Christina Marini's research while affiliated with Adelphi University and other places

Publications (31)

Article
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Generativity, the capacity to be productive, caring, and concerned with the well-being of the next generation, has been linked to positive mental health outcomes and posttraumatic growth (Bellizzi, 2004). Generativity may be particularly important nowadays as older adults adjust to the pandemic and its aftermath. For example, after months of social...
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Loneliness is a robust predictor of aging veterans’ health. Even married older adults may experience loneliness if their relationships are of poor quality. We therefore examined facets of marital quality as predictors of loneliness within a sample of aging veterans: (1) companionship (relationship promotes connection to spouse) and (2) sociability...
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The initial conditions of the COVID-19 pandemic made it such that individuals—especially older adults—experienced uncertainty about their own health/well-being, as well as that of their loved ones and communities. The current study examined how older adults’ social context shaped their well-being (i.e., anxiety, depressive symptoms, and sleep quali...
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Some older adults may be particularly sensitive to the negative effects of social disruptions due to COVID-19 (Tyrrell & Williams, 2020). For example, the unique circumstances of the pandemic may have made greater sociability a liability (Wijngaards et al., 2020). The current study used a community sample of 136 older adults (M age = 67.77, range 5...
Chapter
Research on military families is credited for being a major catalyst in the development of the field of family science, dating back to the seminal studies of military families by luminaries like Reuben Hill (see Mancini et al., 2018). The 1993 edition of the Sourcebook is rife with examples of how family science was influenced by the military conte...
Article
The current study included an examination of social factors that mitigate or exacerbate insomnia symptoms among older adults who are married or living with a partner. We first examined the unique effects of spousal support and strain on insomnia symptoms and then evaluated the degree to which extramarital social factors (e.g., friend support) moder...
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Marital discord fuels depression, according to decades of research. Most prior studies in this area have focused on macro-longitudinal change in depression over the course of years, and on global ratings of marital satisfaction. Less work has examined fluctuations in depressed mood and marital discord in daily life, and none has investigated associ...
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Research indicates that discussing one's romantic relationship with one's partner benefits individual well-being and reduces uncertainty about the future of the relationship. Implications of relationship talk with friends remain less clear, though talking with friends may actually increase uncertainty about the relationship (e.g., by making one's p...
Article
Although the marital relationship is often the primary source of emotional support in adulthood, sole reliance on the spouse to discuss health-related issues may be harmful to the well-being of both partners. The first aim of this study was to examine whether declines in health during later life would be associated with poorer psychological well-be...
Article
Deployment requires considerable preparation for military families and changes to these plans may create notable stress. The current study leveraged data from a sample of military couples who experienced the cancellation of an overseas deployment to learn more about their experiences as they adjusted to this change. Guided by family stress and anti...
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Pathways through which spousal support and strain influence older adults’ well-being are poorly understood. We examined sleep quality and loneliness as mechanisms through which support and strain predict depressive symptoms across ten years utilizing National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project data. Our sample included partnered participants at...
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Older adults face heightened risks for loneliness due to social isolation. Low-quality relationships also fuel loneliness. Because living arrangements and family norms differ between countries, cultural differences may arise in the stress of isolation, loneliness, and difficult relationships. To examine social stress profiles in the US and Mexico,...
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Older adults age in the context of their intimate partnerships. Partners’ lives—their emotions, behaviors, and health—are intricately linked as they navigate the challenges associated with aging. This symposium presents research that illuminates ways partners influence one another later in life. The talks are diverse with regard to their timescale...
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Declining physical health likely affects not only older adults’ own well-being, but also that of their spouse. Using two waves of data from 610 couples in the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project, we examined effects of health declines over five years on change in self and spousal psychological well-being. Actor-Partner Interdependence Mo...
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Objectives Although the adverse link between rumination and sleep quality is well established, much of the literature neglects the role of social factors. This study examined the role of older adults’ perceived social support from spouses and from family/friends in modifying the association between trait rumination and sleep quality. Existing hypot...
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This symposium will examine positive and negative aspects of older adults’ relationships and their impacts on health and well-being. We will begin by reviewing the past decade of research on family gerontology. Seidel’s meta-analysis of 995 articles will identify prominent theories and methods, as well as remaining research gaps. The subsequent pre...
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Rumination is a maladaptive coping strategy that gives rise to and sustains stress. Individuals who ruminate more, therefore, tend to sleep more poorly. Studies of rumination and sleep often neglect the role of social context. Social support may buffer the degree to which rumination predicts poorer sleep quality. Further, individuals with more supp...
Article
Loneliness is a mechanism through which marital quality relates to older adults’ mental health. Links between marital quality, loneliness, and depressive symptoms, however, are often examined independent of older adults’ functional health. The current study therefore examines whether associations between marital quality, loneliness, and depressive...
Article
Prior wartime trauma likely acts as a double-edged sword that promotes both aging veterans' vulnerability and resilience in the context of the current COVID-19 pandemic. During this stressful time, aging veterans may benefit from having an array of socially supportive network ties. We therefore suggest that clinicians working with veterans encourag...
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Relationships are important for successful aging, but older military veterans (aged 65 and older) experience distinct barriers and challenges to social connection. We argue that theories of social connectedness and health in older adults do not fully reflect the experiences of veterans despite providing fundamental insight into the social needs of...
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Spousal caregivers of chronic pain patients may experience high levels of negative affect, perhaps in part because they regularly witness patients’ suffering. Yet, few studies have examined the relation between patients’ chronic pain and spousal caregivers’ negative affect. According to social cognitive theory, individuals’ self-efficacy may modula...
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Rumination, the act of dwelling on negative, unwanted thoughts, can stoke depression and disrupt sleep, both of which may threaten older adults’ well-being. In line with a support buffering hypothesis, a previous study of younger and middle-aged adults found that social support mitigated the positive association between rumination and negative mood...
Article
Objectives: Seminal research with spouses of chronic pain patients indicates that providing patients with instrumental support can be either costly or beneficial for spouses' well-being. Drawing from the invisible support literature, this study evaluated the extent to which patients' recognition of spouses' support moderated daily and long-term as...
Article
It is projected that by 2020 there will be 8.7 million veterans over the age of 65 years, more than half (64%) of whom served during the Vietnam War. The effects of military service on mental health and well-being may be more pronounced later in life among those who served in Vietnam than prior cohorts of veterans. Many veterans confront and rework...
Article
Pain catastrophizing has been shown to predict greater pain and less physical function in daily life for chronic pain sufferers, but its effects on close social partners have received much less attention. The overall purpose of the present study was to examine the extent to which pain catastrophizing is an interpersonal coping strategy that is mala...
Article
In light of technological advances enabling military couples to communicate throughout deployment, spouses of deployed service members often make decisions about what to share with service members, and how to respond to service members' concerns. In doing so, they manage an emotional boundary between service members and their families. This study f...
Article
Invisible support can benefit recipients’ well-being, according to studies of young adults coping with acute stressors. Little research has examined the impact of invisible support on support providers. To characterize the day-to-day effects of invisible support on support providers’ and recipients’ mood among older couples facing chronic pain, we...
Article
Objectives: This study identified daily associations between sleep, emotion, and marital functioning in the context of chronic pain. Because spouses' sleep is compromised on nights when patients experience more pain, we set out to identify implications of spouses' sleep for their own emotion (anger) upon waking and marital interaction (marital ten...
Article
This review considers existing literature about military and veteran families' deployment‐related experiences in relation to three separate, yet related, temporal rhythms. First, we consider military family functioning within a short‐term rhythm focused on dynamic family interactions (e.g., communicative exchanges) that occur daily. Next, we consid...
Article
Research on the merging of social networks among married couples tends to focus on the benefits of increased social capital, with the acknowledgment of potential stressors being limited primarily to in-law relationships. The purpose of the present study was to examine both positive (i.e., shared friend support) and negative (i.e., disapproval and i...

Citations

... In addition, there was a negative long-term association between one's depressive symptoms and life satisfaction. Prior research suggested that individuals with greater depressive mood responses to daily marital discord exhibited greater long-term increases in depressed mood and marital risk [35]. The current findings regarding the cross-lagged associations between depressive symptoms and life satisfaction added to the body of literature regarding the interrelations between these two constructs [17,18]. ...
... However, findings from a study conducted by Boren [36] on workers showed that a high level of perceived social support of individuals was associated with a high level of rumination among the workers. Marini et al. [37] conducted a study on older people and the findings showed that perceived social support for spouses was not significantly associated with rumination, and perceived social support for family members or friends was not significantly correlated with rumination. ...
... Inferior marital quality not only can negatively predict individuals' psychological health (3) but also can impair physical health (4). On the contrary, superior marital quality can be beneficial to improving marital stability (5), reducing psychological distress (6), mitigating loneliness, (7), and buffering negative emotions' adverse effects (8). Besides, related to individuals' physical activity and health behaviors, marital quality can also predict one's physical health (9). ...
... Homeless veterans are less likely than other veterans to receive healthcare and treatment (Rosenthal et al., 2021). The COVID-19 pandemic limited social interaction and access to care (Marini et al., 2020;Tsai & Wilson, 2020), likely contributing to the increases in US drug-related deaths in 2020 and 2021 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2022). ...
... A person's understanding of a partner's health-related experiences (e.g., pain severity, care values) often does not align with the partner's experiences, and the divergence in these reports influences subsequent behaviors and health outcomes (Berg et al., 2020;Moon et al., 2016). In addition, perceptions of Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/gerontologist/advance-article/doi/10.1093/geront/gnac187/6936409 by Auburn University user on 20 December 2022 A c c e p t e d M a n u s c r i p t provided and received support often do not converge, with research showing that provided support sometimes goes unrecognized (i.e., is -invisible‖) and has implications for both partners' well-being (Bolger et al., 2000;Godfrey et al., 2018;Marini et al., 2021). Finally, data from multiple sources create opportunities to assess key dyadic constructs, including (1) congruence (e.g., whether partners have similar satisfaction levels in the relationship), (2) accuracy or bias (e.g., comparison of partners' ratings to observers' ratings), and (3) idealization (e.g., the discrepancy between a person's ratings of their support provision and the partner's perceptions of received support) (Busby et al., 2009). ...
... Although support from personnel may aid partners in managing separations, this support may not be forthcoming; emotional difficulties were often minimized by partners, possibly more so by those reporting higher levels of depression. 33 Greater externalizing symptoms have been reported among children separated from a parent on deployment than among their peers. 34 This study suggests similar issues during weekly separations for younger children, and more extreme problems such as stress or anxiety for young people and children with additional needs, who may find such turbulence difficult to manage. ...
... Individuals who had a spouse or partner endorsed more items related to trauma re-engagement, as suggested recently by theorists who proposed that socioemotional support may aid Veterans in successfully navigating trauma re-engagement (Marini et al., 2020). Additionally, the importance of family support was also a common theme in qualitative responses to 'what gives you strength. ...
... Indeed, a partner's behavior may alter a person's neural threat processing of pain cues (Coan et al., 2006), or change their course of post-surgical recovery (Fekete et al., 2006) or the speed of woundhealing (Kiecolt-Glaser et al., 2005). Likewise, a person's symptom burden can impact the partner's physiology in the moment (Monin et al., 2010), their day-to-day health and wellbeing (Martire et al., 2013;Martire et al., 2019), and their long-term wellness (Lyons et al., 2014;Shaffer et al., 2016). Moreover, the dynamics that emerge between two partners can foreshadow the course of their health beyond either partner's self-report. ...
... 12 For example, university students reporting poorer sleep quality are more likely to express anger, as are adolescents who are also more likely to engage in aggressive behavior. 13,14 Spouses of chronic pain patients report more anger on mornings following poor sleep quality 15 and healthy adults are more likely to attribute hostile intentions to others' actions. 16 Research also suggests that sleep quality is a more robust predictor of anger and aggressive behavior than sleep quantity. ...
... Usually, in adolescence, the child was to be self-sufficient because the supposed teenager is not dependent on the parent. At the beginning of the age of the adolescents, the sign is already self-sufficient is not dependent on parents anymore (Ma & Grogan-Kaylor, 2017;Marini, Collins, & MacDermid Wadsworth, 2018;Negreiros et al., 2019). ...