David H. Kesler's research while affiliated with Rhodes College and other places

Publications (6)

Article
Aquatic phantom midge larvae (Chaoborus punctipennis) exhibit diel vertical migration (DVM) in response to fish visual predation, remaining in deeper waters during the day and ascending nocturnally to feed. Light penetration into the water column and dissolved oxygen concentrations are hypothesized to determine the depths where larvae are found dur...
Article
Full-text available
The lengths of marked specimens of the freshwater mussel, Eastern Elliptio (Elliptio complanata [Lightfoot 1786]), were monitored annually in 3 lakes in Rhode Island, USA, from 1991 to 2005. Mussels growing in Worden Pond showed a change in mean shell length of only 4.3 mm over 14 y, whereas mussel growth in 2 nearby lakes was 3 to 8× greater than...
Article
This study tested the hypothesis that filter-feeding organisms have higher condition indices downstream from a swamp than those upstream at a location not receiving lentic drainage. Sampling was performed monthly in the Wolf River in western Tennessee, USA from February to August, 2002. Condition of the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea (Müller), was...
Article
1. North American lacustrine freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae) are one of the world’s most imperilled groups of organisms. Knowledge of their age structure and longevity is needed for the understanding and management of mussels. Current methods for age estimation in freshwater mussels are insufficient and may have resulted in an erroneous vi...
Article
The aquatic insect larvae of Chaoborus punctipennis exhibit diel vertical migration, remaining in deeper waters during the day and ascending at night. This behavior reduces visual predation on the larvae, but incurs costs. We attempted to determine if patterns existed in the vertical migration of C. punctipennis larvae related to changes in water o...
Article
1. The objective of this study was to compare, in freshwater bivalves, growth rates inferred from the spacing of internal annuli to those obtained directly by measuring annual changes in shell length. 2. The unionid mussels studied were Elliptio complanata and Lampsilis radiata from a pond in the north-eastern U.S.A. Age was inferred from internal...

Citations

... The Wolf River rises in the Holly Springs National Forest, Mississippi. It drains a large portion of Memphis and Shelby County, Tennessee, before discharging into the Mississippi River near downtown Memphis [13]. In this paper, we delineated the Wolf River watershed based on the stream gage USGS 07031650. ...
... Chaoborus feed during these migrations, with individuals initiating feeding at night when ascending into surface waters, where they continue feeding until moving back into the hypolimnion or benthic region as dawn approaches (Swift 1976;Pastorok 1981;Jeong and Park 2010). Chaoborus also engage in DVM behavior to avoid predation (Wissel et al. 2003;Barth et al. 2014), continuing to reside in the bottom waters during the day even during hypoxia (Stratton and Kesler 2007;Weisser et al. 2018). Use of the hypoxic bottom waters likely further reduces their risk to predation, as individuals are expected to be inaccessible to fish predators that are intolerant of low dissolved oxygen concentrations (DO) at this time. ...
... The surface migration of D. mendotae at least an hour before sunset and after sunrise could partially be explained by the angle of lightand subsequently the amount of light that penetrates the ice-which is lower in winter-thus decreasing the risk of predation at an earlier time than summer. Further, predatory Chaoborus exhibited typical migration patterns-they only appeared in the water column after dark (Rine and Kesler, 2001); therefore, we suspect decreased predation risk for D. mendotae in surface waters was narrowly limited to these times of low-angle light. ...
... Hydrobiologia Kesler et al. (2007) found that food limitation in lakes resulted in reduced growth and body condition in Elliptio complanata. Ferreira-Rodriguez et al. (2018) suggested a similar impact of the invasive Corbicula fluminea on native mussels. ...
... In addition, there are several shortcomings to consider for this study related to the data collected and used in the analysis. Age estimates that rely on shell annuli are known to be inaccurate in some cases and may result in the underestimation of mussel age (Downing, Shostell & Downing, 1992;Kesler & Downing, 1997). There was no assessment of the quality of the data that were included in the database; data were simply recorded as presented. ...
... Moreover, free larval glochidia are extremely sensitive to low pH (Pynnönen, 1995), which may limit their ability to appropriately parasitize fish hosts in addition to their increased mortality. Although freshwater mussels are long-lived (Anthony et al., 2001;Ercan et al., 2013), the duration of the juvenile stage is long. Therefore, low pH and high Fe concentration peaks may be harmful to juveniles and contribute to the low recruitment in the environment. ...