Christine Dallaire's research while affiliated with University of Ottawa and other places

Publications (21)

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The Korean government established the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) in April 1991 as an agency of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) to design and execute most of its official development assistance (ODA) grants. Since then, KOICA has administered two forms of Korean sport grants: sport aid projects (e.g. the construction of sp...
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In April 1991, South Korea began its full-fledged participation in international development with the establishment of the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA). Since then, KOICA has implemented a variety of overseas sport volunteer programmes, Taekwondo-specific programmes and sport aid projects in the Global South. Our analysis aims to...
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Female officials are side-lined within the soccer community through gendered relations of power, even in Canada, where women remain outnumbered as referees and in other leadership positions despite remarkable growth in the women’s game since the 1980s and its heightened respect and standing. Drawing upon Foucault’s concepts of discourse and subject...
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On investigating the gendered experiences of Western Canadian ‘ladies barrel racing’ rodeo competitors, the sportswomen we interviewed emphasized their unique bond with the horse as the distinguishing feature that made them ‘legitimate’ barrel racers compared to other rodeo cowgirls, and ‘feminine’ compared to cowboys. This paper further explores h...
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Rodeo’s historical links to rural settler communities, ranching and cow herding traditions permeate the embodiment of the ‘legitimate’ barrel racing sportswoman in Western Canada. Ladies’ barrel racing is the only competition exclusive to women within Western Canada’s professional rodeos. Barrel racers’ gender performances are thus on display withi...
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The use of sport to promote social development and economic growth has been studied by Korean scholars focusing on the domestic effects of mega sport events or of ‘sport for all’ initiatives. Meanwhile, the concept of ‘sport for development’ (SFD) in English-language sport studies literature nowadays tends to focus on the use of sport as a strategy...
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On the 50th anniversary of the ISSA and IRSS, a leading Canadian scholar on sport, identities, and community, Christine Dallaire, considers the dynamic role of sport in reproducing national and ethnocultural communities in Canada. A diverse research agenda grew, merging considerations of not only the trajectory of Canada as a nation, but the meshin...
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Multidisciplinary research has contributed to a better understanding of the personal and societal correlates of risk perception. However, representations of ‘health risk’ remain to be characterised more fully. Drawing on a Canadian study conducted in 2004, an analysis was conducted to develop better characterisations of individual representations o...
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The Skirtboarders, a Montreal-based crew of female skateboarders, purposely challenge discourses of femininity through an Internet skateboarding blog. Interviews with crew members reveal the similarity between their sporting and Internet practices and processes that Foucault (1986, p. 28) referred to as "self-formation as an 'ethical subject'". We...
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By creating and posting their own stories on the Internet, sportswomen are able to challenge the persistent, sexist, mainstream and alternative (skateboarding) media (re)presentations of female athletes. A Foucauldian discourse analysis of 262 posts of the Skirtboarders’ blog – a Montreal-based, Canadian female skateboarding crew’s Internet project...
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This article reconsiders the Skirtboarders’ blog, produced by a crew of female skateboarders, as a space where crew members attempt to reflexively start a movement and, in doing so, construct and circulate a wider collective identity (Taylor & Whittier, 1992). Through a discourse analysis of blog comments and user interviews, we attempt to understa...
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In Canada, as in other neo-liberal states, a physically active lifestyle is discursively constructed as a moral activity, whereas a sedentary lifestyle is criticized as a failure to take charge of one's health (Bercovitz, 2000; Lupton, 1997). This study aims to understand how Canadian men and women articulate the discursive connections between phys...
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Dans la societe occidentale, les constructions discursives dominantes definissent les « gros » corps comme des corps malades qui manquent de volonte pour gerer leurs desirs. Ces discours neoliberaux laissent aussi entendre que le corps serait un objet mesurable distinct du corps vecu. Les femmes « grosses » sont assujetties aux discours neoliberaux...
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The objective of the present study was to explore different aspects of individual response to terrorism in Canada and develop a descriptive model of the processes involved. A qualitative analysis was performed on transcripts of individual and group interviews held across Canada (N = 73) wherein concerns and decisions surrounding terrorism were disc...
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This study examined the coverage of women's and men's varsity sport teams in the English- and French-language student newspapers at the University of Ottawa, Canada, during three academic years from 2004 to 2007. The analysis revealed unique findings, considering that previous research on campus print media had shown an enduring disparity of covera...
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Full-text available
The focus of this article is a descriptive account of the perceptions of five health hazards (motor vehicles, climate change, recreational physical activity, cellular phones, and terrorism) and five health outcomes (cancer, long-term disabilities, asthma, heart disease, and depression) from a recent survey of 1503 Canadians. In an attempt to shed l...
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A national survey of health risk perception among 1,503 adult Canadians was conducted in 2004 as a follow-up to a previous survey in 1992. Respondents were asked to indicate their personal opinion regarding a range of risk perception belief statements reflecting environmental concern, social concern, genetic concern, dependence on regulators, locus...
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Full-text available
A national survey of health risk perception among 1,503 Canadians was conducted in 2004. The current survey follows-up a previous national survey conducted in 1992 and documents changes in risk perception since that time and investigates new risk issues not previously examined. This article presents a description of the ratings of perceived risk of...

Citations

... Additionally, not only physiological differences should be taken into account, but also the lack of opportunities and the stereotyping constructed by soccer players, coaches and stakeholders from soccer should be valued to fight against this discrimination 29 . Moreover, in a recent study that reflect about what is a good referee in the perspective of a female soccer referee, revealed that being good referee was antagonistic to being feminine 30 . This is another cultural issue which must be set aside. ...
... Both the finding of this research and the finding of the work of Bathla and Yadav (2017) reveal that hockey referees use different methods to cope with sources of stress. Reid and Dallaire (2019) state that women are underrepresented in leadership positions within the historically patriarchal sports institution and face various challenges as coaches, referees or managers. The finding of the referees who participated in the study in favor of women in terms of gender distribution and stress sources is an indication that women are more stressed and it supports this discourse in a way. ...
... Using the classification from previous research, we categorized each sport in which CMPCs specialized as masculine, feminine, or gender-neutral (see Table 2). Specifically, we classified the sport specialization according to Sobal and Miligrim (2019) who studied the gender-typing of sports in the U.S. For sports that did not appear in Sobal and Miligrim (2019), we categorized them based on other studies focused on gender issues in a particular sport (Carr, 2017;Kidder, 2013;Knapp, 2015;Weninger & Dallaire, 2019): (a) parkour, rodeo, skateboarding, and Xtreme sports as masculine; (b) ice dancing and speed skating as feminine; ...
... L'analyse du processus de production Skirtboarders.com illustre comment les membres du crew accomplissent effectivement les processus de Foucault (1984a) sur la formation de soi en tant que « sujet moral » en propageant en ligne des discours non conventionnels de genre. Comme Hardin (2011) l'affirme, les créatrices de textes Internet ne produisent pas toujours des présentations qui se limitent uniquement à des fragments discursifs dominants de la féminité -certaines circulent des fragments discursifs inversés (Foucault, 1976(Foucault, , 1982 et utilisent les nouvelles plateformes médiatiques comme moyen de produire ces féminités non conventionnelles (MacKay et Dallaire, 2010). ...
... Various practices are identified in the literature by which women comply with normative gender regimes in sport. Those relevant to this study include: the process of emphasising feminine markers (Adams, Schmitke, & Franklin, 2005;Grogan, Evans, Wright, & Hunter, 2004;Sisjord & Kristiansen, 2009); distancing and othering (Adjepong, 2017;Ezzell, 2009;Laurendeau & Sharara, 2008;Nash, 2017;Sisjord, 2009;Weninger & Dallaire, 2017) and the acceptance of the patriarchal systems which oppress them (Ezzell, 2009;Laurendeau & Sharara, 2008;Sisjord, 2009). Several studies, for example, point to the way female athletes have sought to negotiate the conflicting 'athlete' (masculine) and 'female' identities required to be an elite sportsperson by counteracting masculine identities through accentuating their own feminine markers (Adams et al., 2005;Grogan et al., 2004;Sisjord & Kristiansen, 2009). ...
... Scholars have therefore criticised active living policies for 'creating a problem of sedentarianism' (Bercovitz, 2000, p. 24). That is, by placing physical activity and sedentary behaviours in opposition, they become moralised, with physical activity viewed as positive and sedentary behaviour as negative (Dallaire et al., 2012). The positioning of sedentary behaviour as a public health concern with detrimental effects on health, which some authors have compared to the detrimental effects of smoking, further pathologises sitting (Tulle, 2015). ...
... Throughout these vignettes we foreground the importance of the Foucauldian concept of "problematization" as a critical tool to enable individuals to distance themselves from taken-for-granted and normalized social and sporting practices and to critically evaluate the (un)intended consequences of these practices and the constitution of problematic subjectivities (i.e., modes of being a subject) within and through specific relations of powerknowledge. For example, problematizing the disciplinary legacy of high-performance sport (MacKay and Dallaire, 2013;Crocket, 2014Crocket, , 2015Denison et al., 2017;Gerdin et al., 2019), the narrow and cyclical relationship between sport science knowledge and discipline Konoval et al., 2019), and the production of docile bodies through taken-for-granted, normalized, and sanctioned "best" scientific coaching practices (Denison and Avner, 2011;Denison et al., 2017). In so doing, other forms of embodiments and relations to the self and others, the body and movement are made possible. ...
... In health campaigns, there is a visual rhetoric of risk (Kuperavage, 2017) that appears in the messaging, which conveys cultural and political meanings. The issue of disease is striking because it implicates not just the individual but also state agencies, surveillance, and the potential for social control (Lee et al., 2012). ...
... 1374). Skateboarding blogs have offered alternatives to other online representations, where participants embraced more fluid definitions of sporting femininities, rejected male/ female binaries and challenged maledominated institutions (MacKay & Dallaire, 2012, 2013. ...
... The GDS's mission was to put female sport at the centre of the media conversation -highlighting their achievements unadulterated by the key criticism directed at sports media of 'trivialisation and sexualisation' of female sports athletes (Trolan 2013). The project sought to re-dress some of the balance around the under-representation of women's sport by the mainstream media, not least in Scotland but also crucially actively informing the journalism education context (Mackay and Dallaire 2009). Consequently, there was positive bias generated by having female sports journalism graduates 'front' (lead and present) the shows as even when there has been a perceptible rise in women's sport by the wider mainstream broadcast media, men are often the lead chair with women as the co-host. ...