Cynthia Bosumtwi-Sam's research while affiliated with Ghana Education Service and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Objectives To examine the prevalence, determinants, and impact of local school health management committees on implementation of minimum‐recommended school health services delivery among basic and secondary schools in Ghana. Methods National level cross‐sectional data from the first‐ever assessment of Ghana Global‐School Health Policies and Practi...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Use of evidenced-based public health policy initiatives is a key goal for the World Health Organization (WHO) and member states such as Ghana. However, initiatives providing vital data for evidence-based public health policies are often plagued by sustainability issues. This presentation describes the coalition responsible for the suc...
Article
This article focuses on bullying among students and explores the ways it affects the attendance of senior high school students in Ghana. It explores whether having emotional problems, in addition to being bullied, incrementally affects the relationship between bullying and school attendance and the mitigating influence of peer friendships on these...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Poor hygiene and sanitation practices among school youth in Ghana lead to infectious diseases, diarrheal ailments and worm infestations. In 2004, the School Health Education Program (SHEP) unit partnered with local and international agencies to initiate the School Sanitation and Hygiene Education (SSHE) program in 4 of 10 regions. In...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Global surveillance efforts by UNAIDS and WHO estimate Ghana's rate of HIV infection to be between 1.9% to 2.6% for adults (UNAIDS, 2008). Until 2007 no comprehensive national level data were available to determine risk behaviors and knowledge of HIV infection for Ghana's youth. In 2007, the Ghana GSHS (Global School-Based Student Hea...

Citations

... The study areas, Bosomtwi and Atwima Kwanwoma districts, were zoned into three sections namely the Far East (Beposo and Abono), the Far West (Aburaso, Trabuom, Nweneso No.1 and Nweneso No.3) and Central (Esreso, Sawua and Jachie-Pramso) as shown in (Figure 1). Thirteen schools made up of ten Junior High Schools (JHS) and all the three public Senior High Schools (SHS) in the two Districts were chosen using the School Health Education Promotor's (SHEP) operational guidelines manuals which identify the distribution of public/private schools in the study areas from all the zones which had benefited from SHEP interventions between 5 to 10 years and were still benefitting from the time of this studies (Owusu et al., 2008;Owusu et al., 2009;Owusu and Bosumtwi-Sam, 2014) (Table 1). Based on gender and class within either the Junior High School or Senior High School, between forty and fifty students were randomly selected from each school ( Table 1). ...
... The study areas, Bosomtwi and Atwima Kwanwoma districts, were zoned into three sections namely the Far East (Beposo and Abono), the Far West (Aburaso, Trabuom, Nweneso No.1 and Nweneso No.3) and Central (Esreso, Sawua and Jachie-Pramso) as shown in (Figure 1). Thirteen schools made up of ten Junior High Schools (JHS) and all the three public Senior High Schools (SHS) in the two Districts were chosen using the School Health Education Promotor's (SHEP) operational guidelines manuals which identify the distribution of public/private schools in the study areas from all the zones which had benefited from SHEP interventions between 5 to 10 years and were still benefitting from the time of this studies (Owusu et al., 2008;Owusu et al., 2009;Owusu and Bosumtwi-Sam, 2014) (Table 1). Based on gender and class within either the Junior High School or Senior High School, between forty and fifty students were randomly selected from each school ( Table 1). ...
... The study areas, Bosomtwi and Atwima Kwanwoma districts, were zoned into three sections namely the Far East (Beposo and Abono), the Far West (Aburaso, Trabuom, Nweneso No.1 and Nweneso No.3) and Central (Esreso, Sawua and Jachie-Pramso) as shown in (Figure 1). Thirteen schools made up of ten Junior High Schools (JHS) and all the three public Senior High Schools (SHS) in the two Districts were chosen using the School Health Education Promotor's (SHEP) operational guidelines manuals which identify the distribution of public/private schools in the study areas from all the zones which had benefited from SHEP interventions between 5 to 10 years and were still benefitting from the time of this studies (Owusu et al., 2008;Owusu et al., 2009;Owusu and Bosumtwi-Sam, 2014) (Table 1). Based on gender and class within either the Junior High School or Senior High School, between forty and fifty students were randomly selected from each school ( Table 1). ...
... 20 Hence, school attendance may not be a significant factor to explain violence in rural Bangladesh as found in some other studies. [36][37][38] The home settings in rural Bangladesh often include multiple families and households living together in a single settlement, and adolescent violence may be more likely among peers who may not necessarily be family members but live in close proximity within these settlements. This may explain the high prevalence of violence in the home from our study. ...