Deniz Yucel's research while affiliated with William Paterson University and other places

Publications (35)

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This study examines the underexplored relationship between union type and mental health for married, cohabiting, and living apart together (“LAT”) individuals. Further, we assess whether gender and age moderate (separately and jointly) this relationship. Using data from Wave 1 of the Generations and Gender Survey ( N = 34,833), results suggest that...
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Objective: This study tests the effects of work-family conflict, in both directions, on partners' agreement on fertility preferences among dual-earner couples, as well as whether this relationship varies by women's employment status. Background: Few studies have examined the relationship between work-family conflict and fertility preferences. Give...
Article
This study contributes to the existing literature by testing the longitudinal effects of both types of work–family conflict (i.e., work-to-family conflict [WTFC] and family-to-work conflict [FTWC]) on depressive symptoms, using data from three waves of the German Family Panel (pairfam) survey collected over a four-year period. Using responses from...
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Previous studies have shown that societal norms around gender roles can shape gender-based outcomes of working from home. This paper extends these findings to see how individuals’ gender role attitudes can moderate the relationship between working from home and work–family conflict, but again with varying outcomes for men and women. We use data fro...
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In post-conflict and segregated societies, overcoming high prejudice between groups is essential for peaceful coexistence. In this paper, we explore the roles of direct contact (face-to-face contact and cross-group friendship) and indirect contact (extended cross-group friendship) in reducing prejudice between Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots li...
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Using 509 mother/father–child dyads drawn from Wave 8 of The German Family Panel (pairfam), this study examines the direct effects of mothers’ and fathers’ work–family conflict (WFC) on children’s internalizing (emotional) and externalizing (conduct) problem behaviors. We also test whether these effects are moderated by several child characteristic...
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The purpose of this paper is to test a typology of work–family balance and explore its effect on job satisfaction, as well as to test whether different sources of social support moderate this effect. The paper uses quantitative data on professionals and managers from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce Survey (N = 1120). Latent Class...
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This study examines dual-earner couples to determine whether changes in work–family conflict predict changes in one’s own (i.e., actor effects) or partner’s (i.e., partner effects) health and well-being as well as gender differences in these relationships. Using data from 1,001 dual-earner couples in Wave 6 and Wave 8 of the German Family Panel sur...
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One of the major challenges in divided societies is finding ways to overcome geographical partition by increasing readiness for cohabitation in mixed areas. Cyprus has faced a protracted situation of division (between Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots) for the last 44 years. In this paper, we explore the role of intergroup contact (both quantity...
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The present study uses Wave 8 of the German Family Panel to test the spillover and crossover effects of work-family conflict on job satisfaction, relationship satisfaction, and mental health for individuals (actor effects) as well as their spouses/partners (partner effects) in dual-earning couples. We further contribute by assessing whether the res...
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Previous scholarship has highlighted how work–family conflict (work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict) and job insecurity interfere with health outcomes. Little work, however, considers how these stressors jointly influence health among workers. Informed by the stress process model, the current study examines whether job insecurity mod...
Article
Using data on employees from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW), this study tests the effects of work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict (WTFC and FTWC, respectively) on job satisfaction and work engagement. Moreover, using the job demands-resources (JDR) model, this study evaluates whether job autonomy and schedul...
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Using data from 501 married individuals living in Northern Cyprus, an understudied context, this study tests the effect of intimate partner violence (specifically, verbal and physical spousal aggression) on marital satisfaction. In particular, this study explores whether marital communication mediates the effects of verbal and physical spousal aggr...
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Several recent studies suggest that individuals exhibit better social skills if raised with siblings. This pattern has been demonstrated among kindergartners and adults, but oddly is inconsistent among adolescents. Analyzing 1662 youths from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we replicate what others have found—no as...
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This article sheds new light on the role played by perceived fairness in configuring the relationship between gendered housework division and women’s family life satisfaction across 30 countries. This is achieved by distinguishing and comparing two major dimensions of women’s fairness comparison—inter-gender relational comparison between partners a...
Article
Applying the stress-divorce model to explain the impact of spillover stress, this study analyzes 1,961 married participants in the National Study of the Changing Workforce. Specifically, it tests the individual and combined effects of work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict, work-to-family enrichment, and family-to-work enrichment on marit...
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Using data from the 2010 Married and Cohabiting Couples survey, this study tests the correlates of relationship satisfaction among 752 married couples and 323 cohabiting couples, using the social exchange framework and the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM). Specifically, it considers how conflict in work-family balance, fairness in the div...
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Workplace support has been consistently identified as an important factor shaping the well-being of workers. This study adds to the existing literature by considering how three central facets of workplace support—coworker support, supervisor support, and organizational support—relate to the life satisfaction of US workers. Additionally, we examine...
Article
Work-to-family conflict has been consistently found to be one of the factors impacting workers’ life satisfaction. Prior research has also highlighted how type of employment (self-employed versus employee) impacts life satisfaction. No prior research, however, has examined how type of employment moderates the association between work-to-family conf...
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This study analyzes 2,617 10–15 year olds surveyed in wave 1 of the United Kingdom Household Longitudinal Study (UKHLS). Specifically, it tests the associations of three variables with life satisfaction among early adolescents: parent–child relationship quality, being a perpetrator or victim of sibling bullying, and being a perpetrator or victim of...
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Erratum to: Child Ind Res (2014)DOI 10.1007/s12187-014-9276-0The published article unfortunately contained errors in Tables 1 and 3. These tables are corrected as follows:
Article
This paper explores the correlates of attitudes toward marriage and children in North Cyprus, South Cyprus, Turkey and Greece, using the most recent wave of the European Values Study (EVS) data. The results show the most support for the second demographic transition theory. The combined effects of education, religiosity, political ideology and gend...
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This main aim of this paper is to evaluate the predictors of marital instability among married individuals living in Northern Cyprus, by focusing on socio-economic, attitudinal, psychological, and relationship-specific factors. To fulfill this goal, the study analyzes survey data from 496 married individuals living in the major cities of Northern C...
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A growing body of research suggests that individuals raised with siblings gain social skills that facilitate relationship building with others. But while this pattern has been demonstrated among kindergartners and adults, surprisingly it does not replicate among adolescents. We analyze 4188 10–15 years olds from the United Kingdom Household Longitu...
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Using the most recent wave of European Values Survey (EVS) data, this study explores the correlates of generalized trust by comparing Turkish and Greek communities living on the island of Cyprus. The results suggest that, besides confidence in institutions, there are different determinants of trust for each Cypriot community. In comparing Greek and...
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This paper analyzes the effects of different dimensions of religiosity and trust on religious and racial prejudice in Europe. The sample is based on 37 European countries that are current or potential members of the European Union (EU). Using multi-level logistic regression modeling and the latest wave from the European Values Study data, we test t...
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While demographers have long been concerned with population increases, recent significant declines in fertility also warrant concern. So far, however, most researchers have focused on the causes of lower fertility rather than its consequences. This study makes a theoretical contribution by proposing a new conceptual framework, which suggests that g...
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Most prior sociological research on siblings explores their effects on educational, cognitive and social outcomes. This study focuses on personality traits and extends its scope to early adolescence. Using the eighth-grade data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K), it tests the relationship between number of sibl...
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Most prior research on siblings has focused on the quantity of siblings, and explored siblings’ effects on educational and cognitive outcomes. In this study, we analyze data on around 4,000 10-15 years olds from the United Kingdom Household Longitudinal Study (UKHLS) to test the effects of sibship size, child-sibling relationship quality, and other...
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Most research on the consequences of the number of siblings highlights their downside—the negative association between sibship size and educational outcomes. But recently scholars have begun to understand the potential benefits of siblings, with some research indicating that kindergartners are more socially adept when they have at least one brother...
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While demographers have long been concerned with population increases, recent significant declines in fertility also warrant concern. However, most researchers to date have focused on the causes of lower fertility rather than its consequences. Using General Social Survey (GSS) data, I tested the relationship between sibship size and generalized tru...
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In this article, I ask: Does the effect of wives' work hours on marital dissolution change across marital duration? Using the first two waves of the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH), I find only weak evidence that wives' work hours are associated with higher marital dissolution. The effect, however, is more positive and significant...
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This study examines both the mediating effects of marital interaction and gender ideology, as well as the moderating effect of gender ideology in understanding the relationship between wives' work hours and marital dissolution. This paper also explores the role of gender for couples who disagree in their relation-ship assessments. Wives' additional...
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Large surveys tend to be strong on reliability and generalizability but weak on validity. The recently collected Early Childhood Longitudinal Study—Birth Cohort, a large and representative sample of over 10,000 infants assessed at 9 and 24 months, took a provocative step toward trying to improve the validity of measures of infants’ environmental co...
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Using the Interpersonal Exchange Model of Sexual Satisfaction, we consider how infidelity, pornography consumption, marital satisfaction, sexual frequency, premarital sex, and cohabitation are associated with married couples’ sexual satisfaction. Data from 433 couples are analyzed with structural equation models to determine the contributions of (a...

Citations

... An individuals' WtoFC may also alter the person's relationship quality with their partner and children (ten Brummelhuis and Bakker, 2012). Studies on WtoFC in different-sex dual-earner couples have reported crossover effects from one partner's WtoFC to the other's well-being or domain or life satisfaction (Lu et al., 2016;Yucel and Latshaw, 2020a). Other studies have examined crossover effects in parent-child dyads. ...
... Top-5-ranked papers γ 7. Quality of Working Life (QWL) Different types of work-family balance, social support, and job satisfaction: A latent class analysis (Yucel, 2020) 93.35% ...
... Many studies focused on the impact of work stress on the health of individual employees (see (22)). Numerous studies investigated detrimental effects on somatic health (cardiovascular diseases, (23,24); coronary heart disease, (25)). ...
... Also when exploring at the same time majority and minority group members (Al Ramiah & Hewstone, 2012;Árnadóttir, Lolliot, Brown, & Hewstone, 2018;Binder et al., 2009;Lutterbach & Beelmann, 2020;Tropp, 2007;Yucel & Psaltis, 2020), research has mainly focused on the mediational role of the affective component of prejudice (Islam & Hewstone, 1993;Stephan & Stephan, 2000;Tropp & Pettigrew, 2005a). In a work context, the cognitive dimensions of prejudice, which fewer empirical studies have examined (Brambilla, Hewstone, & Colucci, 2013;Gaunt, 2011;Kotzur, Schäfer, & Wagner, 2019), are probably more relevant than affective mediators. ...
... SCM has been used to study work-family conflict 8 , while the spillover-crossover of positive experiences has received less attention 9 , and even more scarcely in the food domain 6 . Moreover, most studies on SCM have focused on couples, with fewer studies assessing crossover effects between parents and their children 9 . ...
... Job autonomy and schedule flexibility as moderators of the relationship between work-family conflict and work-related outcomes (Yucel, 2018) 91.72% ...
... Notably, our results reported that the male's level of disorganized attachment was significantly higher than those of females, which may be related to the social norms and expectations. Based on traditional social expectations, males are expected to demonstrate bravery and independence more than females (Yucel, 2018). When males are abused in childhood and adolescence, they may shy away from expressing their vulnerabilities and emotions and thus adopt disorganized attachment patterns such as approach-avoidance strategies (Yucel, 2018). ...
... For women, the majority of evidence suggests that the perception that the division of housework is unfair to oneself is associated with lower relationship satisfaction compared to perceptions that the division of housework is fair to both partners or unfair to one's partner. In addition, increases in male partners' proportionate shares of housework are associated with increases in women's relationship satisfaction (Baxter & Western, 1998;Charbonneau et al., 2019;Hu & Yucel, 2018;Lennon & Rosenfield, 1994;Ruppanner et al., 2018). ...
... The SPT acknowledges the social and cultural context of stressors, as well as the individual level manifestations and mediators of stress. This offers an appropriate model to account for the complex interaction between stress and farmer health and wellbeing (Minnotte and Yucel 2018). ...
... According to a study on health balance, the balance between work and family is not absolute because health represents perceived ability as one has to perform multiple roles in the work and family domains (Gragnano, Simbula, & Miglioretti, 2020). Other studies showed that mental and physical health mediated fully work-to-family conflict while partially mediating work-to-family enrichment (Yucel, 2017). The success of an organization in enhancing job satisfaction correlates significantly with organizational productivity (Lee & Lee, 2019). ...