C. E. Wieman's research while affiliated with University of Colorado Boulder and other places

Publications (4)

Chapter
A number of instruments have been designed to probe the variety of attitudes, beliefs, expectations, and epistemological frames taught in our introductory physics courses. Using a newly developed instrument - the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS)[1] - we examine the relationship between students’ beliefs about physics and oth...
Chapter
Every physics instructor knows that the most engaged and successful students tend to sit at the front of the class and the weakest students tend to sit at the back. However, it is normally assumed that this is merely an indication of the respcccive seat location preferences of weaker and stronger students. Here we present evidence suggesting that i...
Chapter
The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) is a new instrument designed to measure student beliefs about physics and about learning physics. This instrument extends previous work by probing additional aspects of studrnL beliefs and by IKMUT wording suitjble for students in a wide variety of physics courses. The CLASS has been vali...
Chapter
The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) is a new instrument designed to measure various facets of student attitudes and beliefs about learning physics. This instrument extends previous work by probing additional facets of student attitudes and beliefs. It has been written to be suitably worded for students in a variety of diffe...

Citations

... The developers of the original CLASS responded to Douglas et al. [34], critiquing its methodology and findings [36]. They argued that nuances in student beliefs were lost with a reduced factor structure, and that using a subset of the original survey would "substantially reduce its utility" (p. ...
... Insights into the influential role that seating arrangement can have on students' cognitive performance derived from studies investigating learning skills in association with the habitual seating location of an individual in the classroom (Marshall & Losonczy-Marshall, 2010;Perkins & Wieman, 2005). In one of these studies, Pichierri and Guido (2016) longitudinally followed five marketing classes attended by young adults, exploring students' achievement in terms of grades. ...
... In this regard, Kazakhstan is no exception. Recently Balta et al. (2020) showed that male high-school students in Kazakhstan had significantly more positive attitudes than that of female high-school students on the Colorado learning attitudes about science survey (Adams et al., 2006). In their research, Almukhambetova and Kuzhabekova (2020) identified four factors (self-efficacy, family values, school factors, and cultural influences) that influenced Kazakh girls' interest in STEM as a future career. ...
... Although survey instruments such as CLASS-Phys (Perkins et al., 2005), CLASS-Chem (Barbera et al., 2008), CLASS-Bio (Semsar et al., 2011), MPEX (Redish et al., 2000), and CHEMX (Grove & Bretz, 2007) were developed between 1998-2011, these surveys were designed to measure attitudes, beliefs, and expectations about learning in chemistry, physics, or biology courses, which do not necessarily include epistemological beliefs. Duell's report, however, provided a useful list of instruments (from inventories to interviews to vignettes), organizing them by uni-or multidimensional constructs and providing theoretical frameworks. ...