Carly Hagel's research while affiliated with Queen's University and other places

Publications (7)

Article
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Objective: The scholarly dissemination of innovative medical education practices helps broaden the reach of this type of work, allowing scholarship to have an impact beyond a single institution. There is little guidance in the literature for those seeking to publish program evaluation studies and innovation papers. This study aims to derive a set...
Article
Objectives: Simulation-based education (SBE) is an important training strategy in emergency medicine (EM) postgraduate programs. This study sought to characterize the use of simulation in FRCPC-EM residency programs across Canada. Methods: A national survey was administered to residents and knowledgeable program representatives (PRs) at all Cana...
Article
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A key skill for successful clinician educators is the effective dissemination of scholarly innovations and research. Although there are many ways to disseminate scholarship, the most accepted and rewarded form of educational scholarship is publication in peer-reviewed journals. This paper provides direction for emergency medicine (EM) educators int...
Article
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Simulation-based medical education (SBME) is an important training strategy in emergency medicine (EM) postgraduate programs yet the extent of its use is variable. This study sought to characterize the use of simulation in FRCP-EM residency programs across Canada. Methods: A national survey was administered to residents (PGY2-5) and program represe...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: The use of high-fidelity simulation is emerging as an effective method for competency-based assessment in postgraduate medical education. We have previously reported the development of the Queen’s Simulation Assessment Tool (QSAT), for use in simulation-based Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) for Emergency Medicine (E...
Article
Full-text available
Queen’s University Emergency Medicine Simulation OSCE: an Advance in Competency-Based Assessment - Volume 18 Issue 3 - Carly Margaret Hagel, Andrew Koch Hall, Jeffrey Damon Dagnone

Citations

... The area where students feel most unprepared is critical patient management [4,5]. For this reason, courses, training modules have been applied and outcomes have been evaluated in many studies to provide these competencies [6,7,8]. Simulation based education (SBE) courses and programs have been found to be beneficial for preparing future physicians for emergency conditions [9,10,11,12]. ...
... To respond to the expanding and evolving profile of users and contributors and to inform new educational content moving forward, an intervention was needed to ensure that the needs of the EM Sim Cases audience were being met. As in most curricular or education innovation reforms, a formal needs assessment is critical to ensure the program in question continues to have its desired impact [1]. Using the Massive Online Needs Assessment (MONA) methodology [2], we set out to define both the reader's perceived needs and the needs that readers were prompted to identify via an online survey. ...
... Our data demonstrated that EM Sim Cases is frequently used to support educational curricula at the program and institutional levels. EM Sim Cases may serve to overcome some of the commonly reported barriers to simulation-based education, including lack of time and medical simulation expertise [7][8]. Specifically, a standardized template reduces the time required to start from scratch, an intimidating undertaking for those unfamiliar with simulation case design. ...
... Step 4: Charting the Data Based on our research questions and informed by previous scoping review studies completed by our lead author, [21][22][23][24][25] we designed a data extraction tool incorporating the Cook, Bordage, and Schmidt framework for different types of scholarships (description, justification, and clarification). 26 We also attempted to classify the outcomes measured in empirical studies according to Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework. ...
... The two modifications were (1) the development of generic behavioral anchors for resuscitation performance using a modified Delphi process [29] for each domain (primary assessment, diagnostic actions, therapeutic actions and communication) and (2) the replacement of the global assessment scale with a contemporary entrustment scale [30]. A pilot study has demonstrated a strong correlation between the existing/original global assessment score of the QSAT and the chosen entrustment score [31]. ...
... 8 Simulation is taking on a rapidly growing role that is predicted to increase significantly with the implementation of competency-based medical education (CBME). [9][10][11][12] The translational evidence supporting simulation for procedural learning is certainly not overwhelmingly positive; however, its role is indisputable where traditional experiences are either inadequate or unavailable. [13][14][15][16][17][18][19] For high-acuity, lowopportunity procedural scenarios, simulation learning should be considered mandatory as opposed to the unacceptable alternative of lowering the competence bar or excluding certain potentially lifesaving interventions declaring them as unnecessary because of their infrequent occurrence in clinical practice. ...
... To evaluate the TS through simulation training, Queen's simulation assessment tool (QSAT) [18] was used. Based on the neonatal resuscitation algorithm [19], the tool was modified and used according to the advice of a professor of pediatrics at Ajou University Medical Center. ...