David J. Cooper's research while affiliated with Brown University and other places

Publications (10)

Article
There are numerous historical and textual references to energy-like somatic experiences (ELSEs) from religious traditions, and even a few psychological studies that have documented related phenomena. However, ELSEs remain an understudied effect of meditation in contemporary research. Based upon narratives from a large qualitative sample of Buddhist...
Article
Background: Research on the adverse effects of mindfulness-based programs (MBPs) has been sparse and hindered by methodological imprecision. Methods: The 44-item Meditation Experiences Interview (MedEx-I) was used by an independent assessor to measure meditation-related side effects (MRSE) following three variants of an 8-week program of mindful...
Article
Full-text available
Studies in the psychology and phenomenology of religious experience have long acknowledged similarities with various forms of psychopathology. Consequently, it has been important for religious practitioners and mental health professionals to establish criteria by which religious, spiritual, or mystical experiences can be differentiated from psychop...
Chapter
Challenging meditation experiences have been documented in Buddhist literature, in psychological research, and in a recent qualitative study by the authors. Some of the central questions in the investigation of this topic are: How are meditation-related challenges to be interpreted or appraised? Through which processes are experiences determined to...
Article
Full-text available
Buddhist-derived meditation practices are currently being employed as a popular form of health promotion. While meditation programs draw inspiration from Buddhist textual sources for the benefits of meditation, these sources also acknowledge a wide range of other effects beyond health-related outcomes. The Varieties of Contemplative Experience stud...

Citations

... The type of meditation practiced by the teachers was also not referred. The occurrence of adverse or unpleasant effects of MBI, an issue to consider (Britton et al., 2021), was only reported by Pérez-Aranda et al. (2019b). ...
... The seven categories of meditationrelated adverse effects that previously had been identified were applied: cognitive, perceptual, affective, somatic, conative sense of self and social. 20 The participants could choose every category if the experience was of that nature. ...
... Notably, while ample studies support the positive impact of mindfulness training, some caution that mindfulness-based intervention as with any other intervention is not universally beneficial (Britton, 2019;Grant & Schwartz, 2011). Instead, its effects show a non-monotonic, inverted U-shaped trajectory, suggesting factors such as individual differences (Rojiani et al., 2017), social contexts (Lindahl et al., 2019), or an individual and context interaction modulate the direction and magnitude of these benefits. On one end, those who have a current diagnosis of any psychiatric disorders are discouraged from participating in mindfulness-based interventions because such interventions, if not designed to address specific clinical issues, can lead to deterioration of the disorders (Santorelli, 2014). ...
... Though such awareness is central to the "exposure" aspect of mindfulness practice, it can overwhelm the participant (Treleaven, 2018). Several studies have pointed to the potential harmful effects of meditation in general, and the invitation to be open to all experience in particular, arising from the reactivation of traumatic memories (Baer et al., 2019;Lindahl et al., 2017). Although several randomized trials have shown that adverse effects, when reported, are no more common in MBPs than in control groups (Hirshberg et al., 2020;Wong et al., 2018), questions have been raised about the definition of harm in these studies. ...