pretrial intake report indicating that a male defendant had committed either a negligent or an intentional crime. Plea was varied by stating that the defendant had pleaded "guilty" or "not guilty" to the charge. Ss were more likely...
Article
Two studies investigated Korean college students' perceptions of babyfaced adults. The first study replicated McArthur and Apatow's (1983-1984) investigation of U.S. students' impressions of schematic adult male and female faces. The second study replicated Berry and McArthur's (1985) investigation of U.S. students' impressions of 20 young adult Ca...
Article
Despite considerable evidence indicating that our perceptions of people's psychological attributes are strongly tied to their facial appearance, there has been almost no systematic and theoretically guided research on this topic. The ecological approach to social perception (McArthur & Baron, 1983) holds that facial characteristics may influence im...
Article
Obtained physical measurements and subjective ratings from 80 undergraduates of various facial features for 20 adult male stimulus faces, and these faces were also rated on 5 personality dimensions, physical attractiveness, age, and "babyfacedness" by Ss, to investigate components and consequences of a babyface. The personality dimensions were desi...

Citations

... Sverker Runeson, Johansson's student, has extended the scope of the initial point-light studies of James Cutting and his colleagues by demonstrating that such properties as effort, strain and deceptive intention could be perceived in studies of both the lifting of weights and perception of gender (Runeson & Frykholm, 1983). Diane Berry has extended this work in an extensive programme of research including work on what she calls babyfaceishness , though here there is sometimes a return to the use of static stimulus displays (Berry, 1995; Berry & McArthur, 1986). Berry has also widened the range of methodologies employed by ecological researchers by developing the use of a digital editing technique called quantization, a subtractive technique that can be used with any video display. ...
... Different techniques have been proposed to solve this problem (cf. Bernieri et al., 1994), including the use of point light displays (Johansson, 1973(Johansson, , 1976 or video quantization techniques (Berry et al., 1991(Berry et al., , 1992. However, both methods display specific limitations. ...
... Women wearing more makeup were perceived as more attractive (Cash et al., 1989) Facially attractive people are thought to be honest, warm, sincere, and lower in power (Berry, 1991). However, highly attractive women were perceived as more interpersonally aggressive when made-up (Sulikowski et al., 2022). ...
... Indeed, drawings or photographs of faces with larger eyes are considered more attractive than faces with smaller eyes by adults. Remarkably, this is true across faces of different age, sex, and race (Horvath et al., 1987;Keating, 1985;McArthur & Apatow, 1983;McArthur & Berry, 1987;Sternglanz et al., 1977). Geldart et al. (1999), manipulated face's eye size of drawing and color photographs and examined the effects on adults' aesthetic ratings and 5-month-olds' looking times. ...
... The psychological salience and social significance of sex have inspired efforts to identify the visible cues that can be used by observers to judge anothers' sex. In relation to the face, these are manifold, and include: evaluations of metric differences between the shapes of male and female faces, and their links to behavioural performance (Burton et al., 1993;Gilani et al., 2014); tests of the signal value of specific face parts in isolation and in combination (Brown and Perrett, 1993;Faghel-Soubeyrand et al., 2019;Schyns et al., 2002;Yamaguchi et al., 2013); contributions from external features (Macrae and Martin, 2007); and signals found in texture, contrast, colour, and facial motion (Berry, 1991;Bruce and Langton, 1994;Hill et al., 1995;Nestor and Tarr, 2008;Russell, 2009). In the aggregate, these findings illustrate how richly sex is conveyed to observers over multiple facial dimensions. ...
... Perceiving movement from alive things is a very early form of perception that is already in place in very young children. One-year old children see geometric figures in experimental studies as intentional, based on how they move [90,91], and three to four-year-old children attribute desires, goals, and emotions to such geometric figures [92]. Animated perception is considered to be an early milestone in children's development [93], that contributes in an integrative way to the social information process and social cognition of children [94]. ...
... Auditory communication, or communication based on sound, is one of the most important forms of social interaction we use in our daily lives. Verbal or non-verbal, oral or non-oral, auditory communication is often dynamic and creative and depends upon sensitivity and spontaneous responsivity not only to detailed characteristics of sound, but also to social context, hierarchy and roles (Berry et al., 1997;Dijksterhuis and Bargh, 2001). Understanding the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying auditory communication is an important target of social neuroscience (see review by Liu et al., 2018). ...
... Some of the reviewed studies observe mature appearance to trait mappings in children as young as 3 (Ewing et al., 2019); and there is evidence that even seven-month-old infants show differential brain responses to faces varying in trustworthiness (Jessen & Grossmann, 2019). While trust impressions from faces are not always accurate, our impression formation system is likely built on an adaptive readiness to make judgements based on visual information gleaned from faces, which evolutionarily, revealed more proximate cues to others' intentions (Bond, Berry, & Omar, 1994;Kramer & Ward, 2010;Leivers et al., 2015). This heuristic system is especially important given environmental selection pressures that required us to quickly and efficiently determine whether those we interact with pose a threat to our survival (Oosterhof & Todorov, 2008;Zebrowitz & Zhang, 2009). ...
... In general, humans categorize others (i.e., estimate what "kind" of person another is, cf. Cantor & Mischel, 1979) and can estimate aspects of their personality (Kenny et al., 1994;Zebrowitz & Collins, 1997), sexual availability (Gangestad et al., 1992), or what they think or feel (Ickes et al., 1990) from photographs or brief videos (Berry & Misovich, 1994). Research on the so-called accuracy of social perception has primarily focused on aspects that are relevant for long-term human interaction (e.g., personality traits) or survival (e.g., sexual availability, social dominance, see Zebrowitz & Collins, 1997, for a good starting point on this topic). ...
... Further studies examining the relationship between self-reported personality traits, measured using questionnaires, and perceived personality traits, as rated from facial photographs, have found that observers can accurately perceive extraversion, agreeableness, emotional stability (Penton-Voak et al., 2006), openness, and neuroticism (Kramer & Ward, 2010). Likewise, personality traits that observers associated with babyfacedness (i.e., weakness and approachability) were also reported by individuals with higher levels of babyfacedness (Berry & Brownlow, 1989;Paunonen et al., 1999). Recently, analyses of 3D facial scans have shown that some aspects of facial shape are predictive of personality traits (Hu et al., 2017;Jones et al., 2012). ...