Debbie E. McGhee's research while affiliated with Trinity Washington University and other places

Publications (3)

Article
Full-text available
Experiment 1 unexpectedly found sex differences in evaluative gender stereotypes (only men associated male with potency, and only women associated female with warmth). Experiment 2 dramatically reduced sex differences in gender-potency judgments when measures were redesigned to avoid implying that potency was positive (the concepts, strong and weak...
Article
Full-text available
Using the Implicit Association Test (IAT), recent experiments have demonstrated a strong and automatic positive evaluation of White Americans and a relatively negative evaluation of African Americans. Interpretations of this finding as revealing pro-White attitudes rest critically on tests of alternative interpretations, the most obvious one being...
Article
An implicit association test (IAT) measures differential association of 2 target concepts with an attribute. The 2 concepts appear in a 2-choice task (2-choice task (e.g., flower vs. insect names), and the attribute in a 2nd task (e.g., pleasant vs. unpleasant words for an evaluation attribute). When instructions oblige highly associated categories...

Citations

... We used images provided by Harvard's Project Implicit (www.implicit.harvard.edu) to assess White vs Black target, and adjectives provided by Dasgupta et al. (2000) to assess pleasant vs unpleasant categories. Participants completed seven blocks of stimuli sorting trials, alternating compatible blocks («White people» + «pleasant») to incompatible blocks («Black people» + «unpleasant»), and practice trials to critical trials. ...
... We then used representational similarity analysis (RSA; Kriegeskorte et al., 2008) to examine dissimilarity in neural representations of Black and White faces under conditions of uncertainty across functional brain networks. Finally, to constrain the interpretation of our results, we examined whether scores on a measure of implicit racial bias (Implicit Association Test, Greenwald et al., 1998) differentially contributed to neural dissimilarity in representation of Black and White faces under different conditions of uncertainty. ...
... First, previous research has shown that we do tend to apply stereotypes to chatbots (Nowak and Fox 2018) and that chatbots are often gendered to reinforce and perpetuate such stereotypes (Costa and Ribas 2019). However, stereotypes have both implicit and explicit qualities (Rudman and McGhee, 2001) and the measures of the current study might not be strong enough to capture the implicit processes behind stereotyping that is it trying to explain. In so doing people might have explicitly changed their answers to not come across as conforming to stereotypes or the implicit reactions of participants is so small that the current study was not able to find them. ...