David Driskell's research while affiliated with Cornell University and other places

Publications (5)

Article
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This comment discusses the lack of attention given to children at the June 2006 World Urban Forum in Vancouver. Although progress was made in terms of the recognition given to youth at this Forum, only two out of 162 events focused on the concerns of children under the age of 15 - a group that constitutes almost one-third of the world's population....
Article
The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child contains a set of “participation clauses” which are leading members of development agencies, municipal offices, and community organizations to incorporate children and youth into community planning. The Growing Up in Cities project of UNESCO provides a model for doing this, with a focus on lo...
Article
This paper describes the difficult relationships among those implementing an action research project with children in a low-income settlement in Bangalore (India), the distant and unresponsive bureaucracy of an international funding agency, and the authoritarian management of the NGO through whom its money was channelled. This case study highlights...

Citations

... External resources, including government, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), communities and family play an essential role in fostering resilience and therefore should not be ignored (Driskell et al, 2001). The lack of external resources (e.g., family, social and community support) may explain why some women stay in abusive relationships (Hyland, 2014). ...
... With young people, the participatory design process has been used to create youthfocused spaces including outdoor learning environments, playgrounds, skate parks, school yards and schools themselves. Literature on youth participation in urban design and environmental decision making employs case studies to focus on importance of on equitable and thoughtful engagement processes (Chawla, Bartlett, Driskell, Hart, & Olofsson, 2006;Chawla & Heft, 2002;R. Hart, 2001;R. ...
... A less-discussed challenge of public participation in urban design is that of youth involvement. Young people are under-represented in consultations of all kinds, and their exclusion from decision-making processes often leaves this demographic socially and politically marginalised (Chawla et al., 2005). Despite more recent efforts from practitioners to include children in public participation (Bornat & Shaw, 2019;Tan, 2019;Wood et al., 2019), this remains a significant challenge to all stakeholders in participatory processes. ...
... 15). With access to resources, connections, and opportunities to deconstruct, and reimagine the systems in our world, youth and adults can engage with/in research processes that contribute to personal transformation (Cammarota and Fine 2010) and to creating a sustainable future and bringing their innovative ideas to fruition (Chawla and Driskell 2006). ...
... This is especially important for those who live in areas of socioeconomic disadvantage, which are frequently the subjects of major public policy interventions such as housing estate regeneration programs. Housing estate regeneration can affect children's lives in terms of their living conditions and environmental surroundings, and their sense of safety, belonging, place, identity and community (Driskell, Bannerjee & Chawla, 2001). However, children's voices are seldom heard in such programs, even though the local built environment is where children spend most of their time and changes to it can have profound and long-lasting effects on their lives. ...