Debra Javeline's research while affiliated with University of Notre Dame and other places

Publications (26)

Article
Full-text available
Previous research demonstrates that low-income countries face higher risks than high-income countries from toxic pollution and climate change. However, the relationship between these two risks is little explored or tested, and efforts to address the risks are often independent and uncoordinated. We argue that the global risks from toxic pollution a...
Article
In the past five years, the funding environment for nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) and social projects in Russia has changed dramatically. The most publicised developments involve government actions to restrict funding by Western donors. Less documented has been the transformation of the indigenous funding environment for civil society and ho...
Article
Full-text available
Public attitudes toward climate change are the subject of considerable study. An essential and understudied question is whether these attitudes influence public behavior. We answer this question with respect to a particular behavior, action to protect coastal homes from the increasing risk of hurricanes and rising seas. Coastal homeowner behavior i...
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As climate changes, coastal homeowners are potentially crucial actors in reducing the risks to property and human life from rising seas and increased hurricane activity. Absent strict, enforceable regulations mandating retrofitting of existing homes or major changes in homeowner insurance requirements, coastal resilience in a changing climate will...
Chapter
This chapter describes the multiple dimensions of sensitivity, which result in theoretical confusion, terminology confusion, and difficulties in designing survey instruments and interpreting empirical data. Before addressing the problems posed by sensitive topics and sensitive survey questions, researchers should be aware of the nature and level of...
Article
Greening the Globe: World Society and Environmental Change. By Hironaka Ann . New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014. 216p. $110.00 cloth, $28.99 paper. - Volume 14 Issue 2 - Debra Javeline
Article
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Despite projections of biodiversity loss and proposed adaptations to climate change, few data exist on the feasibility and effectiveness of adaptation strategies in minimizing biodiversity loss. Given the urgent need for action, scientific experts can fill critical information gaps by providing rapid and discerning risk assessment. A survey of 2,32...
Article
Few, if any, political scientists currently study climate change adaptation or are even aware that there is a large and growing interdisciplinary field of study devoted not just to mitigating greenhouse gas emissions but to reducing our vulnerability to the now-inevitable impacts of climate change. The lack of political science expertise and resear...
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Considerable uncertainty surrounds projections of climate change and its ecological consequences. We surveyed 2329 environmental biologists and found that greater expertise is associated with projections of greater climatic change and more severe consequences. The opinions of scientists with greater expertise converge, and they expect larger temper...
Article
The urgent need for policy decisions often outpaces scientific discovery. At such times, policymakers must rely on scientific opinion. This is the case with many aspects of current climate policy, especially those involving untested but potentially necessary adaptations to reduce vulnerability to climate change. Unfortunately, scientific opinion is...
Article
Public support for minority rights plays an important role in minorities actually securing and protecting those rights. In countries where public support for minority rights is low, how can attitudes be changed? Using data from two surveys of more than 6,000 Russians each, we show that institutions have the potential to persuade about a quarter of...
Article
Full-text available
Managed relocation is defined as the movement of species, populations, or genotypes to places outside the areas of their historical distributions to maintain biological diversity or ecosystem functioning with changing climate. It has been claimed that a major extinction event is under way and that climate change is increasing its severity Projectio...
Article
Can civic and political participation influence health outcomes, and if so, does the general aversion to joining community activities have some connection to poor health outcomes in Russia? Using data from surveys of 18,000+ urban Russians conducted from 2003 to 2005 and controlling for a wide range of variables, we find that individuals who join c...
Article
The horrific 2004 hostage taking in Beslan, North Ossetia, was widely expected to provoke retaliatory violence by ethnic Ossetians against ethnic Ingush and Chechens. The peaceful political activism that ensued suggests a key to breaking the cycle of ethnic violence.
Article
Courts that perform well are the cornerstone of the rule of law and democratic development. When courts are perceived as legalistic, fair, impartial, and independent of the influence of extrajudicial actors, aggrieved individuals are more likely to pursue litigation over other, potentially unlawful, alternatives. Using original data from surveys of...
Article
Given the centralization of power in contemporary Russia, can nonexecutive institutions exercise some power, especially institutions such as high courts, which are critical to establishing the rule of law? In particular, can high courts influence the Russian public through their power to persuade? Using experiments embedded in three surveys of more...
Article
Courts can better protect rights when citizens are willing and able to litigate in response to government abuses of power. However, if people are not socialized to the possibility of litigating against governments, why do some individuals decide to litigate? Using an original survey of victims in the Moscow theater hostage incident, we find that li...
Article
Protest and the Politics of Blame: The Russian Response to Unpaid Wages. By Debra Javeline. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2003. 312p. $60.00. Why, in the face of massive delays in the payment of wages throughout the Russian Federation during the 1990s, did so few Russian workers engage in organized protest? This empirical puzzle has impo...
Article
Blame plays an important role in motivating many human activities, but rarely has the attribution of blame been analyzed for its effects on protest behavior. I argue that how people understand causal relationships and attribute blame for a grievance plays a crucial role in their decision to redress the grievance through protest. The greater the spe...
Article
Some individuals may be predisposed to agree or acquiesce more than others. If the predisposition is cultural, then studies of public attitudes that rely on questions with agree-disagree response sets may mistake response effects for substantive differences among ethnic groups. In this study, I report the results of six experiments in question form...
Article
We thank the NSF for making this research possible (SGER SES-0317122) and Paul Wahlbeck for his helpful advice and assistance. For thoughtful and energetic collaboration, we thank the Institute for Comparative Social Research (CESSI) in Moscow and especially Anna Andreenkova. For valuable research assistance, we thank Mariam Stepanyan. For helpful...

Citations

... However, these studies have mainly been conducted in developed regions, where air pollution levels and population characteristics are distinct from the LMICs in Africa. Furthermore, different sources and compositions of PM 2.5 and weather conditions may also contribute to this heterogeneity in estimates (Marcantonio et al. 2021). Therefore, there is a need to explore how the associations of PM 2.5 with birth outcomes vary in African countries. ...
... We need more explicit formal models that examine how beliefs about climate change translate into action. In many cases, the most effective interventions might completely bypass beliefs and operate directly on behavior (e.g., social norms), especially as research has found that climate beliefs do not always correlate with climate action [56]. In this way, norms, choice architecture, elite cues, and subtle nudges might be modified to alter behavior. ...
... Climate change is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of some types of hazards (e.g., floods) in WA and other coastal regions (Birkmann and von Teichman 2010;Huppert et al. 2009;Miller et al. 2013), and adaptation is often limited due to insufficient funding (USGCRP 2018) and other factors, such as policy and institutional constraints (Bierbaum et al. 2013;Javeline et al. 2019). In the United States, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which oversees hazard mitigation planning, requires state-level HMPs to address "challenges posed by climate change, such as more intense storms, frequent heavy precipitation, heat waves, drought, extreme flooding, and higher sea levels" (FEMA 2015, p. 13). ...
... However, some researchers have documented that resource limitations are not the sole or primary reason homeowners or builders choose not to mitigate hazards. For example, a study of coastal homeowners in North Carolina found that perceived costs of mitigation measures did not fully explain why individuals chose not to reduce their house's structural vulnerabilities in future hurricanes [9]. Javeline and Kijewski-Correa [9] call for future research to investigate the perceived cost, demographic, and informational factors that are influencing whether homeowners increase their housing safety. ...
... Hällfors et al., 2017, Skikne et al., 2020. Recently, more biodiversity experts view this strategy as justifiable under certain circumstances (with highest confidence for woody plants, terrestrial insects and mammals) (Javeline et al., 2015). Despite a current lack of adoption in most current conservation practice (Aitken and Bemmels 2015, Hewitt et al., 2011), some practitioners and funders see a potential role for the strategy in conservation planning (Ogden and Innes, 2007;Reside et al., 2018;Karasov-Olson et al., 2021). ...
... Doing so circumvents deeper social questions such as inequality, which may also hang together with climate adaptation (Hjerpe et al., 2014;Remling, 2018). On the other hand, adaptation is arguably deeply political and susceptible to many distributional issues and conflicts (Javeline, 2014). It may, for example, induce politicians to prefer more visible (hard) adaptation projects, such as damns and sea walls, as well as reactive policies in search of political payoffs (Dolšak & Prakash, 2018). ...
... An annual report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2014) identified that 1983-2012 was likely the warmest period during the last 1400 years, and the land surface temperature increased by 0.85 • C during the period 1880-2012. This could threaten the stability of agricultural production, especially food production (Batool et al., 2019), and ultimately lead to imbalances in global food supply and demand (Hanjra and Qureshi, 2010;Javeline et al., 2013). In fact, crops are directly dependent on natural resources such as light, heat, water and soil, which are sensitive to climate change (Altman et al., 1998). ...
... We examine various aspects of the debate using a questionnaire survey that was specifically designed to this end. In general terms, our approach is inspired by Javeline and Shufeldt (2014) who have recently called attention to the role of "scientific opinion" in policy making. They argued that scientific opinion can be measured by systematic surveys employing similar quality standards as public opinion surveys. ...
... HCV is an especially "hard case" for legal mobilization due to the stigma attached to it and the challenges of living with a disease that requires expensive and time-consuming treatment. Third, although some studies have analyzed what factors shape people's initial decisions to sue (e.g., Javeline & Baird, 2007;Vanhala, 2018a) and judicial outcomes, fewer have examined determinants of plaintiffs' involvement in the intermediate stages. In particular, privacy protections for plaintiffs have been overlooked as part of the "legal opportunity structure" that shapes plaintiffs' decisions about how to get involved inside and outside the courtroom (Andersen, 2006;Hilson, 2002). ...
... The only known exceptions to this American centrism of the research is the illuminating experimental study of the effects of Russian high courts (Baird and Javeline 2007); the media content analysis of a ground-breaking decision of the Colombian Constitutional Court (Rodríguez-Garavito and Rodríguez-Franco 2015); a more controversial experimental study in South Africa (Gibson and Gouw 2003); 4 and two studies on the effects of the ground-breaking indigenous rights Mabo judgment in Australia (Myers and Sheehan 2009;Marks and McDonell 1996). This paper sets out to advance the current research frontier by examine the effects of international court (the European Court of Human Rights) and a foreign court (here, the Supreme Court of Canada). ...