David S. Michaud's research while affiliated with Consumer Health Products Canada and other places

Publications (26)

Article
The Canadian Perspectives on Environmental Noise Survey investigated expectations and attitudes toward environmental noise in rural/remote, suburban and urban regions across Canada. A 26-item online questionnaire was completed by 6647 randomly selected Canadians 18 years of age and older between April 12, 2021 and May 25, 2021. Stepwise multivariat...
Article
Entrenched in the well-established link between stress and health, noise exposure as a potential contributor to stress-related health effects receives tremendous attention. Indeed, exposure to noise can act as a stressor as evidenced through increased heart rate, blood pressure, adrenaline, epinephrine, and cortisol. Cortisol is secreted from the a...
Article
Noise annoyance toward landscaping equipment was one of nine sources evaluated in the Canadian Perspectives on Environmental Noise Survey, completed online by 6647 Canadian adults. At 6.3% (95% confidence interval = 5.8–6.9), landscaping equipment ranked third after road traffic and construction noise. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression mode...
Article
Health Canada, in collaboration with Advanis, conducted the Canadian Perspectives on Environmental Noise Survey (CPENS) to investigate expectations and attitudes toward environmental noise in rural and non-rural Canada. The CPENS, a 26-item questionnaire, was completed online by 6647 randomly selected Canadians, age 18 y and older between April and...
Article
Noise-induced stress may precipitate cardiovascular diseases. This research assessed the association between sensorineural bilateral high frequency hearing loss (HFHL), as an indication of excessive noise exposure, and cardiovascular outcomes. Participants (n = 6318, ∼50% male) 20–79 years were recruited through the cross-sectional Canadian Health...
Article
Self-reported occupational noise exposure has been associated with impaired hearing, but its relationship with extra-auditory affects remains uncertain. This research assessed the association between self-reported occupational noise exposure and cardiovascular outcomes. Participants (n = 6318, ∼50% male) from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (20...
Article
Full-text available
Studies have yielded inconsistent evidence for an association between long-term average wind turbine sound pressure level (SPL) and disturbed sleep. Transient changes in sleep may be more susceptible to short-term variations in wind turbine SPL throughout the sleep period time. We analyzed sleep actigraphy data (subject sleep nights=2094, males=151...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Unprotected exposure to handheld lasers can cause temporary or permanent vision loss depending on the laser classification. Objective: To evaluate the occurrence of, and details associated with, reported eye injuries resulting from handheld lasers. Methods: A 14-item questionnaire developed by Health Canada was distributed by the C...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of the current paper was to characterize indoor wind turbine sound pressure levels (SPLs) to assess the audibility of wind turbine noise indoors, accounting for window opening, frequency spectra, and presbycusis. Loudspeaker generated noise was used to determine the outdoor to indoor SPL differences at 11 representative dwellings usin...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Noise emissions from wind turbines are one of multiple wind turbine features capable of generating annoyance that ranges in magnitude from not at all annoyed to extremely annoyed. No analysis to date can simultaneously reflect the change in all magnitudes of annoyance toward multiple wind turbine features. The primary objective in this...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: An aggregate annoyance construct has been developed to account for annoyance that ranges from not at all annoyed to extremely annoyed, toward multiple wind turbine features. The practical value associated with aggregate annoyance would be strengthened if it was related to health. The objective of the current paper was to assess the asso...
Article
Full-text available
It has been extensively communicated that Health Canada’s Community Noise and Health Study (CNHS) did not find positive associations between wind turbine noise (WTN) levels and any of the evaluated health outcomes, beyond an increase in the prevalence of high annoyance toward several wind turbine features. The authors emphasize that this general co...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Epidemiological studies have suggested an association between the relative risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and long-term exposure to elevated levels of transportation noise. The contention is that this association is largely owing to an increase in stress-related biomarkers that are thought to be associated with CVD. A...
Article
Health Canada’s Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study assessed self-reported and objective measures of sleep on a sub-sample of the study’s 1238 participants. The data analysis indicated that calculated long term outdoor wind turbine noise (WTN) levels up to 46 dBA did not have a significant influence on the evaluated measures of sleep (Michaud et al...
Article
Full-text available
Study objectives: To investigate the association between self-reported and objective measures of sleep and wind turbine noise (WTN) exposure. Methods: The Community Noise and Health Study, a cross-sectional epidemiological study, included an in-house computer-assisted survey and sleep pattern monitoring over a 7 d period. Outdoor WTN levels were...
Article
Full-text available
In Canada, population-level estimates of hearing loss have been based on self-reported data, yielding estimates of 4% or 5%. Self-reported hearing difficulties may result in underestimates of hearing loss, particularly among people with mild loss and among older adults. The 2012/2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey (cycle 3) collected audiometric a...
Article
Full-text available
Living within the vicinity of wind turbines may have adverse impacts on health measures associated with quality of life (QOL). There are few studies in this area and inconsistent findings preclude definitive conclusions regarding the impact that exposure to wind turbine noise (WTN) may have on QOL. In the current study (officially titled the Commun...
Article
This paper summarizes the results of the Health Canada Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study. One participant between the ages of 18-79 years was randomly selected from each household. The final sample included 1238 participates (606 males) living between 0.25 and 11.22 km from wind turbines. The response rate was 78.9% and did not significantly vary...
Article
Full-text available
In Canada, all levels of government share jurisdiction for regulating sound that could be harmful to Canadians. The location of wind turbines and associated sound level limits fall under the jurisdiction of provincial governments. As of October 2013, Canada’s installed capacity has surpassed 7 Gigawatts (Canadian Wind Energy Association, 2013). At...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The widespread use of personal digital audio players by young Canadians and the longer playing times at potentially high sound levels may have a deleterious effect on young people's hearing. Health Canada has recently published results indicating that the maximum output levels from these devices range between 101 dBA and 107 dBA, but a number of fa...
Article
Full-text available
Health Canada is in the process of developing a document, Guidance for Environmental Assessment-Health Impacts of Noise (Guidance) on how to assess noise impacts in environmental assessments. The guidance document is needed to assist Health Canada in providing consistent expert advice on the health effects of project noise, when requested under the...

Citations

... [40] However, not all studies investigating CV health and auditory functions found evidence in favour of the existence of a link between the two. [41][42][43][44][45] . CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license It is made available under a is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. ...
... , as identified by its reference number, provides the relevant bibliographic details and an overview of the objective assessment of sleep quality and environmental factors concerned. Some researchers chose ACT to measure sleep quality when studying the effects of acoustic environment on sleep.[138][139][140][141][142][143][144][145][146][147][148][149][150][151][152][153][154] Mostly, these studies were conducted on the field, that is, in the field to determine the subjects' sleep status. ...
... Another study was conducted in houses near wind turbines in Ontario, Canada, to compare the noise of wind turbines with windows closed and open. The results showed that the A-weighted sound pressure level difference between indoors and outdoors was 25.9 dB with windows closed and 13.8 dB with windows partially open (Keith et al., 2019). Additionally, for the C-weighted sound pressure level, the difference between indoor and outdoor was 15.3 dB with closed windows and 9.9 dB with partially open windows. ...
... In a survey of ophthalmologists and optometrists in Canada, of the total respondents who had patients classified as having a severe eye injury, most were minor (36.85%), while others were moderate (9.7%), severe (6.3%), and disabling (0.7%). 21 Although survey accuracy is dependent on the wording of the questionnaire and the percentage of respondents, I was surprised to learn about severe and disabling consequences related to Class 2 laser devices. ...
... Voicescu et al. found that flicker shadow annoyance was best predicted by noise level [22], whereas Haac et al. found that visual impression (did respondents like the look of the wind farm?) was the most important factor to predict noise annoyance (the next important factor was noise sensitivity) [23]. Michaud et al. attempted to integrate separate annoyances from a wind farm into 'aggregate annoyance' and higher scores on this scale showed to be correlated with a number of health conditions (blood pressure, perceived stress, sleep quality, physical health, psychological well-being, chronic pain, tinnitus, migraines/headaches and dizziness) [24]. ...
... Je stärker die Befragungspersonen die WEA-Geräusche als ein "Wuschen" bzw. "Rauschen" wahrnehmen, desto höher fällt der Grad der WEA-Belästigung insgesamt aus (siehe Abb. 10 [7], [8], [14], [15]. Um also in einem Wohngebiet rund um Windenergieanlagen die Belästigung durch WEA-Geräusche zu reduzieren, bedarf es eines holistischen Lärmmanagementansatzes, der die akustischen Aspekte ebenso wie die kontextuellen Einflüsse im Blick hat und Lösungsansätze in einem Gesamtansatz -im besten Fall unter Einbezug der Anwohnerschaft -verfolgt. ...
... For the interest of readers, publications by Michaud et al. 2016 [24] [28] [30] have provided corrections related to the following Health Canada Study results [34] [35] [36]. Corrections include regarding reference [28], an advisory that the data file used to analyse the objective sleep endpoints included data processing errors and the steps taken to conduct a reanalysis [34]; for reference [24] correction of a citation and an endnote description [35]; and for reference [30] corrections of a citation, plus advisories to reduce the values in one of the figures and to shift a WT noise curve by approximately 0.8 dB [36]. ...
... The incidence of hypertension: For the current overview we included 22 studies, investigating the association between noise and hypertension [88,90,91,94,103,111,115,117,118,121,125,129,133,134,138,143]. In 11 studies the association between road traffic noise exposure and the incidence of hypertension was investigated: eight cohort studies [88,89,115,134,143], one case-control study [125] and one ecological study [90]. ...
... 16, no. 1, 2022 affected by noise, exceeding 65 dB, which is the safety threshold [1]. Besides disorders of auditory system, harmful effects include the development of various neurological states and altered cognition [3]. However, while the alterations in auditory system have been studied extensively (among alterations are the delay of functional organization, changes in cell signaling, other molecular modifications), there is conflicting information regarding the effects of noise on cognition. ...
... Several scientific studies with peer-reviewed on wind farm noise were conducted and found that wind farms infra-sound is not a threat to public health and there is no empirical evidence of "Wind Turbine Syndrome" triggering vibroacoustic conditions [183], [184]. The law sets out criteria for distance to residences and noise limits. ...