Connie Mayer's research while affiliated with York University and other places

Publications (4)

Article
Thirty-three young people with cochlear implants, aged between 9 and 16 years, were assessed for use of their implant system, cognitive abilities, vocabulary, reading, and writing skills. The group came from throughout England and included 26 born deaf, six deafened by meningitis, one with auditory neuropathy, and five with additional needs. Ninete...
Article
Purpose: The Internet has been a growing source of health information on hearing loss, but the information provided often varies in quality, readability, and usability. Additionally, the information is provided across a wide range of domains, making access challenging to those who need it. This research forum article describes the development of a...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reviews the impact that cochlear implantation has had on the practice of deaf education in terms of educational placement, communication choices, and educational attainments. Although there is variation in outcome, more children with implants are going to mainstream schools, and using spoken language as their primary means of communicati...

Citations

... There are few studies of DHH students' use of adjectives, but those that exist demonstrate that the DHH students write fewer adjectives than their typically hearing peers, and that the vocabulary of this group is less varied (Asker-Árnason et al., 2012;Mayer, Watson, Archbold, Ng, & Mulla, 2016;Vizzi, Angelelli, Iaia, Risser, & Marinelli, 2022). ...
... Following a successful grant application, an expert web designer was engaged to create and develop a visually appealing and easy to navigate site (Maycock et al 2012). It was essential to ensure that the website was clear, easily understood, relevant and up to date (Ng, Archbold, Mayer and Mulla 2015). The website homepage contains an introductory video and instructions on how to navigate the site. ...
... The low performance of DHH children in PA may also be related to the problems caused by the hearing aids and cochlear implants they use in recognising and distinguishing sounds. Although hearing aids and cochlear implants provide access to sounds, this access is not the same as their typical hearing peers (Archbold & Mayer, 2012;Harkins & Bakke, 2011), which can make it more difficult for them to listen and recognise the sounds that make up a word, especially in noisy environments such as classrooms. This situation reflects negatively on their PA skills. ...