Denise Hooks-Anderson's research while affiliated with Washington University in St. Louis and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine if race disparities in glycemic control differ in young vs older white and African American patients with diabetes. Methods: Electronic medical record data were gathered from 1431 primary care patients ≥18 years old, diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, who had ≥2 A1C measurements between July 1, 200...
Article
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Background: Fast glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline is associated with adverse outcomes, but the associated risk factors among patients without chronic kidney disease (CKD) are not well defined. Methods: From a primary care registry of 37,796, we identified 2219 (6%) adults with at least three estimated (e)GFR values and a baseline eGFR be...
Article
Background: Previous evidence of race disparities in smoking cessation treatment has been limited to mostly survey studies which increase the potential for recall bias. We examined if African American versus white patients in primary care are less likely to receive any treatment or if race disparities are specific to the type of treatment offered...
Article
Introduction.: Late nephrology referral is associated with adverse outcomes especially among minorities. Research on the association of the rate of chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression with nephrology referral in white versus black patients is lacking. Objectives.: Compute the odds of nephrology referral in primary care and their association...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The medical home model has been gaining attention from the health care community as a strategy for improved outcomes for management of chronic disease, including diabetes. The purpose of this study was to compare referrals for diabetes education among patients receiving care from a medical home model versus a traditional practice. Met...
Article
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The purpose of the study was to determine whether there are any race-related disparities in the prevalence of provisions for diabetes education in primary care clinics for patients with diabetes and prediabetes. A retrospective cross-sectional study of 3967 patients aged 14 to >89 years with prediabetes and diabetes. Medical record data from patien...

Citations

... According to the fundamental cause theory, race/ethnicity matters for health because it exerts cumulative effects on exposure to health-promoting resources and health-detrimental risks along both material and psychosocial lines. 3,4 Previous study on racial disparities in T2D supports these connections. One study demonstrates that socioeconomic status explains *22% of racial disparities in T2D prevalence. ...
... These included demographic factors including age [38], race [39], ethnicity [40], sex [41], and educational level [42]. The co-morbidities included diabetes [43], hypertension [44], obesity (measured via mean body mass index [BMI]) [45], cardiovascular disease [46] and stroke [47]. In addition we also included psychosocial conditions like depression [14], smoking [48] and alcohol abuse [49]. ...
... Cigarette use among African Americans not only contributes to poor well-being and health status, but increases the burden of tobacco-related diseases [19]. Future interventions should focus on successful culturally-tailored smoking cessation programs and strategies for older African Americans, including both pharmacological aids and specialized counseling [75]. Special attention should center on increasing the health literacy of these adults, with specific strategies for those with failed attempts at smoking cessation, and those reporting poor physical and mental health [76,77]. ...
... When a patient is diagnosed with kidney failure, they are often referred to a nephrologist who will prescribe medications and develop a plan to take care of the diagnosis of kidney failure. The idea is that the earlier a patient with decreasing function is referred to a nephrologist, there is a "reduced mortality rate and progression of kidney disease" [9]. In a study measuring the rate of renal function decline, race, and referral in primary care patients, Koraishy et al. [9] determined "those with fast CKD progression are more likely to be referred to nephrologists than slow progressors; however, a majority of patients are not referred." ...
... The creation of this retrospective cohort and its use for primary care research were approved by the SLU Institutional Review Board. Additional PCPD Registry details have been previously reported [15][16][17][18][19]. ...
... Demographic differences in the assignment of a prediabetes diagnosis may reflect broad health equity and contextual factors 34,35,36 . There are many provider specific and system-level contextual factors that may influence clinical practice, including support and uptake of the recommended practice guidelines within each health system 37 . ...