Charles H. Lowe's research while affiliated with The University of Arizona and other places

Publications (39)

Article
Full-text available
We quantified aspects of hibernaculum use by desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) in the San Pedro Valley, Arizona. Tortoises hibernated primarily on steep south-facing slopes. Hibernacula included burrows in silt, silt with loose gravel, diatomite and/or diatomaceous marl, and beneath layers of well-lithified volcanic ash. Burrows were often also...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Chiricahua Mountain region offers an outstanding opportunity to manage an aquatic vertebrate fauna that is widely in decline or already threatened or endangered. The fauna is diverse, and potential economic conflicts with recovery of native aquatic species are few and limited. Including Aravaipa Creek, the San Pedro River, and Cajon Bonito in M...
Article
We present an algebraic method for estimating highway mortality in snakes, based on careful data collection during low-speed driving on paved roads. A total of 368 snakes (104 live, 264 dead) were recorded over four years on State Route 85 from Why to Lukeville, Pima Co., Arizona, during 15 525 km of road-cruising; mostly within Organ Pipe Cactus N...
Article
Full-text available
The Chiricahua Mountain region offers an outstanding opportunity to manage an aquatic vertebrate fauna that is widely in decline or already threatened or endangered. The fauna is diverse, and potential economic conflicts with recovery of native aquatic species are few and limited. Including Aravaipa Creek, the San Pedro River, and Cajon Bonito in M...
Article
The relationship between species and plant-form diversity was examined for associations of perennial plants on 2 Sonoran Desert bajadas - in Arizona, USA, and Sonora, Mexico. Plant associations on bajadas are composed of non-random sets of species with regard to form. Plant communities situated low on bajadas have fewer plant-forms than expected if...
Article
This paper interprets plant community dynamics within three major vegetation regions - the Sonoran desert, the Encinal and coniferous forest - which extend from 700 m to the summit (2 766 m) on the south slope of the Santa Catalina Mts., Arizona. On the bajada, Larrea tridentata and disturbed desert scrub communities have been degraded by overgrazi...
Article
The radiation flux at winter solstice is reported for desert microenvironments under Cercidium crowns and in open desert. In addition to the net radiation flux and that of the upper and lower hemispheres, hourly radiation temperatures (equivalent black-body temperatures) were measured for soil surfaces, sky, and tree crowns. Radiation temperature-t...
Article
1.1. Reptiles are able to escape the lethal effects of freezing by supercooling the entire body to as low as −8°C, 2–8°C below the freezing point of body tissues (ca. −0·6°C).2.2. Vertebrate blood samples supercool to as low as −14°C before freezing.3.3. The minimum amount of supercooling expected both for blood and intact animals corresponds to th...
Article
The apparently alloploid parthenogenetic species of Cnemidophorus have one primary center of distribution, which is in the North American Southwest adjacent to the Continental Divide and the area of confluence between the Rocky Mountains and the Mexican Plateau. Cnemidophorus cozumelus presents the single contrast to the distributional pattern of t...
Article
Analysis of chromosomes from representatives of most species groups of Bufo occurring in North America reveals striking similarities in the karyotypes of B. alvarius, B. cognatus, B. microscaphus, B. punctatus, B. retiformis, B. valliceps, and B. woodhousii. Each of these species has a diploid number of 22 chromosomes (metacentric and submetacentri...
Article
Full-text available
Karyotype evolution apparently involving Robertsonian centric fusion of chromosomes in iguanid reptilian species (Sceloporus clarki and Sceloporus magister) is consistent with the recent evidence pertaining to the evolution of North American Desert species of animals and plants derived from tropical and subtropical communities of the Madro-Tertiary...
Article
Open- and closed-system experimental designs were used to test comparative tolerance, survival, and potential natural selection in four species subjected to low dissolved oxygen concentration--the desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius), long-fin dace (Agosia chrysogaster), speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus), and Gila sucker (Catostomus clarki). Di...
Article
Winter-active February adults (vicinity Tuscon, Arizona) were observed to be supercooled during freezing nights in their desert habitat, with 24-hr minimum extremes reaching @O5.1@?C, and to become active (flying) a few minutes after the warming following sunrise. The LD"5"0 for experimental supercooling of the population sampled was @O7.73@?C, the...
Article
Regression analysis (analysis of covariance) is contrasted with the conventional "mean period length" for estimating the length of period of the spontaneous activity frequency (free-running period) in population samples of Gila monsters (Heloderma suspectum) and kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) in the Sonoran Desert. The mean period length in eac...
Article
Karyotypes of many species of the genus Sceloporus support the generalization that there are no morphologically recognizable sex chromosomes in lizards; however, there is a marked sexual dimorphism in the karyotypes of Sceloporus jarrovi and Sceloporus poinsetti. During meiosis in males, whose diploid number of chromosomes is 31, preferential segre...
Article
Testicular structure in bisexual teiid lizards (Cnemidophorus and Ameiva) is apparently unique among vertebrates in having a circumtesticular subtunic band of Leydig (interstitial) cells, that varies in species of Cnemidophorus from 1.2 to 42.1 cells in thickness (transverse cross-section), between the outer tunic (tunica albuginea) and the seminif...
Article
Reproduction in Cnemidophorus tigris at Tucson, Arizona follows a seasonal cycle in which gonadal size is minimal in September-October. Male reproductive organs gradually recrudesce during the winter months spent underground. After the lizards emerge from hibernation in March-April the testis, seminiferous epithelial height and tubule diameter grad...
Article
The colors of living amphibians and reptiles have been studied, using a General Electric recording reflectance spectrophotometer. The animals were brought to activity temperature levels and the appropriate surface pressed over the reflectance port of the machine while a color record was taken. Background samples from the localities at which the ani...
Article
Within the Mojave, Sonoran, and Chihuahuan Desert subdivisions of the North American Desert in the U.S., more than half of 143 total amphibian and rep- tilian species perform as riparian and/or wetland taxa. For the reptiles, but not the amphibians, there is a sig- nificant inverse relationship between riparianness (obli- gate through preferential...

Citations

... Las características edáficas tienen un papel importante en el tipo de comunidades vegetales establecidas, por ejemplo, la separación espacial de las especies de plantas de acuerdo con los factores del suelo es bien conocida (Warming 1909;Ellenberg 1939;Yang & Lowe 1956;Whittaker& Niering 1965;Austin & Austin 1980;Goldberg 1982;Nagy & Proctor 1997;Bigelow & Canham. 2002), a su vez dichas propiedades tienen relaciones entre sí que derivan de la dinámica del suelo y dependen de las condiciones geomorfológicas y climáticas. ...
... Originally Isthmura sierraoccidentalis was described as a subspecies of Pseudoeurycea belli by Lowe et al. (1968), recently it was elevated to full species status by Rovito et al. (2015). ...
... The divergence between island and mainland populations has been studied also by Kramer and Mertens (1938) and by Eisentraut (1950) in lizards, and by Lowe (1955) in mammals and reptiles. Most data agree in showing that the divergence is greater on smaller than on larger islands, and greater on islands more remote from the mainland than on those which are apt to receive immigrants most frequently. ...
... For example, cold exposure primes fat body cycles for seasonal fasting (Derickson 1976) and turtle brains for winter anoxia (Couturier et al. 2019) and is also the trigger for metabolic depression. Sensitivity to these cues may be seasonal or year-round: for example, Uta stansburiana show the same metabolic response to extreme low temperatures in summer as in winter (Halpern and Lowe 1968). Finally, environmental temperature plays a critical role in regulating reproductive cycles. ...
... As spring and summer progressed, sampling commenced either earlier or later, depending on the time of sunrise, in an attempt to offset the effects of changing photoperiod and temperature. Surveys were not conducted during inclement weather, such as on days with excessive cloud cover or wind, variables which are known to reduce lizard activity (e.g., Rosen & Lowe 1996). Table 2b andFigure 4). ...
... The earliest papers on chromosomal variation and evolution in the genus Sceloporus presented mitotic karyotypes visualized by conventional staining, and focused primarily on relationships within species groups native to the desert regions of the southwestern US and western Mexico [Hall, 1965;Lowe et al., 1967;Cole and Lowe, 1968;Cole, 1970Cole, , 1971aCole, , b, 1972Cole, , 1975Cole, , 1977Jackson and Hunsaker, 1970]. Subsequent studies by Hall [1973Hall [ , 1980Hall [ , 1983 extended to the entire genus, and also focused on the diverse chromosome races of the Sceloporus grammicus complex [see also Hall and Selander, 1973]. ...
... Le chapitre 16 développe les soins à prodiguer aux jeunes afin qu'ils parviennent à l'âge adulte pour se reproduire à leur tour : conditions de détention captive ( Je n'ai noté que peu d'absences dans cette bibliographie tout comme dans celle du chapitre rédigé par Aaron Bauer. Parmi les références manquantes, celles qui me semblent importantes sont : Arrington (1930), McNeil et Hinshaw (1946), Brown et Lowe (1954), Wermuth (1958), Mebs (1970), Campbell et Lamar (1989, Cooper (1989), Goldberg et Lowe (1997), Ast (2001), Pianka et al. (2004), Böhme et Ziegler (2008), Losos et al. (2012), Vidal et al. (2012), Barrows et al. (2013), Wright et al. (2013), Yi et Norell (2013) Très richement illustré par plus de 370 photographies en couleur, cet ouvrage s'adresse principalement aux éleveurs du monstre de Gila (Heloderma suspectum) pour qui il constituera sans aucun doute une véritable Bible. Il renferme une excellente synthèse des connaissances acquises sur cette espèce et plus largement sur le genre Heloderma. ...
... The effect of salinity on the condition factor of the desert pupfish was more evident in the Cerro Prieto population, where the high salinity (24–40 ppt) operated as a chemical barrier against the presence of non-native fishes (VarelaRomero et al., 2003). In this sense, the members of the genus Cyprinodon are well known because of their highly unusual tolerances to environmental extremes (Lowe et al., 1967; Brown and Feldmeth, 1971), occurring in habitats that often have unusually high temperatures (>40°C) and salinities as high as four times the sea water (Miller, 1948; Barlow, 1958; Bennett and Beitinger, 1997; Beitinger et al., 2000 ). Tolerances to high salinities allow the pupfishes to occur in systems where they would be potentially excluded due to their poor competitive abilities (Echelle et al., 1972; Kodric-Brown and Mazzolini, 1992). ...
... Descriptions of the tadpole (as B. valliceps) were presented by Wright (1929) and, in the form of dichotomous keys, were presented by Altig (1970), Altig et al. (1998), and Dodd (2013); Limbaugh & Volpe (1957) and Gosner (1960) described the tadpole through early development. Chromosomal information was presented by Cole et al. (1968), Bachman (1970), and Beck & Mahan (1979). ...
... In addition to genetic factors, non-genetic factors can strongly influence colouration . Non-genetic factors can include those experienced recently by individuals such as diet, body temperature and substrate colour (Norris & Lowe, 1964;Stuart-Fox et al., 2017;Umbers et al., 2016), those experienced early during ontogeny (Biard et al., 2007;Evans & Sheldon, 2015;Hubbard et al., 2015) and those experienced by their parents (Jensen et al., 2006;Spivak et al., 1990;Tsuruta et al., 1989). Temperature is important through all of these pathways of exposure and can have a long-lasting influence on colouration (Kooi & Brakefield, 1999). ...