David Galula's scientific contributions

Citations

... As such, it is primarily a political struggle, in which both sides use armed force to create space for their political, economic and influence activities to be effective." As noted earlier, counter-terrorism falls within four models: defensive, reconciliatory, criminal-justice, and war (Pratt, 2010), which invariably fit into the broader categories of COIN identified by Galula (1964). What seems to be the only difference between the two concepts is that while counter-terrorism focuses more narrowly on combating the tactics and strategy of terrorism and those who employ it, counter-insurgency is a broader category of responses to political violence carried out by minority groups, both terroristic and otherwise (Pratt, 2010). ...
... An autonomous territory, by definition, is one in which the forces of state repression and corporate extractivism do not have a decisive foothold; they must organize a process of reinvading such territory. Given the scaled response that is at the center of counterinsurgency methodology (Galula 1964;Kilcullen 2010), a counterinsurgency lens explains the relation of repressive force and the ecological crisis much better than implicitly racist arguments about the health of democracy in the Global South. And as we shall see in the next section, indubitably democratic governments in the Global North seem most likely to use lethal force against their citizens precisely in the context of those struggles that are in the process of winning land autonomy. ...
... Consequently, these studies generally imply that modern battlefield effectiveness requires a complex pattern of force employment, which Biddle (2004) terms the "modern system." In the range of possible types of conflict, many scholars argue that counterinsurgency is particularly complex (see, for example, Galula (1964); Jones (2017); Kilcullen (2010); Trinquier (1961)). In his classic treatise on insurgency, Mao describes the importance of adaptation as such: "Guerrilla commanders adjust their operations to the enemy situation, to the terrain, and to prevailing local conditions. ...
... Insurgency, otherwise known as the commonest form of armed conflict, poses the greatest threat to global peace and security in the twenty-first century. 2 Armed conflict, before and during the Cold War period, was viewed as interbellum between independent states. 3 However, since the Cold War ended, the experience of armed conflict has transformed into the emergence of non-state actors against their nation-state. ...