Chong-Uk Kim's research while affiliated with Sonoma State University and other places

Publications (8)

Article
While studies on the wage effects of immigration focus on native workers, there is significantly less information on the wage effects of immigration on domestic foreign-born workers. In addition to analysing the impact of immigration on wages of native workers, in this article, we estimate the internal competition among foreign-born workers in the...
Article
Using newly developed Korean immigration data, we empirically test the networks effects prediction. The main contribution of this article is to go one step further in finding empirical evidence to support heterogeneity in networks effects. Using their visa type, we separate immigrants into two groups—skilled immigrants and unskilled immigrants—and...
Article
Using a vector autoregressive model (VAR) with 42 years of South Korean annual data, we empirically investigate two possible links between corruption and economic growth. Even though we find negative correlations between corruption and other growth variables such as private investment, we do not find any strong empirical evidence supporting negativ...
Article
This paper seeks evidence of the relationship between US households' consumption and imports, notably imports from China. Using MSA-level data from the consumer expenditure survey from 1986 to 2007, we find that in general imports, and especially those from China, are positively related with households' consumption. A one-percentage point increase...
Article
In this article, we investigate a positive tertiary education externality in 18 European countries. Using a simple Cobb-Douglas-type production function with constant returns to scale, we find that there are positive spillover effects from tertiary education in European countries. According to our model prediction, on average, 72,000 new employed p...
Article
This article investigates a positive college education externality in South Korea. Using a simple Cobb–Douglas-type Constant Returns to Scale (CRS) production function with South Korean educational data, we find that there are positive spillover effects from tertiary education in South Korea. According to our model prediction, new college graduates...
Article
Previous literature suggested that immigrants have a positive impact on international transactions such as exports. However, even though previous studies emphasize the role of individual and families in enhancing networks effects, none of these studies, surprisingly, have considered the heterogeneity of immigrants. Since each individual has differe...

Citations

... In the context of Thai manufacturing, it has been shown that unlike developed countries with educated migrants enabling R&D, unskilled immigration from neighboring countries like Myanmar or Cambodia is more like 'labor-saving account for this sharp rise. In 2013, the share of foreign-born people in total population was 13.1% with total 41 million immigrants in total(Kim and Lim 2017). ...
... From the skilled perspective of migrants, Lim and Kim (2011) and Mundra (2010) forwarded that skilled migrants significantly improved US trade with their home countries. More recently, Kim and Lim (2016) concluded that in the case of Korean imports, skilled relative to unskilled immigrants played an important role in creating networks between home and host countries. ...
... Researchers have therefore claimed that corruption deters growth by lowering private investment. Kim and Lim [10] also found a negative correlation between corruption and other growth variables such as private investment, but did not find strong statistical evidence to support the same claim between corruption and economic growth. Shao et al. [11] found a negative correlation between corruption levels and the long-term growth of a country. ...
... This research hypothesis is supported empirically in the case that our findings suggest negative (positive) associations between infection (recovery) rates and levels of educational achievement. In this context, numerous studies have demonstrated the positive externality of education and the related knowledge-spillover effects (e.g., Arbel et al., n.d.;Acemoglu & Angrist, 2000;Broersma, Edzes, & Van Dijk, 2016;Carlino, Hunt, Duranton, & Weinberg, 2009;Hong, Kim, Park, & Sim, 2019;Kim & Lim, 2012;McMahon, 2018;Ruhose, Thomsen, & Weilage, 2019;Sand, 2013;Schumacher, Dias, & Tebaldi, 2014). ...
... The value of college, however, has recently come under scrutiny. College degrees certainly advantage individuals in employment seeking (Greenstone & Looney, 2011;Zaback, Carlson, & Crellin, 2012), but experts differ on how much countries stand to gain by increasing their college-going populations (e.g., Goldin & Katz, 2008;Handel, in press;Lim & Kim, 2013;Vedder, Denhart & Robe, 2013;Wolf, 2009). ...
... Their results suggested that independent immigrants had the largest influence on trade, refugees the least, with family immigrants in between. From the skilled perspective of migrants, Lim and Kim (2011) and Mundra (2010) forwarded that skilled migrants significantly improved US trade with their home countries. More recently, Kim and Lim (2016) concluded that in the case of Korean imports, skilled relative to unskilled immigrants played an important role in creating networks between home and host countries. ...