C. Hawley's research while affiliated with The University of Queensland and other places

Publications (8)

Article
Clinical Trial Networks in which trialists work collaboratively enable multi-site, large-scale, high-quality clinical trials to be efficiently run. Although the benefits of Clinical Trial Networks are largely known, establishing a Clinical Trial Network can be complex. There are many factors for clinicians and researchers to consider, and there is...
Article
Background: Benefits of phosphate-lowering interventions on clinical outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are unclear; systematic reviews have predominantly involved dialysis patients. This study aimed to summarize evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning benefits and risks of non-calcium-based phosphate-loweri...
Article
Background There is an increase in older patients receiving kidney transplant internationally. This study describes older kidney transplant recipient outcomes in Australia and New Zealand. Methods The study included all adult first kidney transplant recipients in Australia and New Zealand from 2000 to 2015. Survival and graft outcomes were compare...
Article
Full-text available
Background Arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) for haemodialysis often experience early thrombosis and maturation failure requiring intervention and/or central venous catheter (CVC) placement. This secondary and exploratory analysis of the FAVOURED study determined whether omega-3 fatty acids (fish oils) or aspirin affected AVF usability, intervention rat...

Citations

... Clinical research networks within other specialty societies have proved effective in setting research priorities, promoting research collaborations and providing research training. [2][3][4][5][6] Such networks have facilitated large multicentre studies by bringing together like-minded researchers with clinical expertise and knowledge, providing a forum to advertise and share projects aligned with identified priorities, and attracting funding through advocacy. 5,6 Publications in high-impact journals and dissemination of results through local and international collaborations has led to changes in clinical guidelines and ultimately clinical practice. ...
... There are limited data concerning clinical cardiovascular consequences of phosphate-lowering agents [7]. Future measurements of the serum calcification propensity in future studies in young renal failure patients would be of great interest, a method that represents a functional nanoparticle-based in vitro test, which time-dependently determines the calcification propensity of patient serum also in children with chronic kidney failure undergoing haemodialysis as recently published by Kakajiwala et al. [8]. ...
... [17][18][19] Systemic medical therapies involving the use of antiplatelet agents (aspirin and clopidogrel), omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (fish oils), and statins reduce VA failure by promoting VA maturation and reducing stenosis and thrombosis through antiproliferative, antiaggregatory, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilatory effects. [20][21][22] In our report, aspirin use was not associated with VA patency, similar to the results from other studies. For example, Kim et al reported a large-scale prospective study in which aspirin did not show a protective effect on vascular patency. ...