Danielle Gaucher's research while affiliated with The University of Winnipeg and other places

Publications (27)

Article
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Many First Nations homes in Canada do not have adequate water services. This issue is unlikely to be resolved without public pressure on the government. Thus, we investigated one strategy to increase non-Indigenous Canadians’ support for government action: framing water as a human right. Informed by a partnership with Indigenous community members a...
Article
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Political solidarity is often key to addressing societal injustice. Yet social and political psychology are without a common definition or comprehensive measure of this construct, complicating advancements in this burgeoning field. To address these gaps, we advance a novel understanding and measure of this construct. We conceptualized political sol...
Article
We review conceptual and empirical contributions to system justification theory over the last fifteen years, emphasizing the importance of an experimental approach and consideration of context. First, we review the indirect evidence of the system justification motive via complimentary stereotyping. Second, we describe injunctification as direct evi...
Article
How can agents of social change increase public support for minority communities? In three studies, we demonstrate how heightened feelings of community connection can predict support for addressing injustice in minority communities. Community connection, when experimentally evoked (Study 1) or measured (Study 3), was associated with heightened supp...
Article
Complementing well-established antecedents of anti-migrant opinion (e.g., threat), we investigated how system-sanctioned ideologies—that is, the collection of beliefs and values espoused by the government in power—are linked with migrant stereotypes. Using Canada as a case study, across three waves of national survey data (N = 1,080), we found that...
Article
The number of refugees across the globe is at an alarming high and is expected to continue to rise for the foreseeable future. As a result, finding durable solutions for refugees has become a major challenge worldwide. The literature reviewed and policy implications discussed in this article are based on the premise that one of the major solutions...
Conference Paper
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Safety initiatives focus disproportionately on the travel dangers facing women. These initiatives may be well intentioned, but why the almost singular emphasis on danger facing female travelers? We hypothesized that hostile sexism underlies this imbalance, driven by a desire to prevent women from traveling. Participants read about a male or female...
Article
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Liberals and conservatives disagree about obeying authorities, with conservatives holding the more positive views. We suggest that reactions to conservative authorities, rather than to obedience itself, are responsible for the division. Past findings that conservatives favor obedience uniformly confounded obedience with conservative authorities. We...
Article
We suggest that people privilege explanations relying on inherent rather than contingent factors not only because of an innate cognitive tendency to monitor reality, but because doing so satisfies the desire to perceive the societal status quo as legitimate. In support, we describe experimental studies linking the activation of system justification...
Article
Modern society is rife with inequality. People's interpretations of these inequalities, however, vary considerably: Different people can interpret, for example, the existing gender gap in wages as being the result of systemic discrimination, or as being the fair and natural result of genuine differences between men and women. Here, we examine one f...
Article
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When presenting themselves to others, people attempt to create the impression that they possess socially desired traits. Verbally claiming to possess such traits is relatively simple, but making good on one’s promises by actually behaving in kind is more challenging. In particular, lower self-esteem individuals' relational insecurity may undermine...
Article
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Baumeister, Tice, and Hutton proposed that individuals with low self-esteem (LSEs) adopt a more cautious, self-protective self-presentational style than individuals with high self-esteem (HSEs). The authors predicted that LSEs' self-protectiveness leads them to be less expressive--less revealing of their thoughts and feelings--with others than HSEs...
Chapter
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Morton Deutsch (Social Justice Research, 19, 7–41, 2006) identifies “awakening a sense of injustice” as a necessary precursor of social change. Building on Deutsch’s theorizing, we propose that system justification, the motivation to defend and justify existing social, economic, and political institutions, and to derogate or dismiss alternatives to...
Article
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Social dominance theory (Sidanius & Pratto, 1999) contends that institutional-level mechanisms exist that reinforce and perpetuate existing group-based inequalities, but very few such mechanisms have been empirically demonstrated. We propose that gendered wording (i.e., masculine- and feminine-themed words, such as those associated with gender ster...
Article
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The authors draw on sociometer theory (e.g., Leary, 2004) and self-verification theory (e.g., Swann, 1997) to propose an expanded model of the regulatory function of self-esteem. The model suggests that people not only possess an acceptance signaling system that indicates whether relational value is high or low but also possess an epistemic signali...
Article
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The authors review experimental evidence that religious conviction can be a defensive source of compensatory control when personal or external sources of control are low. They show evidence that (a) belief in religious deities and secular institutions can serve as external forms of control that can compensate for manipulations that lower personal c...
Article
People prefer to perceive the world as just; however, the everyday experience of undeserved events challenges this perception.The authors suggest that one way people rationalize these daily experiences of unfairness is by means of a compensatory bias. People make undeserved events more palatable by endorsing the notion that outcomes naturally balan...
Article
How powerful is the status quo in determining people's social ideals? The authors propose (a) that people engage in injunctification, that is, a motivated tendency to construe the current status quo as the most desirable and reasonable state of affairs (i.e., as the most representative of how things should be); (b) that this tendency is driven, at...
Article
We propose that people protect the belief in a controlled, nonrandom world by imbuing their social, physical, and metaphysical environments with order and structure when their sense of personal control is threatened. We demonstrate that when personal control is threatened, people can preserve a sense of order by (a) perceiving patterns in noise or...
Article
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People's expectations of acceptance often come to create the acceptance or rejection they anticipate. The authors tested the hypothesis that interpersonal warmth is the behavioral key to this acceptance prophecy: If people expect acceptance, they will behave warmly, which in turn will lead other people to accept them; if they expect rejection, they...
Article
In this brief reply, we explore the ways in which a psychological theory of ideology as motivated social cognition (e.g., Jost, Glaser, Kruglanski, & Sulloway, 2003a8. Jost , J. T. , Glaser , J. , Kruglanski , A. W. and Sulloway , F. J. 2003a . Exceptions that prove the rule: Using a theory of motivated social cognition to account for ideological i...
Article
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The authors propose that the high levels of support often observed for governmental and religious systems can be explained, in part, as a means of coping with the threat posed by chronically or situationally fluctuating levels of perceived personal control. Three experiments demonstrated a causal relation between lowered perceptions of personal con...

Citations

... Social psychologists define solidarity as one's desire to work with other individuals or groups for social change with a sense of common cause or social change commitment (Neufeld, Starzyk, & Gaucher, 2019;Subašić, Reynolds, & Turner, 2008). Moreover, current approaches classify motivations for solidarity as ingroup-focused, outgroup-focused, personal, and morality motivations (see Radke, Kutlaca, Siem, Wright, & Becker, 2020). ...
... "system threat", "system dependence", "system inescapability", "system justification theory", "system justification," and "powerlessness fosters system justification", and the most recent search was performed on February 22, 2022. These terms were used, because the system threat, system dependence, and system inescapability constitute the most widely cited situational moderators of system justifying tendencies as reported in Friesen et al. (2019). We hoped that including "system justification" and "system justification theory" as search terms would capture a lot of other studies that were inspired by SJT but that did not necessarily use manipulations meant to affect these three main situational moderators of system justification. ...
... People who feel connected to nature have a sense of kinship with other members of the natural world: Such people care for all members and view them as equals (Mayer & Frantz, 2004). People who feel connected to nature also tend to be more morally expansive (Crimston et al., 2016), because they feel more connected to other humans (Crimston et al., 2016;Lee et al., 2015) and a sense of connection to others is associated with intergroup support (Neufeld et al., 2018). Of course, the effect is likely bidirectional; it may be that exposure to nature causes greater moral concern for diverse entities and moral expansiveness causes people to feel connected to nature. ...
... The DBA model considers three factors: (1) Opinion updates, if the opinion of the network nodes is similar, the opinion can be updated according to the degree of acceptance, (2) Broken edge and reconnection, network nodes may disconnect some links with different opinions and then have a higher probability of linking with nodes with similar opinions. (3) Opinion changes, reasons for the change in opinion include change of mind due to unexpected key events, religious conversion [13,24], and change of opinion due to sudden changes in the environment (such as immigration) [25]. These three factors are integrated into the same model, resulting in a complex dynamic system. ...
... Furthermore, as described by Bourhis et al. (1997), the attitude of the receiving society played a role. Esses et al. (2017) summarized findings of earlier studies that found that negative attitudes and prejudices of receiving societies towards immigrant groups are predicted by the perception of threat (e.g., resource threat, threat of violence, or threat of the status quo; see Stephan et al., 2005). In fact, several participants had negative experiences with xenophobia, which led to the unpleasant feeling of not being accepted in German society. ...
... Children's in-class activities, especially using cooperative methods and children's taking individual responsibilities within the group, will increase their self-confidence which is necessary for their social belonging and will ensure that they do not experience the feeling of social exclusion by establishing sincere relationships. It is possible to give the jigsaw technique as an example for such an in-class activity which is useful for Social Studies courses (Neufeld, Matthes, Moulden, Friesen, & Gaucher, 2016). ...
... Ideologies, i.e. sets of belief systems that provide a reference framework for interpreting a context (Jost et al., 2009), represent a form of social cognition by which people fulfill psychological needs (Jost et al., 2003). System justification theory argues that individuals are motivated to justify the status quo, even at the expense of personal and group interest, and use ideologies to reduce uncertainty, avoid anxiety triggered by potential threats, and create a shared reality (Jost et al., 2009;Jost et al., 2015). In this vein, research has shown that threats, particularly terrorism salience, increase conservatism and system justification motives (Ullrich & Cohrs, 2007), while validating the institutions (Jost et al., 2004;Osborne et al., 2019). ...
... queer practices of building thick skin via offensive speech is similarly defined by the preservation and self-expression of a social identity. In this way, queer mock impoliteness also stands as an example of reclaiming offensive language, which has been studied and documented in relation to social justice targets, such as misogyny (Gaucher et al., 2015) and ableism (Smith, 2012). ...
... According to social identity theorizing (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), structural features such as permeability and legitimacy of status relations are important determinants how people construe existing intergroup inequality (Laurin et al., 2013;Oldmeadow & Fiske, 2012). For instance, whether people perceive the wealthy as competent or assertive-in securing their higher socioeconomic status-may be contingent on whether upward social mobility is possible (i.e., high in permeability) and whether the current state of society is fair and just (i.e., high in legitimacy). ...
... In contemporary Western countries, the liberal-conservative worldview distinction is so prominent and ubiquitous that it is often referred to as a "culture war" (Flanagan & Lee, 2003;Frimer et al., 2014Frimer et al., , p. 1205. Some political scientists argue that much of the political tensions of the world boil down to a struggle between liberal and conservative worldviews, also termed "left" and "right" (Noël & Thérien, 2008). 1 In recent years, this polarization has intensified in the United States and in Europe (Abramowitz & Saunders, 2005;Jost, 2006). ...