Dalal Al-Abdulrazzak's research while affiliated with University of British Columbia - Vancouver and other places

Publications (22)

Article
The interaction between fishing gears and the marine environment define 'fisheries,' and the effect of gears on marine ecosystems and fish stocks has been the source of much debate. Here, we present the first summary of globally reconstructed fisheries catches by major gear categories for 1950-2014. We used the Sea Around Us reconstructed global ca...
Data
Top 47 species important to fisheries in the region. Species are ordered by average catch size (tonnes). (DOCX)
Data
Average annual total catch (in tonnes), Gulf catch (in tonnes) and proportion the latter represents overall by country. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Climate change–reflected in significant environmental changes such as warming, sea level rise, shifts in salinity, oxygen and other ocean conditions–is expected to impact marine organisms and associated fisheries. This study provides an assessment of the potential impacts on, and the vulnerability of, marine biodiversity and fisheries catches in th...
Data
Vulnerability of charismatic species to climate change impacts. (DOCX)
Data
Map of occurrence records for the 55 species that were modelled in the world’s oceans, including the Gulf. Source: Natural Earth version 4.0.0 - http://www.naturalearthdata.com/. Figure created using MATLAB. (TIF)
Data
Percent change in habitat suitability forall non-fish species in the Economic Exclusive Zones (EEZs) of the Gulf in 2090. Results are presented for the RCP 8.5 scenario and as average of the three niche models (BIOCLIM, NPPEN and ENFA). The error bars represent inter-model range. (TIF)
Data
Characteristics of all the priority marine species in the Gulf (ordered alphabetically) as obtained from FishBase [44], SeaLifeBase [45] and IUCN red list of threatened species [106]. TL–Trophic level. CR–Critically Endangered, EN–Endangered, VU–Vulnerable, NT–Near Threatened, LC–Least Concern, Data Deficient, NE–Not Evaluated. (DOCX)
Data
Fishery catch reconstruction for the Gulf. (DOCX)
Data
Vulnerability indicators: Exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Climate change-reflected in significant environmental changes such as warming, sea level rise, shifts in salinity, oxygen and other ocean conditions-is expected to impact marine organisms and associated fisheries. This study provides an assessment of the potential impacts on, and the vulnerability of, marine biodiversity and fisheries catches in th...
Article
Full-text available
The speed and scale of human impacts on marine species, such as climate change and exploitation for international markets, coupled with a poor regulatory regime and lack of enforcement, make it especially difficult to protect marine species beyond areas of national jurisdiction. Yet as the number of multilateral treaties continues to grow, the decl...
Article
Retrospective estimates of historic abundances and distributions of marine organisms are crucial to understanding the anthropogenic impacts on the structure and species of coastal ecosystems, especially in the case of vulnerable species such as the Dugong (Dugong dugon). The Persian/Arabian Gulf is home to the second largest Dugong population in th...
Article
Fisheries formed the basis of the Gulf's economy for hundreds of years, and yet present-day statistical catch data remain inaccurate. When estimated, these catches often result in distinctly different baselines for historical catches, raising questions about how closely officially reported data resemble reality and the sustainability of certain man...
Chapter
Global fisheries catch statistics are often incomplete. The contribution of many sectors, including small-scale fisheries, illegal catches, and discards are frequently absent from or underreported in statistics submitted annually by member countries of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). This incomplete accounting in officia...
Article
There has been a growing interest in the potential of Google Earth for scientific inquiries, and our previous paper (Al-Abdulrazzak and Pauly, 2014. Managing fisheries from space: Google Earth improves estimates of distant fish catches. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 71: 450–454) on weirs and their catch in the Persian Gulf is a case in point. Gar...
Article
Full-text available
Amid declining shark populations because of overfishing, a burgeoning shark watching industry, already well established in some locations, generates benefits from shark protection. We compile reported economic benefits at shark watching locations and use a meta-analytical approach to estimate benefits at sites without available data. Results sugges...
Article
Global fisheries are overexploited worldwide, yet crucial catch statistics reported to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) by member countries remain unreliable. Recent advances in remote-sensing technology allow us to view fishing practices from space and mitigate gaps in catch reporting. Here, we use Google Earth to count intertidal fishi...
Article
Full-text available
Historical data are essential in fisheries management and conservation, especially for species that suffered significant population declines prior to ecological data collection. Within the field of historical marine ecology, studies have relied on anecdotal evidence, such as written accounts by explorers and interviews of different generations of r...
Article
Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are an important tool for the conservation of marine species and ecosystems. Yet despite the significant differences between marine and terrestrial systems in terms of their critical ecological processes, stresses, and relationships with cultural systems, methods used to characterize levels of protection for biological...

Citations

... Like many shrimp species, mantis shrimp are benthic organisms and intensively fished by demersal trawls. Due to poor selectivity, especially by the codend in which most selection takes place (Glass, 2000), demersal trawling often induces serious bycatch and discard problems (Cashion et al., 2018). To address these issues, numerous gear modifications have been designed, tested, and evaluated. ...
... Sea warming can have direct effects on fish diversity and fishery catches (Neuheimer et al. 2011;Hannah et al. 2013;Pinsky et al. 2013). Future projections show that local extinctions would be experienced throughout the Gulf, with the highest reductions in the number of species and future catch potential are expected to be along the coast of the western side of the Gulf, including Bahrain, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and UAE (Wabnitz et al. 2018). Also, the effects of a further increase in sea temperature extend to essential fish habitats like coral reefs. ...
... The marine environmental risk of different pollutants, such as oil, trace metals, debris, plastics, and desalination plant effluents have also been highlighted (Evtushenko et al., 2018;Ghayebzadeh et al., 2020;Sharifinia et al., 2019). Moreover, climate change impacts in synergy with these anthropogenic activities have unprecedentedly raised the vulnerability of biodiversity and marine ecosystem services in the Persian Gulf (Wabnitz et al., 2018). Bandar Abbas city is the capital of Hormozgan province and is located in the north of the Strait of Hormuz. ...
... Attention has been called to the current deteriorating state of marine ecosystems (Blau and Green, 2015;Hattam et al., 2015;Pauli and Corbis, 2015). Improved governance has been touted to play a crucial role in halting the continuing and pressing marine challenges and developing a sustainable future for coastal and oceanic economies (Tarmizi, 2010;Al-Abdulrazzak et al., 2017). Töpfer et al. (2014) corroborate this argument, acknowledging that ocean governance is now at a critical point where existing institutions need to be redesigned to address current pressing problems. ...
... For example, in Australia, the estimated rate of decline averaged about 8.7% per year between 1962 and 1999, resulting in a 97% reduction in initial catch rates over a 38-year period [17]. The largest populations today are found along the coasts of Australia (~10,000 dugongs) [18], followed by the Arabian/Persian Gulf (~6000) [19,20], Red Sea (~2000) [6], New Caledonia (~898) [18,21], and Mozambique (~300) [6]. Dugongs have completely disappeared from areas around Japan (Sakishima Shoto islands), Hong Kong, Maldives, Mauritius, Philippines, Taiwan, Cambodia, and Vietnam. ...
... Few extend beyond the 1960s, even in the North Atlantic, where data collection has been the most comprehensive. Fisheries records from most other parts of the world are notoriously worse, characterized by short time spans, unreliable records of landings, and lack of catch-perunit-effort (CPUE) data (Al-Abdulrazzak et al., 2015). Put another way, we don't know a great deal about measurable ecosystem productivity in many areas today, much less in the past. ...
... Artisanal fisheries are crucial in fulfilling the growing demand and per capita consumption of fish and Figures S1 and S2). Indeed, they significantly contribute to the total fishery capture production in the Gulf (Al-Abdulrazzak et al. 2015). The Gulf artisanal fisheries have high accessibility to much of the EEZ area (Table 1). ...
... Use of satellite technologies now provides near real-time AIS data, which some non governmental organisations (NGOs) are making partially available online in an aggregated format(McCauley et al., 2016). Global Fishing Watch is an example of such a system that uses an algorithm to detect fishing activities and provides a forum for data exchange(Al- Abdulrazzak & Pauly, 2014;Toonen & Bush, 2018). ...
... Arabian Gulf and Sea of Oman are among the important marine extensions of the Indian Ocean. By way of the Strait of Hormuz, the Arabian Gulf is connected to the Sea of Oman, which is bounded by Iran on its north coast and United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Sultanate of Oman on its south coast (Al-Abdulrazzak et al., 2015;Al-Abdulrazzak & Pauly, 2014;Hamza & Munawar, 2009;Sadighzadeh et al., 2014;Valinassab et al., 2006). ...
... These ideas were being discussed in the decades before the 20-teens (FAO, 2015) but in the 20-teens they have taken a central place in discussing sustainability of fishing. Correspondingly, fully 20% of the papers presenting new or adapted ideas of the social aspects of sustainable fishing deal directly with governance and or the use of alternative knowledge systems in sustainability of small-scale fisheries (Al-Humaidhi et al., 2013;Groeneveld, 2011;Maravelias et al., 2018;McClenachan et al., 2014;O. R. Young et al., 2018). ...