David Hall's research while affiliated with University of Liverpool and other places

Publications (25)

Chapter
Why should we be interested in the place of volunteering in transitions from higher education to work? As Ulrich Teichler commented in a report compiled for the International Labour Office, in the 1990s and beyond ‘transition from higher education to employment has become more complex and protracted’ (1999, p. 5). There is a widespread perception o...
Article
Full-text available
Student volunteering is currently being promoted through the Higher Education Active Community Fund, which runs to August 2004 and may be extended further. This development of higher education’s ‘third mission’ has strong links with the government’s agenda for citizenship and the active community. This initiative appears to have taken little accoun...
Chapter
Because evaluation aims both to understand a program and to provide a judgement on it, the findings need to communicate clearly to the audience or audiences who will receive the report and, it is hoped, act on it. This communication can be done orally or in written form. Oral communication is less formal than a written report; it can be used at a f...
Book
Evaluation is a large and growing field with applications to a wide range of disciplines - including sociology, social work, social policy, psychology, health, nursing, education, community development, etc. This text explains the different perspectives and needs of researchers and practitioners at the local level in plain, accessible English and d...
Chapter
This chapter concentrates on the writing of a report for the academic department, rather than for the client organisation. The reason for proposing this methodology report is to supplement the client report by recording the insights derived from the practice of research. The aims are to provide context, reflexive remarks and evaluation of learning....
Chapter
This chapter deals with a key stage in developing a research project. It is essential that the project is properly set up from the beginning, so that you and the organisation you are working with are clear about what is expected. The aim is to negotiate an agreement which is acceptable to all parties, including the academic supervisor. The agreemen...
Chapter
The aim of this chapter is to encourage students to undertake their own research project, by outlining the steps to be taken which are detailed in later chapters. In doing so, we set out a philosophy for research based on participation with local groups and organisations and present an ethical basis for research practice which emphasises respect fo...
Chapter
Finally, we look at other sources of information which may be considered to supplement, rather than take the place of, the survey or ethnographic methods detailed above. In addition to published data such as census information there are organisational records of particular relevance to evaluation studies, and various personal records such as diarie...
Chapter
In this chapter you are taken through the different stages of writing a report for your client organisation. For the client, this is the outcome of your project, so it is important that the report meets their needs. Various types of report are explained and suggestions made about presentation and content. Where recommendations are made, they should...
Chapter
The last two chapters have dealt with research based on the questionnaire survey. Data can also be collected using the techniques of in-depth interviewing. This chapter considers the issues and practical steps you need to understand to conduct your research. You will learn about ‘semi-structured’ interviews as a general method, as well as specific...
Chapter
This chapter deals mainly with how to handle material generated by semi-structured, in-depth interviews focused on the particular topics required by the client. The analysis of qualitative data from interviews, case studies, oral and life histories will be considered, as well as how it can be presented in a report and still retain the richness or d...
Chapter
Practical social research involves negotiation with a client organisation about the purpose of the research project, its intended outcome and also the research methods to be used. On this last point the supervisor and you the student are the ‘experts’ who will have to decide how to carry out the research. You can discuss with the client organisatio...
Chapter
This book is written as a guide to students wanting to become involved in practical social research in the local community. In particular it is addressed to undergraduate students participating in small-scale research projects as part of their assessed work, though we hope that the book will also be useful for anyone who wants a general understandi...
Chapter
In this and the next three chapters you will learn about using research methods from the scientific and ethnographic traditions, beginning with the questionnaire. The questionnaire is a tried and tested method of generating information. This chapter looks at the issues involved in creating a questionnaire, and at the various forms that structured q...
Chapter
This chapter takes the research agreement one step further by showing how it is expanded into a research brief. To do this, decisions have to be made on research strategy, and methods must be elaborated in greater detail. The research brief is a document which proves to the organisation that you have a clear view of the research objectives and how...
Chapter
The aim of this chapter is to enable you to handle data efficiently and to ‘tell a story’ with the data that has been produced. It deals primarily with survey information which can be counted and measured, summarised in terms of averages and percentages and displayed in graphs and tables. The level of statistical knowledge covered here is quite bas...
Article
El texto explica las diferentes perspectivas y necesidades para desarrollar modelos colaborativos de evaluación de proyectos de investigación social a nivel local.

Citations

... Therefore, the sorting of data was initially carried out within these pre-constructed categories (challenges, effective practice). Qualitative data matrix tables were drawn up for the interview data and then for the focus group data to help 'see' the data, aid comparison across the data sets and enhance rigour (Silverman, 2001in Hall & Hall, 2004. Across the pre-constructed categories initial codes were generated for example, 'knowledge base', 'multi-agency working' based on frequency and intensity. ...
... Some critical theorists have criticized the interpretative approach for its focus upon the micro to the detriment of the macro. They claim that interpretative research is conservative by adopting such a narrow approach, as it fails to note structural causes (Hall and Hall 1996). In response, Frank tried to develop links between micro and macro analysis. ...
... A growing number of studies demonstrated that calculated interests (e.g. résumé building) may be an important motivation for "volunteering" (e.g., Handy et al., 2010;Katz & Rosenberg, 2005;Matthews, Green, Hall & Hall, 2009;Mesch, 1998). However, these studies still perceive engagement in "volunteering" as resulting from a determination by an autonomous subject, whose calculated interests and motivations can be delineated and researched, while tending to neglect the ways in which individuals navigate between different and sometimes contradictory motivations (e.g. ...
... However, hybridity is not only a characteristic of the organizational and institutional settings in which volunteering takes place: it is also expressed in the conflation of various motivations, discourses, and practices that can be discerned in the participation patterns at nongovernmental organizations. A growing number of studies demonstrated that calculated interests (e.g., r esum e building) may be an important motivation for "volunteering" (e.g., Handy et al., 2010;Katz & Rosenberg, 2005;Matthews, Green, Hall, & Hall, 2009;Mesch, Tschirhart, Perry, & Lee, 1998). However, these studies still perceive engagement in "volunteering" as resulting from a determination by an autonomous subject, whose calculated interests and motivations can be delineated and researched, while tending to neglect the ways in which individuals navigate between different and sometimes contradictory motivations (e.g., Fleischer, 2011). ...
... As students encounter academic literature that highlights discrimination, racism and the complicity of settled white western modernity in poverty and injustice, time in community highlights civil society and government action. Hall et al. (2004) argue that the classroom is best placed to navigate this new terrain whereas student volunteering alone might not be grounded in reflection. Taylor (2013) invites her students to describe the resistance to difficult knowledge. ...
... In particular, I eschewed the use of interviews as I felt that naturalistic observation would provide more reliable data than individuals' posthoc accounts of judgements. In a study of sense making, it is a prerequisite that I acknowledge my own positionality and the impact that this will have on my own sense making as a researcher (Hall and Hall 2004). As I am a Social Worker with considerable experience in the field, I did not adopt a position of faux naivety but favoured a position of subtle realism (Hammersley 1992) which took into account my own influence on the research. ...