Daren C. Brabham's research while affiliated with University of Southern California and other places

Publications (20)

Article
Full-text available
Ideas that rise to the top in crowdsourcing platforms are assumed to succeed because they are perceived to be the best ideas, but questions about the factors that influence the outperformance of one solution over another remain underexplored. The Peer Vetted Ideas model is proposed as an explanation of elements that affect performance in crowdsourc...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing from communication as design and the spirit of technology, this study investigated the political values embedded in consultative layer companies, with particular attention to the influence of normative deliberative democratic ideals in tech design. Interviews with the founders of consultative layer tech startups explored (a) founders' visio...
Chapter
Crowdsourcing is an online, distributed problem solving and production model where organizations tap the collective intelligence of online communities. A joining of top-down management processes with bottom-up open innovation processes, crowdsourcing can be used by organizations to solve four general types of problems related to information managem...
Article
Crowdfunding platforms, such as Kickstarter and Indiegogo, have been the focus of considerable popular press news coverage in the past few years, with stories emphasizing how crowdfunding can bring indie creative projects into being through monetary contributions from several individuals online. As a method for financing small or risky artistic pro...
Chapter
Full-text available
This study operationalizes different motivational categories to participate 7 in crowdsourcing and tests them with a series of advertisements in different 8 countries. We found that internalized extrinsic motivations were more appealing to 9 individuals overall and that results differed across countries, which is novel in 10 research about crowdsou...
Article
Full-text available
Social media research has tended to focus on stand-out cases and has made use of big data methods to make claims about human experience and sociality. This commentary urges researchers to consider the everyday, normal experiences of most social media users, to consider the place of social media in a broader social context, and to consider marrying...
Article
Full-text available
Crowdsourcing is an online, distributed, problem-solving, and production model that uses the collective intelligence of networked communities for specific purposes. Although its use has benefited many sectors of society, it has yet to be fully realized as a method for improving public health. This paper defines the core components of crowdsourcing...
Article
Crowdsourcing is a method for harnessing the collective intelligence of online communities to solve specific problems or produce goods. Largely known as a business model, crowdsourcing has begun to make inroads as a supplemental public participation tool for governance, as a way to engage citizens in the business of government functions. Validating...
Article
Governments increasingly turn to the Internet to aid in transparency, accountability, and public participation activities, and there is growing interest in innovative online problem-solving models to serve the public good. One such model, the crowdsourcing model, leverages the collective intelligence of online communities for specific purposes. Und...
Article
As Internet-based tactics become commonplace in public relations practice, targeting campaigns to specific publics becomes more challenging. The global reach of the Internet challenges a public relations practitioner's confidence that an online message targeted at a set of specific demographics will reach only the intended audience. Internet-based...
Article
This paper analyzes the discourse of amateurism as it relates to crowdsourcing, a now relatively common model where organizations engage online communities to design goods and solve problems. This paper's findings are twofold: (1) crowdsourcing is discussed in the popular press as a process driven by amateurs and hobbyists, yet empirical research o...
Article
Crowdsourcing is an online, distributed problem-solving and production model already in use by businesses such as Threadless.com, iStockphoto.com, and InnoCentive.com. This model, which harnesses the collective intelligence of a crowd of Web users through an open-call format, has the potential for government and non-profit applications. Yet, in ord...
Article
In late 2009, the Next Stop Design project was launched to test the crowdsourcing model in a public participation context for transit planning. Crowdsourcing is an online, distributed problem solving and production model largely in use for business. It leverages the collective intelligence of online communities by soliciting ideas and solutions for...
Article
Public involvement is a central concern for urban planners, but the challenge for planners is how best to implement such programs, given many difficulties inherent in the typical public involvement process. The medium of the Web enables us to harness collective intellect among a population in ways face-to-face planning meetings cannot. This article...
Article
Crowdsourcing is an online, distributed problem solving and production model already in use by for-profit organizations such as Threadless, iStockphoto, and InnoCentive. Speculation in Weblogs and wisdom of crowds theory assumes a diverse crowd engaged in crowdsourcing labor. Furthermore, and as crowdsourcing is in some ways similar to open source...
Article
Crowdsourcing is an online, distributed problem-solving and production model that has emerged in recent years. Notable examples of the model include Threadless, iStockphoto, InnoCentive, the Goldcorp Challenge, and user-generated advertising contests. This article provides an introduction to crowdsourcing, both its theoretical grounding and exempla...

Citations

... Since 2008, through the Civic Tech boom, a plethora of digital tools have aspired to revisit existing institutional processes [26,27]. These tools act as modern communication methods between authorities and citizens and deliver more direct, efficient, transparent, and fairer decision-making according to the founders of various Civic Tech companies [28]. This rise of Civic Tech coincided with the transition to a social web, namely Web 2.0 [29]. ...
... The complex interactions among issue salience and partnership signaling stand in contrast to the tech-optimism argument and show that digital platforms do not necessarily lead to a critical mass of contributions. The study thus answers the recent call from organizational communication scholars (Guth & Brabham, 2017;Stohl, 2014) to further examine the importance of communication between crowdsourcing sponsoring organizations and crowd members in encouraging public participation. ...
... Crowdsourcing A model of labour in which an organization turns to crowds (i.e., ill-defined members of the general public) to obtain desired data, goods, or services (Brabham 2013, Ghezzi et al. 2017, McAfee and Brynjolfsson 2017, Poblet et al. 2017, Zhao and Zhu 2014 Many business, public and even individual initiatives, such as crowdfunding, ideation, contest, citizen science, crisis management or online employment platforms ...
Citing chapter
... Venture capitalists, banks, and similar lenders generally finance ideas with a mainstream market focus (Brabham 2017;Smith 2015). This approach has left limited support for niche or high-risk ventures, i.e., those that require longer horizons to pay off or resonate with minorities and vulnerable groups (Lagna and Ravishankar 2021;Meliou et al. 2019). ...
... Through the diffusion of personal ICTs which allowed people to volunteer in data gathering processes via mapping and sharing applications, crowdsourcing appeared in the public eye as the ultimate witchcraft able to provide a new (virtual and, thus, potentially infinite) space for participation, collective decision-making, peer-to-peer collaboration and social innovation. Therefore, crowdsourcing has often been enthusiastically welcomed as the appropriate paradigmatic model to stimulate citizens' interest in public discussion [16] via the provision of catchy and game-like applications for information gathering, large-scale data analysis and ideation solutions [17,18], problem-solving and preferences expression apps [5]. These last fuelled the emergence of an imaginary of democratic, non-hierarchical and decentralised future decision-making processes based on the access potentialities provided by the web infrastructure [19][20][21][22]. ...
... On the other hand, social media has also made it harder for organizations to communicate with their publics because of instant changes in the social environment, the potential for "unexpected publics" online (e.g., Brabham, 2012) to arise, and the difficulty of appealing to different publics with diverse interests and values at the same time. Because more and more people have access to social media and many tend to be vocal about their opinions, organizations can no longer assume that their policies or positions can meet every public's need. ...
... It seeks to bring power relations into the analysis to examine how power relations are established and re-produced through language (Downing and Dron, 2020). CDA is 'problem-oriented, and thus necessarily interdisciplinary' and helps to focus on 'de-mystifying ideologies and power through the systematic and retroductable investigation of semiotic data (written, spoken or visual)' (Brabham, 2015). Andre Brock (2016) integrates analysis of technological artefacts and user discourse, framed by cultural theory, to unpack semiotic and material connections between form, function, belief, and meaning of information and communication technologies. ...
... In the consumer creativity domain, Dahl and Moreau (2007) and Fernandes and Remelhe (2016) showed that consumers participate in creative activities that entail product use for intrinsic reasons-personal accomplishment, to learn, to reinforce their self-identities and express themselves, to enjoy and achieve engagement and relaxation through the creative process -and extrinsic reasons, such as publicly demonstrating accomplishments and for community motives (sharing knowledge/opinions with others with common interests). Similarly, research into individuals' motivations to participate in online crowdsource contests and new product development projects found that their main external drivers were economic rewards, social recognition, social interaction with like-minded peers and career advancement, and that self-expression, learning and problem solving were their main intrinsic drivers (Brabham 2012; Estellés-Arolas and González-Ladrón-De-Guevara 2012; Hoyer et al. 2010;Hutter et al. 2011;Roth, Brabham, and Lemoine 2015). In a public sector setting, Parvanta, Roth, and Keller (2013) found that online users engage in social and health communication crowdsource projects to have fun, to experience the fulfilment of performing something that contributes to benefit society, and to earn money. ...
... In addition, the types of crowdsourcing identified so far, including typology proposals by several studies [34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41][42] allow for better understanding of crowdsourcing initiatives in the context of business organisations, industries, non-profit organisations or public sector entities excluding research processes. Which is more, crowdsourcing is per se connected with organisational problem solving, creating innovations and generating ideas. ...
... A crowdsourcing platform enables its users, aka crowdsourcers, to access a large, relatively open, and often rapidly evolving talents, skills, and tangible resources, aka crowdsourcees, to fulfill tasks on their behalf. Crowdsourcing is widely used to address novel challenges in different fields such as intelligent transportation systems, cyber security, and software engineering [27][28][29][30][31][32][33][34]. However, in financial engineering, its applications are mainly limited to crowdfunding. ...