Claudia Zúñiga's research while affiliated with University of Santiago, Chile and other places

Publications (17)

Article
Anxiety associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and home confinement has been associated with adverse health behaviors, such as unhealthy eating, smoking, and drinking. However, most studies have been limited by regional sampling, which precludes the examination of behavioral consequences associated with the pandemic at a global level. Further, few s...
Article
Full-text available
The present paper examines longitudinally how subjective perceptions about COVID-19, one’s community, and the government predict adherence to public health measures to reduce the spread of the virus. Using an international survey ( N = 3040), we test how infection risk perception, trust in the governmental response and communications about COVID-19...
Article
Full-text available
Before vaccines for COVID-19 became available, a set of infection prevention behaviors constituted the primary means to mitigate the virus spread. Our study aimed to identify important predictors of this set of behaviors. Whereas social and health psychological theories suggest a limited set of predictors, machine learning analyses can identify cor...
Article
Full-text available
Anxiety associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and home confinement has been associated with adverse health behaviors, such as unhealthy eating, smoking, and drinking. However, most studies have been limited by regional sampling, which precludes the examination of behavioral consequences associated with the pandemic at a global level. Further, few s...
Article
Understanding the determinants of COVID-19 vaccine uptake is important to inform policy decisions and plan vaccination campaigns. The aims of this research were to: (1) explore the individual- and country-level determinants of intentions to be vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, and (2) examine worldwide variation in vaccination intentions. This cross-s...
Article
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Tightening social norms is thought to be adaptive for dealing with collective threat yet it may have negative consequences for increasing prejudice. The present research investigated the role of desire for cultural tightness, triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, in increasing negative attitudes towards immigrants. We used participant-level data from...
Article
During the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. conservative politicians and the media downplayed the risk of both contracting COVID-19 and the effectiveness of recommended health behaviors. Health behavior theories suggest perceived vulnerability to a health threat and perceived effectiveness of recommended health-protective behaviors dete...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines whether compliance with COVID-19 mitigation measures is motivated by wanting to save lives or save the economy (or both), and which implications this carries to fight the pandemic. National representative samples were collected from 24 countries (N = 25,435). The main predictors were (1) perceived risk to contract coronavirus, (...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Coronavirus is highly infectious and potentially deadly. In the absence of a cure or a vaccine, the infection prevention behaviors recommended by the World Health Organization constitute the only measure that is presently available to combat the pandemic. The unprecedented impact of this pandemic calls for swift identification of factors most i...
Preprint
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In this work, we study how social contacts and feelings of solidarity shape experiences of loneliness during the COVID-19 lockdown in early 2020. We draw on cross-national data, collected across four time points between mid-March until early May 2020. We situate our work within the public debate on these issues and discuss to what extent the public...
Preprint
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According to health behavior theories, perceived vulnerability to a health threat and perceived effectiveness of recommended health-protective behaviors determine motivation to follow these recommendations. Because the U.S. President Trump and U.S. conservative politicians downplayed the risk and seriousness of contracting COVID-19 and the effectiv...
Article
Full-text available
The PsyCorona collaboration is a research project to examine processes involved in the COVID-19 pandemic, such as behavior that curbs virus transmission, which may implicate social norms, cooperation, and self-regulation. The study also examines psychosocial consequences of physical distancing strategies and societal lockdown, such as frustration o...
Article
Full-text available
Mapping the Moods of COVID-19: Global Study Uses Data Visualization to Track Psychological Responses, Identify Targets for Intervention
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper examines whether compliance with COVID-19 mitigation measures is motivated by wanting to save lives or save the economy (or both), and which implications this carries to fight the pandemic. National representative samples were collected from 24 countries (N=25,435). The main predictors were (i) perceived risk to contract coronavirus, (ii...
Preprint
Full-text available
Previous studies suggested that public trust in government is vital for implementations of social policies that rely on public's behavioural responses. This study examined associations of trust in government regarding COVID-19 control with recommended health behaviours and prosocial behaviours. Data from an international survey with representative...

Citations

... A growing body of literature suggests that the initial waves of the pandemic impacted tobacco use patterns in varied ways [17]. For instance, some adults endorsed increased tobacco use due to greater stress/negative effect [18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25]. Conversely, others reported decreased use because of reduced ability to afford or access tobacco products [26,27], lower social opportunities where use typically occurred [28] and/or health concerns [20,[29][30][31][32]. ...
... The perceived benefits that affect individual health behavior are caused by an individual's belief that perceived threats can be reduced, or positive outcomes can result from health behavior; whereas perceived barriers can result from the belief in losses, negative consequences, and costs owing to the behavior [9]. A recent study showed that individuals' perception of COVID-19 affected their infection preventive behavior [10]. Thus, these selected constructs from the HBM can be used to analyze the demographic, socio-psychological, and structural variables that affect individuals' health behavior [11]. ...
... People may invest more into sending a social message since it matters for their moral self-image (Benabou & Tirole 2002, Falk & Szech 2020, Loewenstein 1999. Or they may want to comply with a social norm (Bicchieri 2005, Bicchieri & Dimant 2019, Kittel et al. 2021, Schumpe et al. 2022. ...
... Conspiratorial theories seem to play an important role in shaping the pandemic-related behaviors, especially less adherence to the restrictions (e.g. Freeman et al., 2020;Jolley & Douglas, 2014;Kowalski et al., 2020;Swami & Barron, 2021;Venea et al., 2022). ...
... Immigrants are more likely to experience COVID-19-related health disruptions because of crowded housing and large household size (Kjollesdal et al., 2022), difficulty with health literacy (Wang et al., 2020), concerns related to testing and treatment (e.g., requirements to present official identification or residency documentation) (Lechuga et al., 2022), language barriers (Caron & Adegboye, 2021), and inadequate insurance coverage (McFadden et al., 2022). Furthermore, a multi-country analysis has shown that the threat posed by COVID-19 has led to increased "othering" of immigrant communities and anti-immigrant sentiment (Mula et al., 2022). Taken together, citizenship status is a social determinant of health, and the "citizenship shield" functions as a protective factor with respect to accessing COVID-19-related health information, testing, care, vaccines, and financial support (Cadenas et al., 2022). ...
... Contrasting the development of penicillin with the development and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines, again, there was a compelling epidemiological need and a capacity for mass-producing different versions of the vaccine. What makes this configuration different from that surrounding the acceptance of penicillin is the extraordinary levels of politicization and polarization of the disease and its treatment from conservative politicians and the media [57]. The result of this polarization was a bifurcated level of acceptance, documented in state-by-state and county-by-county analyses over time, with more liberal and urban areas having much higher vaccination rates, and as a direct result, they had lower rates of onset, hospitalization, and mortality as compared to more conservative and more rural areas of the country. ...
... However, saving lives or saving the economy should not be considered as dueling goals. Instead, strategies like public messaging in adjusting the COVID-19 control measures are suggested to mitigate health and economic losses [58]. ...
... The PsyCorona study was launched in March 2020 to examine virus and lockdown-related behavior, cognition, emotion, and motivation (Agostini et al., 2022;Leander, 2020). The research was approved by the Ethics Committees of the University of Groningen (PSY1920-S-0390) and New York University Abu Dhabi (HRPP-2020-42). ...
... However, lonely people may be less likely to seek out contactonline or in person (Lim et al., 2016;van Breen et al., 2020). Furthermore, there is mixed evidence as to whether online behaviour is caused by, or causes loneliness (Boursier et al., 2020;Çikrıkci, 2016;Lim et al., 2020;Morahan-Martin & Schumacher, 2003;Song et al., 2014). ...
... Certainly, preliminary research indicates that trust in the government is essential in promoting the perception among the public that the government can control the COVID-19 pandemic. Han et al. (2020) sampled residents of 23 nations and consistently found that governments that were perceived as being fair, well organized, and disseminating clear and understandable information about COVID-19 were consequently perceived as being more trustworthy. Where individuals hold higher levels of trust in their governments, they appear to be more likely to adopt health-protective behaviors and adhere to the imposed government measures (Han et al., 2020;Vally, 2020). ...