Cressida J. Heyes's research while affiliated with University of Alberta and other places

Publications (8)

Article
Full-text available
This essay identifies two kinds of awareness of one’s body that occur in a variety of literatures: awareness as psychologically or spiritually enabling or therapeutic, and awareness as undesirable self-consciousness of the body. Drawing on Foucault’s account of normalizing judgment, it argues that these two forms of awareness are impossible to sepa...
Article
This article summarizes Ami Harbin’s 2016 monograph, Disorientation and Moral Life, which argues that disorientations are an invaluable ethical resource. Harbin offers what she calls a “non-resolvist account of moral agency,” in which non-deliberative and non-decisive action has the potential to be just as morally significant as fully thought-throu...
Article
This article examines the various possibilities for making an analogy or disanalogy between cosmetic and trans surgeries, focusing on the suggestion that trans surgeries are medically necessary while cosmetic surgeries are not—a position that has a great deal of rhetorical force. The authors argue that this disanalogy both fails to understand the c...
Article
A recent popular focus on sexual assault cases involving women who are unconscious—whether because drunk, drugged, anesthetized, in a coma, or asleep—has drawn attention to the role of social media in both exacerbating and gaining redress for the harms of rape while unconscious. This article intersectionally situates cultural anxiety about women’s...
Article
Queer phenomenology as an interpretive framework can advance health research by illuminating why primary health care providers (HCPs) must move beyond definitions of sexuality as a set of reified identity formations indexed to normative gender, gender of partner, and sexual and reproductive practices. Our interviews with queer women participants an...
Article
Our study of queer women patients and their primary health care providers (HCPs) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, reveals a gap between providers' theoretical knowledge of "cultural competency" and patients' experience. Drawing on Patricia Benner's Dreyfusian model of skill acquisition in nursing, we suggest that the dissonance between the anti-heteronorma...

Citations

... The implications of this new direction in Foucault's late work, are still debated among Foucauldian scholars. In political, feminist, and queer theory, numerous studies draw on his ethics of care and discussion of parrhēsia in the development of critical theory and notions on political resistance in contemporary society (Bech Dyrberg 2016;Dean 2009;Hardt 2010;Heyes 2018;Oksala 2016;Prozorov 2017). Such approaches still attend to the decentralized character of modern governmentality, and its "conduct of conduct". ...
... Trans studies scholars highlight how medicalization of trans people reproduces a troubling distinction between natural and unnatural forms of technological bodily mediation. They build on feminist critiques of biological reductionism of sex and gender (Fausto-Sterling 2000;Haraway 2016) to argue for ontologies of natural variation that highlight bodies in process and incorporate an assemblage of different technologies (Gill-Peterson 2014; Heyes and Latham 2018;Lane 2009;Preciado 2013). Yet, in third-party payer health care systems (US), the GID diagnosis appears to have legitimated the experiences of trans people and facilitated a set of medical interventions with insurance benefits (Drescher 2010, p. 428;Meyerowitz 2002;Plemons 2017). ...
... In some cases, they suffer no permanent or even detectable damage to their bodies, and they cannot recollect any hurtful memory of the event. The atrocious harm they suffer, then, cannot be accounted for by the consequences of the viola tion or its impact on the pursuing of some further goal; rather, it consists in the very fact of having lost control over their bodies, because their bodies have been invaded without their consent and authorization (Archard 2007;Heyes 2016). ...
... Organizations may manifest a gendered and heterosexualized configuration of space. Some articles (Baggio, 2017;Heyes, Dean, & Goldberg, 2016;Kelly et al., 2020;Lehtonen, 2016;Mattheis et al., 2019;Ndzwayiba & Steyn, 2019;Resnick & Galupo, 2019;Rich, Schutten, & Rogers, 2012;Schilt & Westbrook, 2009;Worst & O'Shea, 2020) mention restrooms, lockers, and toilets that are clearly distinguished for women and men in organizations as a reflection of a binary understanding of gender. Heterosexuality normalization also shows to be physically expressed using signs that only represent what is considered the norm. ...
... Non-biological parents may feel reluctant to clarify their role in the family for fear of being inappropriately deemed ineligible to make health decisions (McNair et al., 2008). Some studies have shown that many healthcare providers do not consider it important for same-sex parents to disclose their sexuality in a healthcare consultation as they feel it has no bearing on the quality of care they deliver (Chapman et al., 2012;Heyes and Thachuck, 2014). However, for parents who wish to disclose their sexuality, this attitude places the onus on them to raise the topic, rather than on providers to ensure people feel safe to do this. ...