Clayton Thyne's research while affiliated with University of Kentucky and other places

Publications (4)

Article
Once considered artifacts of history, research on coups has burgeoned recently. Most studies focus on decisions to stage coups, considering factors like individual benefits, organizational interests, and government legitimacy. Less work considers what happens following coups. This article considers the political trajectory of states following coups...
Article
Signals from domestic and international actors have been shown to influence the likelihood of coups. Coups remain difficult to predict and consequently leave policy makers in a reactive stance, but little systematic work assesses how these reactions influence long-term outcomes. We examine how reactions from domestic and international actors influe...
Article
This paper considers how coups d’état influence the duration of civil wars. While previous work on civil war duration has ignored coups, grouped them alongside civil wars or considered them as a special type of conflict, this article recognizes coups as dramatic events that can quickly change the course of a conflict. Coups that take place during a...
Article
Child soldiers remain a stark reminder of the suffering caused by civil wars. This paper explores the long-term calculations that rebel leaders employ when deciding whether or not to use child soldiers. A norm against the use of child soldiers has been strongly stated by the international community. Given their need to attract international support...

Citations

... Thyne and co-authors provide an example. They attribute the stability of the Egypt-Israeli relationship following Egypt's 2013 coup to the immediate pledge by coup-leaders to maintain previous defense policies(Thyne et al. 2018). ...
... Not all conflicts identified by UCDP data are costly for the leaders and the military so I only include conflicts that reach 1000 battle deaths by consulting the Cumulative Intensity variable in the UCDP data. As recommended by Thyne (2017), civil wars in the UCDP data that are captured as coup events in the Powell and Thyne data (2011) are recoded to 0. They are recoded in order to distinguish coup events that have led to more than 25 fatalities from civil wars thus avoiding conflating the impact of war estimators and biasing the results. 14 One might argue that interstate and civil wars have different implications for civilmilitary relations and, therefore, they should be treated separately in the analysis. ...
... A third stream recently emerged as a response to the inability of the first two to explain variation in child soldier usage across warring parties active in the same period and the same country (or a common region; Andvig & Gates, 2010;Beber & Blattman, 2013). To explain such variation, recent studies focus more on the demand side (e.g., Beber & Blattman, 2013;Haer et al., 2020;Haer & Böhmelt, 2016a, 2016bLasley & Thyne, 2015). Scholars working in this strand of research investigate factors influencing the decision of recruiters to enlist children. ...