David R. Anderson's research while affiliated with Colorado State University and other places

Publications (84)

Chapter
Distance sampling is a widely used group of closely related methods for estimating the density and/or abundance of biological populations. The main methods are line-transect sampling and point-transect sampling. In both cases, observer(s) perform a standardized survey along a series of randomly located lines or points, searching for objects of inte...
Article
We analyzed data of adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) banded throughout North America during the past 30 years, using a model developed to estimate heterogeneity in survival rates of marked individuals. The model incorporating heterogeneity in survival rates was often the most parsimonious model for the data sets analyzed, thus constituting an ad...
Article
Full-text available
We briefly outline the information-theoretic (I-T) approaches to valid inference including a review of some simple methods for making formal inference from all the hypotheses in the model set (multimodel inference). The I-T approaches can replace the usual t tests and ANOVA tables that are so inferentially limited, but still commonly used. The I-T...
Book
Full-text available
We used data from 11 long-term studies to assess temporal and spatial patterns in fecundity, apparent survival, recruitment, and annual finite rate of population change of Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) from 1985 to 2008. Our objectives were to evaluate the status and trends of the subspecies throughout its range and to investig...
Article
Abstract Although several studies have indicated the importance of forbs in brood habitats, no studies have quantified direct effects of the amount of forb cover on sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) chicks. In 2002 and 2003, we conducted field experiments in Middle Park and Moffat County, Colorado, USA, respectively. Our objective was to quan...
Article
A general, consistent strategy for data analysis is outlined, based on information and likelihood theory. A priori considerations lead to the definition of a set of candidate models, simple criteria are useful in ranking and calibrating the models based on estimates of (relative) Kullback-Leibler information, inference can be based on either the be...
Article
Full-text available
In situations where limited knowledge of a system exists and the ratio of data points to variables is small, variable selection methods can often be misleading. Freedman (Am Stat 37:152–155, 1983) demonstrated how common it is to select completely unrelated variables as highly “significant” when the number of data points is similar in magnitude to...
Article
Counting techniques are widely used to study and monitor terrestrial birds. To assess current applications of counting techniques, we reviewed landbird studies published 1989-1998 in nine major journals and one symposium. Commonly used techniques fell into two groups: Procedures that used counts of bird detections as an index to abundance (index co...
Chapter
Full-text available
The development of statistical methods for the analysis of demographic processes in marked animal populations has brought with it the challenges of communication between the disciplines of statistics, ecology, evolutionary biology and computer science. In order to aid communication and comprehension, we sought to root out a number of cases of ambig...
Book
Science is about discovering new things, about better understanding processes and systems, and generally furthering our knowledge. Deep in science philosophy is the notion of hypotheses and mathematical models to represent these hypotheses. It is partially the quantification of hypotheses that provides the illusive concept of rigor in science. Scie...
Article
1. Stephens et al . (2005) argue for 'pluralism' in statistical analysis, combining null hypothesis testing and information-theoretic (I-T) methods. We show that I-T methods are more informative even in single variable problems and we provide an ecological example. 2. I-T methods allow inferences to be made from multiple models simultaneously. We b...
Chapter
Distance sampling is a widely used group of closely related methods for estimating the density and/or abundance of biological populations. The main methods are line-transect sampling and point-transect sampling. In both cases, observer(s) perform a standardized survey along a series of randomly located lines or points, searching for objects of inte...
Article
Full-text available
We analyzed demographic data from northern spotted owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) from 14 study areas in Washington, Oregon, and California for 1985–2003. The purpose of our analyses was to provide an assessment of the status and trends of northern spotted owl populations throughout most of their geographic range. The 14 study areas made up appr...
Article
Full-text available
Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis) are territorial, generally nonmigratory, and strongly philopatric. Nevertheless, California Spotted Owls (S. o. occidentalis) exhibited breeding dispersal during 7% of interannual observations of banded individuals (n = 54 of 743 occasions). Based on ecological theory and published literature, we made a priori pred...
Article
Full-text available
Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis) are territorial, generally nonmigratory, and strongly philopatric. Nevertheless, California Spotted Owls (S. o. occidentalis) exhibited breeding dispersal during 7% of interannual observations of banded individuals (n = 54 of 743 occasions). Based on ecological theory and published literature, we made a priori pred...
Article
The California spotted owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) has been at the center of political and administrative debate due to its association with commercially valuable forest. Several studies have compared the forest cover types used by California spotted owls with the cover types that are generally available, establishing the association betw...
Chapter
Distance sampling covers a range of methods in which distances of detected objects (usually animals) from a line or point are recorded, from which object density or abundance is estimated. The most widely used methods are line transect sampling and point transect sampling. Objects on the line or point are usually assumed to be detected with certain...
Article
The trapping web is a method for estimating the density and abundance of animal populations. A Monte Carlo simulation study is performed to explore performance of the trapping web for estimating animal density under a variety of web designs and animal behaviours. The trapping performs well when animals have home ranges, even if the home ranges are...
Article
This chapter gives results from some illustrative exploration of the performance of information-theoretic criteria for model selection and methods to quantify precision when there is model selection uncertainty. The methods given in Chapter 4 are illustrated and additional insights are provided based on simulation and real data. Section 5.2 utilize...
Article
While Engeman (2003) makes a good case for the importance of study design and that studies that provide only index values are sometimes easier and less expensive, I find I do not agree with his central comments concerning the value of indices. Without estimates of detection probabilities, the use of index values is without a scientific or logical b...
Article
We offer suggestions for improving the validity of scientific inferences in wildlife ecology and management. These suggestions are offered under 7 categories as subjects of debate and refinement within our profession: university education, manuscript review and publi- cation, professional meetings, in-service training, agency funding, review of fie...
Article
Full-text available
Statistical models for estimating absolute densities of field populations of animals have been widely used over the last century in both scientific studies and wildlife management programs. To date, two general classes of density estimation models have been developed: models that use data sets from capture-recapture or removal sampling techniques (...
Article
We offer suggestions to avoid misuse of information-theoretic methods in wildlife laboratory and field studies. Our suggestions relate to basic science issues and the need to ask deeper questions (4 problems are noted), errors in the way that analytical methods are used (7 problems), and outright mistakes seen commonly in the published literature (...
Article
Full-text available
We obtained banding and recovery data from the Bird Banding Laboratory (operated by the Biological Resources Division of the US Geological Survey) for adults from 129 avian species that had been continuously banded for > 24 years. Data were partitioned by gender, banding period (winter versus summer), and by states/provinces. Data sets were initial...
Article
Counting techniques are widely used to study and monitor terrestrial birds. To assess current applications of counting techniques, we reviewed landbird studies published 1989–1998 in nine major journals and one symposium. Commonly used techniques fell into two groups: procedures that used counts of bird detections as an index to abundance (index co...
Article
Conflicts often arise in the management of natural resources. Often they result from differing perceptions, varying interpretations of the law, and self-interests among stakeholder groups (for example, the values and perceptions about spotted owls and forest management differ markedly among environmental groups, government regulatory agencies, and...
Article
We give suggestions for the presentation of research results from frequentist, information-theoretic, and Bayesian analysis paradigms, followed by several general suggestions. The information-theoretic and Bayesian methods offer alternative approaches to data analysis and inference compared to traditionally used methods. Guidance is lacking on the...
Article
Full-text available
We examine the degree to which field observers can meet the assumptions underlying line transect sampling to monitor populations of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii). We present the results of 2 field trials using artificial tortoise models in 3 size classes. The trials were conducted on 2 occasions on an area south of Las Vegas, Nevada, where...
Article
We describe an information-theoretic paradigm for analysis of ecological data, based on Kullback-Lei- bler information, that is an extension of likelihood theory and avoids the pitfalls of null hypothesis testing. Infor- mation-theoretic approaches emphasise a deliberate focus on the a priori science in developing a set of multiple working hypothes...
Article
Each copy of any part of a JSTOR transmission must contain the same copyright notice that appears on the screen or printed page of such transmission. The JSTOR Archive is a trusted digital repository providing for long-term preservation and access to leading academic journals and scholarly literature from around the world. The Archive is supported...
Article
Full-text available
A controversy exists in the Pacific Northwest of the United States between logging of old-growth coniferous forests and conservation of Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) populations. This species has a strong association with old-growth forests that also have economic value as timber. Research questions relevant to conservation of t...
Article
This paper presents a review and critique of statistical null hypothesis testing in ecological studies in general, and wildlife studies in particular, and describes an alternative. Our review of Ecology and the journal of Wildlife Management found the use of null hypothesis testing to be pervasive. The estimated number of P-values appearing within...
Article
We provide background information to allow a heuristic understanding of two types of criteria used in selecting a model for making inferences from ringing data. The first type of criteria (e.g. AIC, AlCc QAICc and TIC) are estimates of (relative) Kullback-Leibler information or distance and attempt to select a good approximating model for inference...
Chapter
Full reality cannot be included in a model; thus we seek a good model to approximate the effects or factors supported by the empirical data. The selection of an appropriate approximating model is critical to statistical inference from many types of empirical data. This chapter introduces concepts from information theory (see Guiasu 1977), which has...
Chapter
This chapter gives results from some illustrative exploration of the performance of information-theoretic criteria for model-selection and methods to quantify precision when there is model-selection uncertainty. The methods given in Chapter 4 are illustrated and additional insights are provided based on simulation and real data. Section 5.2 utilize...
Book
Information theory and log-likelihood models - a basis for model selection and inference practical use of the information theoretic approach model selection uncertainty with examples Monte Carlo insights and extended examples statistical theory.
Chapter
The understanding of model-selection uncertainty requires that one consider the process that generates the sample data we observe. For a given field, laboratory, or computer simulation study, data are observed on some process or system. If a second, independent, data set could be observed on the same process or system under nearly identical conditi...
Chapter
Model building and data analysis in the biological sciences somewhat presupposes that the person has some advanced education in the quantitative sciences, and statistics in particular. This requirement also implies that a person has substantial knowledge of statistical hypothesis-testing approaches. Such people, including ourselves over the past se...
Chapter
This chapter contains theory and derivations relevant to Kullback-Leibler information-theory-based model selection. We have tried to make the other chapters of this book readable by a general audience, especially graduate students in various fields. Hence, we have reserved this chapter for the theoretical material we feel it is important to make av...
Article
We evaluated the ability of the linked sex harvest strategy (LSHS) proposed by McCullough et al. (1990) to determine optimum harvest of cervid populations from harvest statistics alone. This strategy purports to optimize total harvest by adjusting female harvest in response to observed changes in male harvest, without knowing the population's size...
Article
Studies of life history evolution in passerine birds often depend on examination of annual survival probability of adult birds. Most studies rely on return rates (proportion of marked individuals released in one year that are recaptured in the next year) to estimate annual survival probability. Yet, return rate includes both the probability of surv...
Article
Analysis of capture-recapture data is critically dependent upon selection of a proper model for inference. Model selection is particularly important in the analysis of multiple, interrelated data sets. This paper evaluates information theoretic approaches to selection of a parsimonious model and compares them to the use of likelihood ratio tests us...
Article
We present three empirical methods for risk assessment in field studies of free-ranging vertebrates. First, we advocate statistical inference concerning population recruitment or mortality in response to ecological hazards. Second, if inferences about both recruitment and mortality are available, one can use a Leslie- Lefkovitch matrix to estimate...
Article
Full-text available
Closed capture-recapture (CR) estimators have been used extensively to estimate population size. Most closed CR approaches have been developed and evaluated for discrete-time models, but there has been little effort to evaluate their continuous-time counterparts. Continuous-time estimators — developed using maximum likelihood theory by Craig (1953)...
Article
The objective of this paper is to introduce the logical basis of AIC-based model selection to persons analyzing capture-recapture data and to explore the key theorettical aspect of AIC based model selection, for open-model capture-recapture, needed for AIC to perform well in this context. Almost all previous work on AIC assumes a Gaussian model; th...
Article
Full-text available
The understanding of the dynamics of animal populations and of related ecological and evolutionary issues frequently depends on a direct analysis of life history parameters. For instance, examination of trade-offs between reproduction and survival usually rely on individually marked animals, for which the exact time of death is most often unknown,...
Chapter
Selection of an appropriate model as the basis for data analysis is critical for valid inference. Fundamental to this issue is the concept that the datawill only “support” limited inference. A model should have enough structure and parameters to account adequately for the significant variability in the data, otherwise bias in the estimators is like...
Article
We assessed effectiveness of the point system by examining band-recovery data for the 1980's. States using the point system during 1980-87 changed to conventional bag limits in 1988 and 1989. This change provided a basis for contrasting the effect of the point system in redistributing harvest pressure toward male and away from female mallards (Anas...
Article
Full-text available
We substantiate our contention that our multivariate analyses (Rexstad et al. 1988) mimic analyses found in the wildlife literature. We caution users of multivariate techniques that data collected in our discipline are unlikely to meet the restrictive assumptions of these techniques. Even if assumptions are met, we contend interpretation of the res...
Article
We used underwater video in conjunction with the line transect method and a Fourier series estimator to make 13 independent estimates of the density of known populations of bricks lying on the bottom in shallows of Lake Huron. The pooled estimate of density (95.5 bricks per hectare) was close to the true density (89.8 per hectare), and there was no...
Article
Full-text available
We analyzed a data set constructed from functionally unrelated, easily collected observations (e.g., meat, stock, and liquor prices) around Fort Collins, Colorado, using principal components analysis (PCA), canonical correlation analysis (CC), and discriminant function analysis (DFA). Each produced seemingly significant results and suggested strong...
Article
Effectiveness of the point system was investigated by contrasting first-year recovery rates of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) during the pre-point system period (1960-69) and during a point system period (1972-84). Three components were examined to investigate effectiveness of the point system: decreasing recovery rates of females, increasing recove...
Article
Annual survival rates (S) were estimated from band recovery, recapture, and neck-collar resighting data for adult trumpeter swans (Cygnus buccinator) near Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge (RRLNWR), Montana. Analysis of banding and recovery data collected between 1949 and 1982 yielded an estimated S of 88%. Analysis of resightings of neck-col...
Article
Reproductive tracts recovered from female Cervus elaphus nelsoni harvested during late season hunts of December 1980 and 1981 in N Utah were used to estimate dates of conception. These dates were distributed bimodally with the period between peak frequencies coinciding with the regular elk and mule deer Odocoileus hemionus hunting seasons of the pr...
Article
Efficiency and relative bias of strip transect and line transect (Fourier series estimator) survey methods were compared. Comparisons involved the negative exponential and half-normal detection functions for expected sample sizes of 40, 60, and 100 and 3 levels of spatial aggregation. Efficiency and bias were computed as functions of strip transect...
Article
Full-text available
A new density estimation technique using a trapping web and distance sampling theory was evaluated using Monte Carlo methods. A sophisticated computer algorithm simulated movement of small mammals according to four different home range utilization distributions. Trapping of small mammal populations was simulated with four spatial patterns, two popu...
Article
The nested grid approach is theoretically sound but requires more data than are likely to be collected in practice. This approach represents only a small improvement over the naive approach.-P.J.Jarvis
Article
Full-text available
We evaluated naive density estimates and density estimates corrected for “edge effect” using mean maximum distance moved (MMDM) for small mammal populations by Monte Carlo methods. Two densities, 25 and 100/ha, were generated in random or slightly clumped spatial patterns within a 4-ha area and populations had average capture probabilities of eithe...
Article
This paper compares the strip and line transect sampling methods of estimating the density (number of objects per unit area) of biological populations. We assume the objects of interest (e.g., birds, mammals, nests, sign, etc.) do not move in response to the observer prior to detection. Methods dealing with ways to sue incomplete counts are emphasi...
Article
It is now widely believed that a largely compensatory relationship exists between hunting mortality and other forms of mortality for Anas platyrhynchos. This paper employs a general probabilistic model formulated to include a parameter (representing a continuum between complete compensation (b=0) and total additivity (b=1). Maximum likelihood estim...
Article
Band recovery data from over 410 000 adult Anas platyrhynchos banded in North America between 1950-1979 were analyzed to examine the effect of exploitation on annual survival rate. Two extreme hypotheses were defined: completely compensatory, and totally additive, and an explicit mathematical model was presented to represent each hypothesis. Compar...
Article
Full-text available
Distance sampling methodology is adapted to enable animal density (number per unit of area) to be estimated from capture-recapture and removal data. A trapping web design provides the link between capture data and distance sampling theory. It is possible to check qualitatively the critical assumption on which the web design and the estimator are ba...
Article
The problem of estimating animal abundance is common in wildlife management and environmental impact asessment. Capture-recapture and removal methods are often used to estimate population size. Statistical Inference From Capture Data On Closed Animal Populations, a monograph by Otis et al. (1978), provides a comprehensive synthesis of much of the w...
Article
This monograph is out of print and not available. Much of the material is covered in the books on Distance Sampling. One of the early versions is available at http://www.colostate.edu/depts/coopunit/download.html or http://www.ruwpa.st-and.ac.uk/distance.book/download.html
Article
For the past 25 years estimation of mortality rates for waterfowl has been based almost entirely on the composite dynamic life table. We examined the specific assumptions for this method and derived a valid goodness of fit test. We performed this test on 45 data sets representing a cross section of banded samples for various waterfowl species, geog...
Article
Practical field procedures for conducting line transect surveys to estimate the size or density of biological populations are presented and discussed. Assumptions required for valid line transect surveys are specified. We emphasize that it is crucial to conduct observations along straight transects and obtain accurate measurements of distances and...
Article
Full-text available
Redhead duck (Aythya americana) nesting and habitat change was studied in Knudson Marsh, Utah, in 1974 and 1975, and compared with earlier studies from 1950 and 1955 on the same marsh. Water conditions in 1975 were found to be similar to those in 1950, both years of favorable habitat, yet there was a decline in numbers of redheads from 500 pairs in...

Citations

... Still, an increasing body of literature reports the prevalence of this behaviour, including species earlier considered highly philopatric and monogamous. Several possible drivers of breeding dispersal have been suggested: individual characteristics such as young age (Choudhury 1995;Daniels et al. 2000;Beheler et al. 2003;Blakesley et al. 2006;Cline et al. 2013), being a female (Winkler et al. 2004;Beheler et al. 2003;Pärt and Gustafsson 1989;Calabuig et al. 2008;Cline et al. 2013, cf. Blakesley et al. 2006), low previous breeding success (Pärt and Gustavson 1989;Beheler et al. 2003;Winkler et al. 2004;Calabuig et al. 2008), reproductive failure (Haas 1998;Bradley et al. 1990;Daniels et al. 2000;Blakesley et al. 2006;Newton 2010) as well as spatial or temporal conditions such as sub-optimal habitat quality (Newton 1986(Newton , 2010Forero et al. 1999;Blakesley et al. 2006;Cline et al. 2013). ...
... For instance, bioacoustic avian data can be used for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of bird population composition (Rosenstock et al. 2002;Klingbail and Willig 2015), the study of different ecological moments of a species (migration or reproductive seasons), or the detection of the presence of endangered species in a particular site (Garnett et al. 2011). ...
... We first tested for goodness-of-fit of the data to the general time-dependent CJS model using Test2 and Test3, and the cumulative chi-square value from these two tests, in program RELEASE. 35 We then continued by building models that test a priori hypotheses about the effects of year, morph and their putative interactions on capture and survival probabilities. We modelled capture rate as a function of time (i.e., year) and morph, because we hypothesized that the two morphs might differ in their visibility to humans. ...
... Model assumptions were validated by inspection of diagnostic plots (residuals vs. fitted, Q-Q and Cooks distance). We selected the best predictors based on the model with the lowest AICc (Beier et al., 2001), with model coefficients used to report effect sizes and confidence intervals calculated with the "standardize_parameters" function in the "effectsize" package for R (Ben-Shachar et al., 2020). ...
... Epistemic uncertainties are sources of imprecision that affect GA assessment and hamper the development of new and suitable model designs for GA growth. 11,13,14 The presence of these uncertainties, if sufficient in magnitude, can affect the quality of the information collected from experiments, leading to variability in results, lack of reproducibility, and lower prediction accuracy. Epistemic uncertainties relevant to GA progression were identified in the assessment process, such as measurement error, subjective judgment, model input uncertainty, and model structure uncertainty. ...
... The AIC includes a penalty for over-fitting the model, not allowing for an increase in the statistical bias when more parameters are fitted (Wilson et al. 2013). Another advantage of the AIC in model selection is that AIC is independent of the order in which models are computed (Anderson et al. 2001). ...
... We started by fitting a null model (no landscape-level covariates), a global model (all six landscape-level covariates, below) and models with all but one landscape-level covariate. Competing models were ranked via Akaike's information criterion (AIC, Burnham and Anderson 2002). In sequential steps, effects of the other landscape-level covariates were removed from the top model from the previous step until removing parameters did not increase AIC model fit. ...
... The lowest AICc score indicated the best-fitting model. However, models with a difference in their AICc scores (DAICc) smaller than two units were considered to have a similar fit to the data (Burnham and Anderson, 2002). ...
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