Christina Riggs's research while affiliated with University of East Anglia and other places

Publications (7)

Article
From the late nineteenth century, photography was inseparable from archaeological fieldwork, and object photography in particular was crucial to the creation and circulation of the archaeological artefact. Which objects were selected for photography, how they were photographed, and what then happened to both object and photograph: these interrelate...
Article
Full-text available
Linking the archive in its literal sense to the metaphorical repercussions of ‘the archive’ in a conceptual sense opens new lines of inquiry into the processes employed in museums to catalogue and store their objects. Archaeology—which was influential in Freud’s theories of memory and Derrida’s ‘Freudian impression’, Archive Fever—invites particula...
Article
Photographing archaeological labor was routine on Egyptian and other Middle Eastern sites during the colonial period and interwar years. Yet why and how such photographs were taken is rarely discussed in literature concerned with the history of archaeology, which tends to take photography as given if it considers it at all. This paper uses photogra...
Article
Full-text available
A single glass plate negative formerly in the collection of Howard Carter (most famously the excavator of Tutankhamun’s tomb) and now in the archives of the Griffith Institute, Oxford University raises a number of questions about photography, archaeological practice, and the creation and use of excavation archives. By following this negative, known...
Article
This article uses Egyptian burials of the Roman period as an entry point for considering aesthetics in relation to archaeology, ancient art, and human remains. Although some archaeologists and Egyptologists reject or ignore the concept of aesthetics, this article argues that it complements questions of ontology, materiality, and social practice tha...
Article
In 1821 Augustus Bozzi Granville FRS unwrapped and dissected an ancient Egyptian mummy, presenting the results of his examination to the Royal Society in 1825. He commissioned artist Henry Perry to draw the process in stages; these drawings were subsequently engraved by James Basire for publication in Philosophical Transactions. This article presen...

Citations

... Antiquity in the Archive is a collaborative project between Macquarie University and the Griffith Institute, University of Oxford, to digitise, catalogue, index and contextualise the archival records produced by the Egypt Exploration Fund's (EEF) late-19th century archaeological survey of the ancient cemetery of Beni Hassan in Egypt. The first part of this paper introduces the project's broader aims and aligns it with the growing call for researchers to engage with the materiality of archival holdings, and to consider archival documents as historical artefacts with complex conditions of production, and for archives to consider their role as instruments of colonial and institutional power (e.g., in Egyptology: Riggs 2017). An important outcome of this project will be to produce a free bi-lingual (English and Arabic) public-facing resource, which will make these archival documents digitally accessible to an international audience and publicise the archive's cultural legacy. ...
... Egyptology has been robustly critiqued in the past few years for ignoring the "nested" colonialisms-Ottoman, French, and British (El-Shakry 2007, 3)that shaped and enabled its development. Christina bli nd spots in museum an thro pology Riggs, for example, has done much to expose the "imperial amnesia" (Fletcher 2012) that characterizes the majority of representations of ancient Egypt, its collection and significance (Riggs 2014). Community consultations and audience research on galleries focused on ancient Egypt, meanwhile, have highlighted a second problematic consequence of contemporary displays: largely negative and dismissive views of modern Egypt amongst Western museum visitors in contrast to the reverence for its ancient (almost exclusively pharaonic) past (e.g., Exell 2015;MacDonald and Shaw 2004, 122-23). ...
... The common link between all is the perception and nature of beauty in ancient Egypt. The question of ancient Egyptian aesthetics is also explored in terms of context, practice and performative aspects of art (Baines 2015;Riggs 2016). ...
... Some captions preserve names of individual workers (Berman 2018.) 350 Baird 2011, 430-80;Riggs 2016;Baird 2017, 176-80;Riggs 2017bRiggs , 2019aRiggs , 2019bRiggs , 2020 when discussing the Seleucia excavation photographs in Chapter 7. Here, I merely recognize a common method, in this body of scholarship, of seeking to identify individual workers in field photographs. This search for individuals is largely undertaken, first, by correlating personal names in captions with photographic subjects and searching for identifiable individuals who reoccur across photographs and documents; secondly, by reflecting on the dearth of identifiable individuals in photographic archives and on what representations such images construct. ...
... Pengetahuan dasar dan pemahaman tentang tools yang mendukung temu kembali untuk memfasilitasi akses informasi (Anyim, 2020). Dapat diperoleh pemahaman bahwa tenaga profesional yang terlibat dalam mengelola koleksi sumber informasi baik di perpustakaan, lembaga kearsipan, dan museum dituntut untuk memiliki kompetensi yang mumpuni, dengan begitu ketika dihadapkan dengan koleksi yang berbeda dan membutuhkan perlakuan khusus mereka dapat mengelola sumber informasi tersebut dengan baik (Riggs, 2017). ...
... Egyptian mummies, and parts of mummies, were nothing new to Europe by the time the physician and 'male midwife' (obstetrical surgeon) Augustus Bozzi Granville set about unwrapping and dissecting a mummy in 1822-the original archiving process of my first example, known today as 'Dr Granville's mummy' (Riggs 2014, pp. 49-56;Riggs 2016). A brisk trade in powdered mumia operated for medicinal purposes in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, and whole mummies (some now identified as forgeries) or parts of mummies sometimes featured in collections of curiosities, like those of Hans Sloane and Peter Paul Rubens. ...