Christopher Redding's research while affiliated with University of Florida and other places

Publications (32)

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We used five waves of nationally representative data over 16 years from the Schools and Staffing Survey, National Teacher Principal Survey, and Teacher Follow-up Survey to descriptively examine how the roles, responsibilities, preparation, and supports for special educators have changed over time. We then used regression to investigate how these va...
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In this study, we investigated retention intention and job satisfaction of 238 first-year alternatively certified (AC) teachers. Drawing on Organizational Socialization Theory, we tested the hypothesis that AC teacher extraversion and perceived school support are positively related to the two variables and mediated by self-efficacy. To test our hyp...
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Using unique statewide panel data from Tennessee, we describe instructional coach (IC) and teacher peer observer (TPO) distributions in terms of their teaching expertise and observable school and district characteristics. The evidence suggests ICs are more likely to work in districts with lower-performing teachers while working in schools with high...
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This latent class analysis study used a bias-adjusted three-step approach to empirically identify mutually exclusive clusters of teacher professional qualifications based on commonly studied indicators of teacher quality. We then examined the relationship between cluster membership and the mathematics gains of adolescents at risk for mathematics di...
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Teachers’ preference to remain close to where they grew up is recognized as a defining feature of the teacher labor market. Using a unique data set from a large school district in the southeastern United States, I apply a series of within–school and within–student comparisons to assess the effectiveness of homegrown teachers who returned to teach i...
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This study uses data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, 2010–2011 to better understand the rates of grade retention during elementary school and the factors associated with this grade retention. Using matched student–teacher and student–principal data, I examine the student-, teacher-, and school-level factors associated with a student’s...
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Scholars have documented long-standing disparities in access to well-qualified, well-supported teachers, including disparities in access to special education teachers (SETs), based on student socioeconomic status. In response, policy initiatives have aimed to incentivize teaching in higher-poverty schools. Thus, we examined changes over time in dis...
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Drawing on nationally representative data from the 1988 to 2018 school years, the authors provide an overview of some of the key changes in the characteristics of first-year teachers in the U.S., including racial/ethnic identity, education levels, subject area, and certification status. The data also show that new teachers have become increasingly...
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Growing concerns about inequitable access have made public investment in gifted programs controversial in many school districts, yet advocates maintain that gifted services provide necessary enrichment for exceptional students to succeed at school. We provide evidence on whether the typical gifted program indeed benefits elementary students’ achiev...
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The Teacher of the Year (TOY) program is the longest-standing teacher recognition program in the United States. The purpose of this study is to describe the characteristics of state and national TOY awardees and the schools in which they teach. To accomplish this aim, we develop a new data set including the characteristics of all TOY awardees and t...
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Drawing on nationally representative data from six cohorts of beginning teachers from the Schools and Staffing Survey and the National Teacher and Principal Survey, this study applies a difference-in-differences research design to examine the relationship between changes to state-level alternative certification policies and the characteristics of n...
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Background Over the past couple of decades, new teachers have become a pronounced focus of policy makers. This attention is a result of demographic shifts in the teacher labor market, increased attention to the quality of teachers assigned to historically underserved student populations, and high rates of new teacher turnover. Purpose Our goal is...
Article
School turnaround has emerged as a predominant strategy to improve chronically low-performing schools, although the approach remains controversial. This meta-analysis synthesizes results from 35 studies to examine the relationship between school turnaround and various student outcomes. We find that school turnaround is associated with improved atte...
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School improvement plans (SIPs) are increasingly used to structure the process of setting and monitoring goals. As SIPs are designed to identify and address local problems of practice, there is the possibility that these tools help school leaders initiate and carry out ambitious school improvement. Yet, practical challenges abound in the developmen...
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Background Alternatively certified (AC) teachers have generally been found to turn over at higher rates than traditionally certified (TC) teachers. These higher turnover rates are generally attributed to lower levels of preparedness and less of a commitment to remain in teaching than TC teachers, both of which may be compounded by AC teachers’ incr...
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At all levels of education, the racial achievement gap in performance between Black and Latino students and their White peers stubbornly persists. While the causes of this gap are numerous and interrelated, one theory posits that students from underrepresented racial groups may face stereotype threat, meaning that fear of failing and thereby fulfil...
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In this essay, Jason A. Grissom, Christopher Redding, and Joshua F. Bleiberg investigate the receipt of gifted services based on the socioeconomic status (SES) of elementary school students and their families. Using nationally representative longitudinal data, they show that gaps in the receipt of gifted services between the highest and lowest SES...
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This article is situated at the intersection of two trends in education research: a growing emphasis on the importance of co-cognitive traits and the emergence of research-practice partnerships to more effectively scale effective practices. Our partnership focused on building student ownership and responsibility for their learning, which means crea...
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Purpose Administrator support has been identified as a key factor in deterring teacher turnover. Yet, the specific ways school principals directly or indirectly influence teacher retention remain underexamined. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach This study includes a survival analysis to examine when beginning mathem...
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Considerable research has examined the positive educational experiences of students of color assigned to teachers of the same race or ethnicity. Underlying this research is the belief that the cultural fit between students and teachers has the potential to improve a child’s academic and nonacademic performance in school. This comprehensive review e...
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The growing evidence on the importance of teacher representation points to the need to better understand the factors shaping the lack of racial/ethnic diversity in the teacher workforce. In this study, we examine the extent to which college major choice explains racial/ethnic gaps in teaching. Drawing on data from the Baccalaureate and Beyond Longi...
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Teacher turnover occurs during and at the end of the school year, although documentation of within-year turnover currently rests on anecdotal evidence. On average, over 4.6% of teachers turn over during the school year, which amounts to 25% of total annual turnover. Teachers transfer within districts at higher rates at the beginning of the school y...
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Background Research suggests a number of benefits from teacher participation in school improvement—chief among them that it can increase teacher receptivity to innovation and reform adoption. Improvement science has been put forward as a new paradigm for involving local school stakeholders in the improvement process. Purpose We describe the belief...
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Using unique administrative data from North Carolina that allow us to separate classroom teacher turnover during the school year from end-of-year turnover, we find students who lose their teacher during the school year have significantly lower test score gains (on average −7.5 percent of a standard deviation unit) than those students whose teachers...
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Most prior research measures teacher turnover as an annual event, but teachers actually leave their positions throughout the school year. We use data from North Carolina to measure teacher turnover monthly throughout the entire year and conduct an analysis of their persistence to examine the differences in early career teacher turnover. Annually, 6...
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Qualified science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) teachers are critical in the provision of high-quality STEM education for all students. Through descriptive and regression analysis, we document how demographic characteristics, qualifications, and turnover rates of a nationally representative sample of public school STEM teachers h...
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This paper presents evidence from a unique reform model that allowed teachers and other educators in a large urban district to collaborate with one another in the development of an innovation meant to improve student ownership and responsibility. In this longitudinal case study, we describe school stakeholders’ learning about the design, the proces...
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The conventional approach to scaling up educational reforms considers the development and testing phases to be distinct from the work of implementing at scale. Decades of research suggest that this approach yields inconsistent and often disappointing improvements for schools most in need. More recent scholarship on scaling school improvement sugges...
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Alternative certification programs are now commonplace in the credentialing of new teachers. We complement the growing evidence base for these teachers by exploring their turnover patterns in four waves of the nationally representative Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). We report on descriptive evidence of growing differences in the characteristic...
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Scholars have suggested that the benefits of representative bureaucracy arise from bureaucrats acting in the interests of clients who share their characteristics, increased diversity encouraging even nonminority bureaucrats work to further the interests of minority clients, and/or the actions of clients that are more responsive to bureaucrats that...
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Students of color are underrepresented in gifted programs relative to White students, but the reasons for this underrepresentation are poorly understood. We investigate the predictors of gifted assignment using nationally representative, longitudinal data on elementary students. We document that even among students with high standardized test score...

Citations

... Despite the fact that instructors were in charge of implementing digital learning materials and experimenting with new technologies, there was a research gap about the best ways for teachers to learn to work with digital tools (Puttick et al., 2015). Without practitioner buy-in and advocacy for technology integration as a personal and professional commitment to actively engage in a process, task, or effort, no change in the delivery of instruction would occur (French-Bravo & Crow, 2015;Redding & Viano, 2018). ...
... At the other end, beginning teachers may assess that the profession (or their school) is not a good fit and choose to leave (Cochran-Smith et al., 2012). Previous studies have found that annual turnover rates are highest in the first year or two (Hanushek et al., 2004;Redding & Henry, 2019) and, when looking at new teachers longitudinally, high initial leaving or moving rates decrease over time as teachers gain more experience (e.g., Kelly & Northrop, 2015;Redding & Smith, 2019). ...
... Nothing could be further from the truth. Due to the current and longstanding inequity in the populations of students identified as gifted and talented (something I have written on in Peters and Carter (2021) and , and also highlighted in 2022 by Young and Young (2022)), and the fact that this inequity appears to co-occur with little in terms of educational benefits for the students who do end up being served by gifted programs (Adelson et al., 2012;Card & Giuliano, 2016;Redding & Grissom, 2021), I would end the designation of students as gifted tomorrow. Although there are exceptions that should see far-greater use in K-12 schools (e.g., grade acceleration), too many gifted programs are both ineffective and inequitable. ...
... States and districts should consider partnering with teacher preparation programs to create grow-your-own special education certification programs that specifically target individuals who have already demonstrated commitment to working with SWD (Zhang et al., 2014). Such programs also have the added benefit of increasing the number of teachers of color who enter the profession (e.g., Gist et al., 2019;Redding, 2021;Scott, 2019). ...
... While other studies focused on AC teachers at the beginning of their careers, the present study examined AC teachers with different levels of teaching experience. Since the turnover rate is highest among beginning teachers (Redding & Nguyen, 2020) and even higher for AC teachers (Redding & Henry, 2019), it must be noted that the present study looked mainly at teachers who "survived" their first years of teaching and did not leave the profession. This aspect could possibly explain the results found in this study and must be kept in mind when interpreting them. ...
... Peters (2021) highlights a variety of systemic reasons traditional gifted identification processes may fail to equitably identify traditionally underrepresented students; however, at the core of Peter's argument is a defense of the gifted and talented label. Common criticisms of gifted education include that it promotes fixed labels attached to opaque instructional practices or services that provide greater advantages to a privileged few (Grissom et al., 2019). The gifted label also attracts stereotypes and misconceptions relative to student behaviors and services. ...
... Second, the relationship between teacher personal characteristics and their job satisfaction and stress might vary according to countries and types of teaching subjects [33]. This study examined US mathematics teachers, who showed high turnover rates compared to other countries [63,64]. Ingersoll et al. [63] estimated that the turnover rate of the US mathematics teachers due to a high level of stress and low level of job satisfaction every year is 15%. ...
... Research Practice Partnerships (RPPs) have been increasingly used in K-12 education to address general problems of practice through a unique collaboration that includes various stakeholders (i.e., researchers and practitioners) committed to designing and implementing solutions. Recent examples of the types of problems that RPPs seek to address include reducing student disciplinary infractions and number of failed courses, improve student grades and attendance (Cannata et al., 2019), obtaining evidence that could inform policy and help students make decisions about their future educational and career paths (Wentworth et al., 2017), and examining and addresses issues of inequity and access to equalize status and increase student engagement (Wentworth et al., 2017). ...
... Relatedly, recent scholarship has also discussed the social backgrounds of academics and how discussions of their own trajectories can potentially inspire students, especially those who may share similar experiences or identities (e.g. Mishra, 2020;Redding, 2019). ...