Charlotte Hill's research while affiliated with University of California, Santa Barbara and other places

Publications (11)

Conference Paper
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With the growing movement to use visual block-based languages (VBBLs) in elementary and middle school classrooms, questions arise about the learning outcomes of such activities. While some schools are content to use VBBLs to spark interest and motivation for the future pursuit of computing, others are asking, Does this early exposure produce knowle...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Visual block-based programming environments allow elementary school students to create their own programs in ways that are more accessible than in textual programming environments. These environments help students write code by removing syntax errors and reducing typing. Students create code by dragging, dropping, and snapping constructs together (...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this paper, we present our analysis of 92 fourth graders' digital story projects completed in LaPlaya, a Scratch-like programming environment. Projects were analyzed for the way that students programmed the start of the story, and if the program integrated user-centered design by providing instruction to the user on how to interact with the digi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The recent growth of interest in computer science has created a movement to more readily introduce computer science in K-12 classrooms. However, little research exists on how to successfully bring computer science to lower grade levels. In this paper, we present advice for researchers and curriculum developers who are getting started working with c...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The recent renaissance in early computer science education has provided K-12 teachers with multiple options for introducing children to computer science. However, tools for teaching programming for children with wide-scale adoption have been targeted mostly at pre-readers or middle school and higher grade-levels. This leaves a gap for 4th -- 6th gr...
Chapter
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Computing has impacted almost all aspects of life, making it increasingly important for the next generation to understand how to develop and use software. Yet, a lack of research on how children learn computer science and an already impacted elementary school schedule has meant that very few children have the opportunity to learn computer science p...
Article
Full-text available
The desire to expose more students to computer science has led to the development of a plethora of educational activities[16, 7, 15, 4] and outreach programs to broaden participation in computer science. Despite extensive resources (time and money), they have made little impact on the diversity of students pursuing computer science. To realize larg...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Computational thinking, an approach to problem solving, is a key practice of science education rarely integrated into instruction in an authentic way. A second key practice, creating models of physical phenomenon, has been recognized as an important strategy for facilitating students' deeper understandings of both science concepts and the practices...
Conference Paper
Memristors offer many potential advantages over more traditional memory-cell technologies, including the potential for extreme densities, and fast read times. Current devices, however, are plagued by problems of yield, and durability. We present a limit study of an aggressive neural network application that has a high update rate and a strict laten...
Conference Paper
Many institutions have created and deployed outreach programs for middle school students with the goal of increasing the number and diversity of students who later pursue careers in computer science. While these programs have been shown to increase interest in computer science, there has been less work on showing whether participants learn computer...
Conference Paper
Scratch programming has risen in prominence, not only as a potential language for K-12 computer science, but also in introductory college courses. Unfortunately, grading Scratch programs is time-consuming, requiring manual execution of each program. Automation of this process is greatly complicated by the very reason Scratch is an attractive introd...

Citations

... With computer programming being sought as a desirable skill in the twenty-first century, policies and teaching strategies are being proposed to strengthen the production of coding connoisseurs. Curriculum adjustments are starting to become noticeable from integrating programming courses within compulsory education (Björkholm & Engström, 2017;Harlow et al., 2015) to simply establishing an ecosystem of learning computing (Seow et al., 2019). Pedagogies in computer programming are also being proposed to facilitate the creation of an effective learning environment. ...
... Transfer between programming languages does take place, but tends to require explicit guidance and is known to be challenging for novices and even seasoned programmers (see, e.g., [8,51,57,122,125,143]). Santos et al. [122] (p. ...
... Dong et al. [42] propose a tinkering environment for students when they struggle in problem-solving activities. Dwyer et al. [43] study the readability of block-based programs by students. ...
... Sounds is also common outputs for many computational toolkits. Sound can be combined with animation to produce multisensory effects [20,55], or being used on his own to produce music or stories [2,64]. Finally, many computational toolkits focus on haptic outputs, especially through the use of robots that can be moved in space according to specific instructions. ...
... Given the general acceptance of group work in the elementary grades as a teaching and learning strategy (i.e. collaborative inquiry, project-based problem-solving etc.) (Adams & Hamm, 1998;De Lisi & Golbeck, 1999) and the growing popularity of block-based programming for this age-range (Franklin et al., 2015), it seems worthwhile to explore pedagogical practices related to pair programming with elementary-aged students as well. ...
... Floors and Flexibility (Designing a Programming Environment for 4th-6th Grade Classrooms [22]): Several studies focused on Human-Computer Interaction show the differences between how children interact compared to adults. It is these differences that must therefore be kept in mind when designing visual tools for programming, since the development interface plays a fundamental role, as it aims to promote change in the students' roles as they transition from being mere users to developers. ...
... Both concepts are closely related to when specific sets of instructions are carried out. To program an Event, students should decide how to detect when a specific event occurs and which sets of instructions to carry out (Franklin et al., 2013). Scratch provides various events, such as "when flag clicked," "when (space) key pressed," "when this sprite clicked," and "when backdrop switches to (backdrop1)." ...
... Since the fabrication of the Hewlett Packard (HP) memristor [3], interest in memristor research has increased [4]. Several people have started to take advantage of the memristor capacities in different fields, such as analog applications [5][6][7][8][9][10], digital circuits and memories [11][12][13], and the neuromorphic field because of its analog storing capability [14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26]. ...
... Several researchers have been looking at evidence of learning in the context of programming activities using multiple types of analysis and tools. Some of these studies look at the learning outcomes by analyzing the final version of programming projects created on block-based programming environments such as Scratch to assign scores according to the structure and types of blocks included in the programs [8,22]. This kind of analysis, however, is usually designed with the final goal of attributing scores to students' projects and does not consider any information about their programming processes. ...
... Wilson et al analyze proficiency in grades four to seven, showing user interaction, loops and conditionals to be the most commonly used concepts [16]. Dwyer et al studied fourth grade students performing modified CS Unplugged activities, noting their inability to produce precise algorithms that scale [5]. Seiter and Foreman propose the Progression of Early Computational Thinking framework, which synthesizes evidence from student work with Scratch design patterns [13]. ...