David R. Danielson's research while affiliated with Stanford University and other places

Publications (6)

Article
No Abstract. Peer Reviewed http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/61241/1/1440410114_ftp.pdf
Article
In this study 2,684 people evaluated the credibility of two live Web sites on a similar topic (such as health sites). We gathered the comments people wrote about each siteís credibility and analyzed the comments to find out what features of a Web site get noticed when people evaluate credibility. We found that the ìdesign lookî of the site was ment...
Article
Understanding the specific nature of disorientation in hyperspace will benefit from a battery of characterizations of the space being navigated, the user navigating the space, and their interaction. This study focuses on a particular consideration for understanding the "lost-in-hyperspace" problem, namely "transitional volatility". Metrics investig...
Article
Knowledge regarding how Web information-seekers behave with respect to the structures and cues they are provided with may shed light on general principles of navigation in electronic spaces, and assist designers in making more informed structural decisions. This study examines user movement through hierarchically structured Web sites and the behavi...

Citations

... The name of the model, MAIN, is an acronym, representing the affordances of Modality (M), Agency (A), Interactivity (I), and Navigability (N). Media consumers need to spend extra time and energy in assessing the quality of information because the overabundance of digital media content obscures the sources of information and the means of information dissemination (Fogg, Cuellar, and Danielson 2002). However, individuals are also known as "cognitive misers," and they tend to expend as little cognitive effort as possible to process information (Fiske and Taylor 1991). ...
... (1) The circle of knowledge explained as follows: General knowledge and special knowledge: a social media user must know about communicating on social media (Fogg et al., 2002), for example, netizens must be able to have sufficient knowledge about the things that are expressed or information posted on social media, not give wrong information about a thing, special knowledge that must be possessed by netizens must have high competence in discussing a matter on social media. It is not intended to limit freedom of communication or expression, but to be able to uphold the ethics of social media, namely providing information, sharing knowledge/information correctly and based on facts and data. ...
... Similar to the physical store experience where shoppers can walk through a store with their spatial representations of a store layout to find their desired products (Titus and Everett, 1995), the structure of online navigation design is critical to effectively engage users to identify right product information (Hoque and Lohse, 1999). Disorientation (Jarvenpaa and Todd, 1997;Smith, 1996) is claimed as the oldest and the most devastating problem of web navigation (Danielson, 2003), given that it causes users to get lost without clues about their current location in the navigation system, which makes it difficult to further seek their needed information or actions with the system (Woods, 1984). This phenomenon is defined as "lost in hyperspace" (Smith, 1996, p. 365), where users have cognitive difficulties in finding their way. ...
... This argumentation is also supported by previous research; for example, Kim and Dennis (2019) found that highlighting the source instead of the headline of a social media article makes readers less likely to believe the article's content, arguing that the article's design can nudge readers to be more skeptical about its content. However, Fogg et al. (2003) also found that visual design elements instead of content and source information are decisive for the credibility assessment of online information. Hence, we hypothesize: ...
... Tester l'utilisabilité et l'acceptabilitése faire un avis plus fondé sur sa prise en main. Par exemple, dans l'étude deDanielson (2002), les participants naviguaient librement dans le site pendant 15 minutes avant de répondre à un questionnaire.Lin et Lu (2000) laissaient les utilisateurs se familiariser pendant 30 minutes avec le site, puis leur posaient des questions sur leur expérience. Dans notre étude, la navigation était sans doute trop dirigée et trop limitée pour que les enseignants puissent donner un avis éclairé sur son utilisabilité . ...
... Hence, we argue that a performance statement is more trusted if it is supplemented with information on the data source, such as explicitly mentioning the organization sharing the information. In contrast, a lack of information sources increases doubts about the content of the information as well as uncertainty about the responsibility for the data (Metzger & Flanagin, 2013;Rieh & Danielson, 2007;Sundar, 2008). This argumentation is also supported by previous research; for example, Kim and Dennis (2019) found that highlighting the source instead of the headline of a social media article makes readers less likely to believe the article's content, arguing that the article's design can nudge readers to be more skeptical about its content. ...