Christine Keiner's research while affiliated with Rochester Institute of Technology and other places

Publications (4)

Article
Full-text available
As the Panama Canal approached its fiftieth anniversary in the mid-1960s, U.S. officials concerned about the costs of modernization welcomed the technology of peaceful nuclear excavation to create a new waterway at sea level. Biologists seeking a share of the funds slated for radiological-safety studies called attention to another potential effect...
Article
Full-text available
The year 2014 marked the centennial of the opening of the Panama Canal. Its construction is often narrated as a tale of triumph in which the US government conquered tropical nature using modern science and technology: dominating diseased landscapes, unpredictable rivers, and even physical geography itself. In this Forum, we combine environmental hi...
Conference Paper
From the early 1960s through the 1970s, the U.S. government spent considerable capital investigating the feasibility of replacing the Panama Canal with a non-lock waterway, a plan originally spurred by the economic promise of nuclear engineering. The proposal generated a storm of protest among scientists who faulted officials for downplaying its ri...
Article
Over the past decade, marine environmental historians have begun to mobilize the major themes of "traditional" environmental history-wilderness and the frontier-to provide insight into our neglected oceans, and the changing nature-culture interactions therein. Yet while practitioners of environmental history, with its powerful focus on landscapes o...

Citations

... The 2015 Centennial of the Panama Canal generated interest in how the first inter-American canal was completed (e.g., Carse, 2014;Keiner, 2017), and especially in the completion of the current canal expansion project (Rivera & Sheffi, 2013). The creation of Lake Gatun in 1913 by damming the Chagres River and Lake Alajuela (Madden) in 1934 by damming the Madden River led to the need to manage the region's tropical rainforests and reservoirs to sustain the water supplies for the Panama Canal (Carse, 2014(Carse, , 2016Heckadon-Moreno, 1993;Zaret, 1984). ...
... Lawrence Seaway on the fisheries of the Great Lakes, while Dorsey (1998) has studied fishing treaties between the United States and Canada. On the impact of the Panama Canal on regional ecology, disease patterns and regional communities, see Carse et al. (2016). Canals shifted patterns of energy usage that in ways that negatively impacted the environment (Jones 2010;Pritchard 2011;Worster 1985;White 1995). ...
... In addition, local participation in the gathering of and reflection upon this information can also contribute to greater awareness of climate and biodiversity change in local historical processes, and generate source material for environmental history (Weines 2016). Keiner (2013) and Taylor (2013) reflect on the future lack of source material about ecological changes and methodological challenges in extracting LEK from old sources. They conclude that a focus on preservation of LEK in the present can be an appropriate response. ...
... Also in 1971, a National Security Council committee cited invasive species as one of the reasons for abandoning the Plowshare plan for a sea-level canal, and this same decision persisted again in 1978. As Christine Keiner (2014) notes, "the fact that biologists had forced officials at the highest levels to acknowledge a novel ecological concern signified a new phase of the environmental management state." The history of the Panama Canal provides a basis of learning from past accomplishments and mistakes (Carse 2012(Carse , 2014. ...