Catherine M. Hall's research while affiliated with Murdoch University and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Roaming pet cats Felis catus are a significant conservation issue because they may hunt, harass and compete with wildlife; spread disease, interbreed with cats in feral populations, and hybridise with wild native felids. Studies of the roaming behaviour of pet cats are often hampered by modest sample sizes and variability between cats, limiting sta...
Data
Raw data underpinning the analysis of Rasch location scores reported in Fig 3. Res loc: location scores for the restriction scale. Ster loc: location scores for the desexing scale. Wild loc: location scores for the Wildlife scale. (XLS)
Data
Raw data underpinning the analysis of specific survey questions reported in Table 3. There is a separate spreadsheet for each question. 0 = agreement with the question, 1 = disagreement with the question. (XLS)
Article
Full-text available
International differences in practices and attitudes regarding pet cats' interactions with wildlife were assessed by surveying citizens from at least two cities in Australia, New Zealand, the UK, the USA, China and Japan. Predictions tested were: (i) cat owners would agree less than non-cat owners that cats might threaten wildlife, (ii) cat owners...
Article
Full-text available
Roaming pet cats kill and harass wildlife, hybridise with wild felids, interbreed with feral populations, spread disease or annoy neighbours, and endanger their own welfare by fighting, being struck by vehicles or ingesting poisons. Confinement of pet cats is unpopular, so alternative methods to curb roaming behaviour would benefit wildlife conserv...
Article
Full-text available
Many pet cats hunt and, irrespective of whether or not this threatens wildlife populations, distressed owners may wish to curtail hunting while allowing their pets to roam. Therefore we evaluated the effectiveness of three patterned designs (simple descriptions being rainbow, red and yellow) of the anti-predation collar cover, the Birdsbesafe® (BBS...

Citations

... First, in terms of the environment, due to the limited home ranges of pet cats ; but see Hall et al. 2016a), their environment could have a major influence on prey availability. For instance, the fluctuations in bird abundances across rural-to-urban landscapes (Lepczyk et al. 2004) could influence the predation rate of pet cats and modify their impact on bird communities. ...
... However, no consensus arose regarding the effect of different intrinsic characteristics. Hall et al. (2016b) reported no difference in the predation rate of desexed and intact cats. While Robertson (1998) showed that the body condition of cats did not influence the frequency of captures, the number of birds and herpetofauna brought home per cat reported by Woods et al. (2003) was negatively related to the cat's age and condition. ...
... In the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, and other countries, there is an ongoing debate about whether cats should be allowed to freely roam outdoors [2]. Concerns about the ecological impact of cats on wildlife populations and native species, feline transmission of zoonotic diseases, and the inconvenience that roaming cats might cause to other people have led to various suggested initiatives, including night curfews, collars with bells, cat-free buffer zones around nature reserves or sensitive conservation areas, and routine confinement [3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10]. Another factor supporting indoor confinement is the concern that free-ranging cats may be injured by other cats, humans, cars or predators (e.g., feral dogs, coyotes, wolves) [11]. ...
... Depending on their biodiversity awareness, the owners may also deliberately set up known strategies to limit predation by their pet cats. These strategies range from keeping the cats indoors (e.g., Calver et al. 2011) to the use of specific devices such as collar-mounted predation deterrents or bells that impede predatory behavior or alert prey, thus reducing their success of killing birds (Calver et al. 2007;Hall et al. 2015;Read 2019), although they are not universally accepted (Thomas et al. 2012). ...