Diana Liverman's research while affiliated with The University of Arizona and other places

Publications (6)

Article
Full-text available
As human activity threatens to make the planet unsafe for humanity and other life forms, scholars are identifying planetary targets set at a safe distance from biophysical thresholds beyond which critical Earth systems may collapse. Yet despite the profound implications that both meeting and transgressing such targets may have for human wellbeing,...
Article
Full-text available
Keeping the Earth system in a stable and resilient state, to safeguard Earth's life support systems while ensuring that Earth's benefits, risks, and related responsibilities are equitably shared, constitutes the grand challenge for human development in the Anthropocene. Here, we describe a framework that the recently formed Earth Commission will us...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the “climate gap” in the Southwest US (Arizona and New Mexico), referring to the “disproportionate and unequal implications of climate change and climate change mitigation” for “people of color and the poor” [Shonkoff, S.B., et al., 2011. The climate gap: environmental health and equity implications of climate change mitigatio...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes the findings of a novel participatory geographic information systems (PGISs) methodology designed to support vulnerability and disaster risk management (DRM) efforts in small Caribbean communities. The methodology combines community vulnerability mapping with geo-referenced household data through a step-by-step approach to reco...
Article
Full-text available
The development of human civilisations has occurred at a time of stable climate. This climate stability is now threatened by human activity. The rising global climate risk occurs at a decisive moment for world development. World nations are currently discussing a global development agenda consequent to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which...

Citations

... These proposals reflect a more general uneasiness concerning classical liberal theories of justice on the grounds that these theories do not acknowledge how social institutions fail to offer a level playing field for all (Agyeman et al., 2016;Shi et al., 2016, p. 132). Based on these concerns, various analysts have proposed that a more just approach to adaptation should focus upon the experiences of marginalized groups in the face of global atmospheric change (Gupta et al., 2021;Holland, 2017;Newell et al., 2021), as well as seeking ways to adopt forms of knowledge co-production to increase the participation of these groups in adaptation planning and implementation (Chakraborty et al., 2022;Eriksen et al., 2021;Inderberg et al., 2015). ...
... The Science Based Targets Network is working on guidance for business with "measurable, actionable, and time-bound objectives, based on the best available science that allow actors to align with Earth's limits and societal sustainability goals" [258]. The Earth Commission is assessing what a safe and just corridor for human development means [259]. This report aims to look at what applying a planetary boundary framework could imply for forests and wood consumption levels. ...
... A final example is from a study by Wilder, et al. [80]. Using a mixed methods approach for examining inequalities associated with climate change and climate policies in Southwestern USA (i.e., Arizona and New Mexico), they represent this problematization in relation to climate risks in inland states, such as heatwaves and droughts. ...
... To reduce the consequences of climate change, the approaches of sustainable development would be beneficial for the globe and moreover, it can be adapted as early as possible because it is considered as a long, slow, and efficient process. Therefore, planning of their adaptation is more important to develop joint venture of climate-land-water strategies to produce food and water for our future generations (Rockström et al. 2014). Some approaches (climate-resilient practices) are well described in many research documents to deal with the changes in climatic conditions which include (Fig. 5): ...
... Several studies have focused on deliberate efforts to incorporate and integrate community risk perceptions and local spatial knowledge into geospatial technologysuch as Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) -to create hazard maps, vulnerability indices, and resilience assessments (see [58,66,72,73,[120][121][122][123][124][125][126][127][128][129][130][131][132][133][134][135][136]). Other means of integration happen in post-disaster reconstruction where traditionally built structures are strengthened with engineering interventions. ...