Daniel Otina's research while affiliated with University of Nairobi and other places

Publications (3)

Article
Full-text available
Seventy-three forest patches were assessed to determine the effects of human and natural impact on native forests along the Lower Tana River flood plains in Kenya between January and March 2001. Seventeen of these forests were within the Tana River Primate National Reserve (TRPNR) while 56 were outside the protected area. Cultivation and dyke const...
Article
Full-text available
Seventy-three forest patches were assessed to determine the effects of human and natural impact on native forests along the Lower Tana River flood plains in Kenya between January and March 2001. Seventeen of these forests were within the Tana River Primate National Reserve (TRPNR) while 56 were outside the protected area. Cultivation and dyke const...
Article
Full-text available
Seventy-three forest patches were assessed to determine the effects of human and natural impact on native forests along the Lower Tana River flood plains in Kenya between January and March 2001. Seventeen of these forests were within the Tana River Primate National Reserve (TRPNR) while 56 were outside the protected area. Cultivation and dyke const...

Citations

... The natural and anthropogenic driving forces were determined by review of previous forest research related studies, such as those of Mugagga et al. (2012); Ongugo et al. (2008); Petursson et al. (2013); ; and Were et al. (2013). In addition, a review was done to determine the environmental and socio-economic impacts of deforestation from the previous studies undertaken by Chakravarty et al. (2012); Dulo et al. (2010); Moinde-Fockler et al. (2007); Ngigi and Tateishi (2004); Nyongesa (2006) and Onywere et al. (2007). We also reviewed some of the key government policies and strategies, including Kenya Forest (Elgeiyo-Marakwet, 2013;Nandi, 2013;Trans-Nzoia, 2013;Uasin-gishu, 2013;WestPokot, 2013) that have been established and implemented to manage forest ecosystems in Kenya. ...
... P. rufomitratus saw a 5% decline between 1994 and 2001 at Tana River due to habitat loss (Karere et al. 2004). Anthropogenic and some natural causes resulted in a 34.5% reduction in forest cover in lower Tana River with areas inside the National Park being affected a little less than those outside the park (38% versus 29% reduction) (Moinde-Fockler et al. 2007;Wahungu et al. 2005). High genetic diversity was found within and between small populations in those fragmented forests, suggesting that the meta-population was large and fragmentation still recent relative to red colobus generation times; a Pliocene-Pleistocene interval bottleneck signature was also detected (Mbora & McPeek 2010). ...