Daniel W. Phillips's research while affiliated with University of California, Santa Barbara and other places

Publications (4)

Article
When deciding where to draw the boundaries for electoral districts, officials often strive to ensure that communities of interest are not split up but kept wholly within those boundaries. But what constitutes a community of interest is vague, with legal and academic sources describing either a thematic region with shared demographic and land-use tr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We explore the idea of spatial lenses as pieces of software interpreting data sets in a particular spatial view of an environment. The lenses serve to prepare the data sets for subsequent analysis in that view. Examples include a network lens to view places in a literary text, or a field lens to interpret pharmacy sales in terms of seasonal allergy...
Article
Previous research has examined heuristics—simplified decision-making rules-of-thumb—for geospatial reasoning. This study examined at two locations the influence of beliefs about local coastline orientation on estimated directions to local and distant places; estimates were made immediately or after fifteen seconds. This study goes beyond well-known...
Article
Full-text available
Cognitive regions are regions in the mind, reflecting informal ways individuals and cultural groups organize their understanding of earth landscapes. Cognitive region boundaries are typically substantially vague and their membership functions are substantially variable - the transition from outside to inside the region is imprecise or vague, and di...

Citations

... Next to census-based variables, these parameters may encompass demographic factors [30,31]; the accessibility of urban resources and institutions [1,31]; and physical cues such as roads, large building complexes, or waters, e.g., [30,32]. Indeed, several attempts of aggregating across self-defined neighborhoods imply the existence of neighborhood boundaries and cores mutually shared by the majority of the local residents [28,30,31,[33][34][35]. These findings support the idea of using participatory GIS approaches in community-based planning and neighborhood revitalization programs [26,27], as well as with the assumption of a 'spatial collective intelligence' [36]. ...
... On this account, networks are one of a range of concepts needed for interpreting the environment and for reasoning with GIS. These concepts constitute conceptual "lenses" through which the environment can be studied independently of technical representations (Allen et al., 2016;Kuhn & Ballatore, 2015). Besides the base concept of location, allowing for metric distance assessments in space, Kuhn distinguished the following content concepts, which we interpret here in a broader research context: ...
... These geographic regions may have sharp, well-defined, and official boundaries (e.g., states and countries), or vague and more personally relevant, conceptual definitions (e.g., 'downtown' or 'west coast'), or they may be a combination of both (e.g., a neighborhood, which may have an official boundary defined by the city or county, but have a fuzzier border for individuals based on their personal categorization of location). The regions are often fuzzy and vague, with substantial variation between individuals -even for the same named region (e.g., the boundaries of Northern and Southern California; [27]). Additionally, another challenge in working with cognitive regions is that the precise definition of a named region may vary based on the way in which it is used or interacted with. ...