Claire Sams's research while affiliated with Milton Keynes College and other places

Publications (7)

Article
It is often claimed that working and talking with partners while carrying out maths activities is beneficial to students’ learning and the development of their mathematical understanding. However, observational research has shown that primary school children often do not work productively in group-based classroom activities, with the implication th...
Article
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In this paper, we describe an innovative approach to promoting effective classroom-based groupwork and the development of children's speaking and listening at Key Stage 1. This approach, known as Thinking Together, was initially developed for use with Key Stage 2 children. The work reported here explains how this approach has now been applied to th...
Article
Full-text available
Sociocultural researchers have claimed that students' learning of science is a discursive process, with scientific concepts and ways of reasoning being learned through engagement in practical enquiry and social interaction as well as individualized activity. It is also often claimed that interacting with partners while carrying out scientific inves...
Article
This article describes the outcomes of recent research on children's talk while engaged in joint literacy activities in primary school (Year 5). The research is based on a conception of talk as a tool for ‘thinking together’, with computer software being treated as a resource for organising and focusing children's involvement in collaborative activ...
Article
At the heart of these 12 lesson plans is the 'talk box'. Teachers take what is in the box and by following the book's guidelines, can structure children's talk so that they share information, articulate ideas, reason and negotiate. Lessons cover: Whole class and small group work that is built around specific learning bjectives and the NLS; Cross-cu...

Citations

... Several studies have highlighted how children first learn to argue with others through interactions with their parents (Hay and Ross 1982;Stein and Albro 2001;Tesla and Dunn 1992) and other siblings (Eisenberg 1992;Perlmann and Ross 1997;Ross et al. 2006). Later, when children enter school, they are offered many opportunities to engage in argumentative discussions and learn how to resolve disputes with their peers (Orsolini 1993;Mercer and Sams 2006). ...
... The theme of taking into account the views of others appears across several studies (Charitonos,2015;Davidsen & Vanderlinde,2016;Pifarré & Staarman, 2011). Many studies note how digital technologies can enhance productive classroom dialogue via the externalization of ideas that can be visualized on a screen (Mercer et al., 2003). The easy manipulation of technology facilitates learners' collaborative talk since it provides learners with additional channels to talk, for example the instant messaging option. ...
... Ma¨a¨tta¨and Ja¨rvela¨ (2013) found from their participatory project that 'young children expressed greater confidence in learning situations when they were involved in child-teacher-task interactions' (Dawes and Sams 2004;Usher 2008). Involving children and adolescents in their learning assists them in determining their needs and increases their confidence to help ensure that they are able to live the lives they want (p. ...
... Moreover, during the negotiation process, students can develop their thinking disposition, skills and knowledge collaboratively. Mercer et al. (2004) investigated British primary students studying in groups during scientific inquiry activities and found that communication during cooperative group work scaffolds the development of students' reasoning skills. However, the results of this study revealed that the effects of multiple perspectives and student negotiation might not be as significant as previously thought. ...
... Moreover, there is a solid body of empirical evidence underpinning the contribution of student talk to problem solving and collaboration in cooperative groups. Studies spanning many years have highlighted the value of Exploratory talk in particular-that is, talk where "ideas are explicitly debated, requests for challenges are made, and alternative suggestions are offered" (Littleton et al., 2005, p. 5), for developing important cognitive and communicative capacities transferable beyond the immediate task (e.g., Dawes, 2004;Littleton et al., 2005). Littleton et al.'s intervention where young children (5-7 year olds) completed a series of 'Talk box' lessons designed to teach collaborative talk skills for working in cooperative groups, identified that children generated and implemented 'ground rules' for group talk, which fostered learning environments that were inclusive, positive and supportive. ...