Christoph Rüther's research while affiliated with University of Münster and other places

Publications (4)

Conference Paper
Semantic interoperability in GIS is the ability to share geospatial information at the application level. This paper argues that we currently have a relatively clear understanding of what semantic heterogeneity means, what are real world cases that exemplify this heterogeneity, and who to characterize these differences. We believe that the stage is...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract This work is embedded in a project to support traffic planning with heterogeneous data. We will describe how we develop a common,ontology of two existing databases which are used in this project. The two databases are ATKIS (Amtliches Topographisches Informationssystem) and GDF (Geographic Data Files)[1, 2]. For information sharing the inv...

Citations

... Agarwal [5] has discussed that a unified approach to ontology specification in the geospatial domain does not exist. Different approaches including the approaches of formal ontologies [8] and algebraic approaches [9] [10] have evolved in parallel to the conventional approaches of Description Logic (DL) based specifications. Geospatial ontology engineering has been also proposed to enable a supportive environment for knowledge representation in the geospatial domain[11] . ...
... Haskell can be seen as an ontology development and testing environment with unique advantages: it is typed, algebraic, higher-order, executable, lean, and freely available. A discussion of these and other advantages of functional languages for formal software specifications can be found in (Frank and Kuhn, 1999; Gerding et al., 2000). A typical problem with tools for ontology design is the precise definition of what it means to be a sub-concept of another concept. ...
... Instead, interoperability is managed in an ad hoc manor: (i) specification compliance tests (of protocols and APIs), e.g. plug tests for MQTT (MQ Telemetry Transport) implementations, 1 (ii) published API documentation for developers to follow (e.g. the Hyper/Cat [14] catalogue of IoT services) and (iii) development of mappings and adapters to broker system differences on a case-by-case basis (e.g., mappings between data [4] and mappings between middleware [20]). These solutions help, but there remains a significant burden on developers to understand and identify interoperability problems and then implement and test solutions accordingly. ...