Deborah D Danner's research while affiliated with University of Kentucky and other places

Publications (21)

Article
Successful African American recruitment for aging research requires sensitivity to factors that influence participation. In this work, a structured face-to-face educational interview was used to recruit African Americans for a longitudinal aging study and to collect information about attitudes related to research. The interview was designed to buil...
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Cognitively intact elderly research volunteers at the University of Kentucky have been recruited, followed longitudinally, and autopsied with extensive neuropathological evaluations since 1989. To date, the cohort has recruited 1,030 individuals with 552 participants being actively followed, 363 deceased, and 273 autopsied. An extensive database ha...
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Full-text available
Historically, minority groups have been underrepresented in research and clinical trials. The lack of participation by minorities has been attributed to a variety of factors including a mistrust of the predominately white research establishments and a lack of education about the purpose of research. The current study was designed to determine Afric...
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Inefficient and delayed recruitment into clinical trials in Alzheimer disease are major obstacles impeding progress in the discovery of more effective therapeutic strategies to combat this disease. Despite widespread recognition of this problem, limited empirical data demonstrating the effectiveness of specific recruitment strategies are available...
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Despite the significance of an early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), African Americans are diagnosed in later stages of the disease and present with greater cognitive impairment at the time of diagnosis when compared to Euro-Americans. To this end, there exists a paucity of research on diagnostic pathways among African Americans with dementi...
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To compare assessments of the decisional capacity of cognitively impaired patients by research assistants (RAs) and by family caregiver/proxies and to determine whether either or both groups judge capacity differently depending on the specific (hypothetical) research enrollment decision being made. Cross-sectional. Three clinics, one each in Ohio,...
Article
Kentucky's African-American Dementia Outreach Partnership (AADOP) has shown that African-American patients seek dementia care if a clinic is conveniently located and families are educated about the distinction between normal aging and signs of disease. The early identification of dementia allows African Americans access to pharmaceutic treatments t...
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To investigate the general awareness of cognitive impairment in persons with documented dementia, evaluate the subject's recall of a diagnostic disclosure from a physician and their recollection of the discussion, and determine whether this awareness of cognitive impairment or the recall of diagnostic disclosure is associated with poorer self-rated...
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To evaluate a research advance directive for persons with established dementia diagnoses and their family caregivers or proxies. Prospective randomized, controlled trial. Three clinics, one each in Ohio, Kentucky, and Illinois. At the end of separate interviews about enrollment choices in five types of hypothetical research projects, 149 persons wi...
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Full-text available
To examine one model of research advance directive as a possible way to reduce the mismatch between patient and proxy choices and also to learn more about how patients with mild to moderate dementia may want to keep decision making or cede it to their proxies in the future. Separate interviews were conducted with 149 dyads of dementia patients and...
Article
Handwritten autobiographies from 180 Catholic nuns, composed when participants were a mean age of 22 years, were scored for emotional content and related to survival during ages 75 to 95. A strong inverse association was found between positive emotional content in these writings and risk of mortality in late life (p < .001). As the quartile ranking...
Article
Handwritten autobiographies from 180 Catholic nuns, composed when participants were a mean age of 22 years, were scored for emotional content and related to survival during ages 75 to 95. A strong inverse association was found between positive emotional content in these writings and risk of mortality in late life (p < .001). As the quartile ranking...

Citations

... Accordingly, it could also be that PHC triggers stress and negative emotions. To exclude this argument, we referred to longitudinal and experimental studies that support the direction we assumed in our study (Danner et al., 2001;Kao et al., 2005;Niles & O'Donovan, 2019;Rein et al., 1995). Almost all coefficients proved to be relatively low, especially the effects of emotions on PHC in model 2 ( Figure 4). ...
... Many are simply overwhelmed by the flood of information or are cognitively impaired (which is not always obvious at the consultation). To give consent, patients must have legal and clinical capacity (47)(48)(49)(50). Doctors who wish to receive informed consent must be able to provide qualified information and to provide comprehensive information on both the risks and benefits of the intervention and to answer appropriate questions. ...
... Only two cross-sectional studies [33,36] used theoretical frameworks: a modified version of the Integrated Behavior Model [36], and a conceptual framework were developed based on the attitude theories focusing on stigma beliefs and subjective norms of AD care among Korean Americans [33]. Two qualitative [43,45] and one mixed-methods [39] studies used health belief models or a health-seeking model to explore the perception of dementia screening and to explain the rationale for dementia screening-seeking behaviors among ethnically diverse patients, family caregivers, and stakeholders. According to the Kaleidoscope Model of Health Communication, Garcia and others' study [47] looked at health communication between HCPs and French-speaking patients, especially people with dementia who reverted to their primary languages among Francophones. ...
... Negative feelings and uncertainties can be changed by information given by donation teams at this stage of the approach 88 . Additionally, the initial inclination to instinctively recoil from the matter and decline may be mitigated by allowing for an examination of their underlying motives and drives 87 . ...
... Study participants were drawn from the University of Kentucky Alzheimer's Research Disease Center (UK-ADRC) longitudinal cohort [13]. Included individuals had antemortem diagnosis of MCI or dementia and Gilliam Autism Rating Scale, 2nd edition (GARS-2) score data. ...
... Previous studies have identified factors associated with agreeing to brain donation among diverse older adults, predominantly older African Americans, largely using qualitative research methods such as focus groups. 2,[7][8][9][10]13,14 Qualitative research the cooperation of others, such as family members, remains instrumental for successful or completed brain autopsies. Given the well-documented salient role of family among diverse older adults, family members and other factors may serve as potential impediments to completed brain autopsies for these populations who have agreed to brain donation. ...
... Recruitment of the AD population and enrollment in an RCT requires an advocate to help with the Informed Consent process, thus you are "enrolling" two people and not one. The advocate often works and has a schedule which dictates the hours of operation to complete the RCT, and has influence over medical care decisions during the trial [61][62][63]. Recruitment strategies have been implemented to increase RCT enrollment from this population, and include PCP involvement, public awareness campaigns, improved access to trials and studies, better design of documents, increased funding, and more lax exclusion criteria so as not to exclude co-morbidities and drug usage that are higher in this vulnerable population [61][62][63][64]. ...
... Another approach to capacity assessments is to ask family members or carers to report on patient capabilities. Although this is a popular choice, it lacks reliability and consistency (Lai & Karlawish, 2007;Stocking et al., 2008). Furthermore, the assessments are open to conflicts of interest and lack the detail required to comprehensively assess a patient's capacity. ...
... Not only are dementia evaluations an economic burden to older African Americans that traditionally suffer from greater financial disadvantages than Caucasians (Dilworth-Anderson & Moon, 2019; Zhang, Hayward, & Yu, 2016), there also tends to be a greater failure in recognizing cognitive impairments in African Americans by primary physicians (Connell & Gallant, 1996;Hargrave, 2019). Other unique obstacles that contribute to delayed helpseeking among African Americans include: a lack of awareness of facts surrounding AD (e.g., Blay, Furtado, & Peluso, 2008;Connell, Roberts, & Mclaughlin, 2007); a greater perception of AD symptomatology as a natural part of aging (e.g., Hodgson & Cutler, 2004;Roberts et al., 2003); increased stigma and embarrassment surrounding mental health concerns (Danner, Smith, Jessa, & Hudson, 2008); and racial discriminatory healthcare practices that contribute to patient mistrust and discrepant medication distributions (Barnes & Bennett, 2014;Hernandez, Mcclendon, Zhou, Sachs, & Lerner, 2010). ...
... What is known, is that increased subjective wellbeing is related to many aspects of life [3], including marriage [4], friendship [5], overall social support network [6], income [7], work performance [8], mental [9] and physical [10] health, and even longevity [11]. Beyond the individual, the costs of low levels of subjective wellbeing can also be directly seen within society. ...