Brian Rosebury's research while affiliated with University of Central Lancashire and other places

Publications (4)

Chapter
The imaginative conception explored in Chapter 1 poses formidable difficulties of narrative construction and of style. A design of exceptional amplitude, multiplicity and expansiveness needs somehow to be reconciled with narrative energy and cohesion; and the resources of twentieth-century English language have to be deployed, without being wrenche...
Chapter
In The Lord of the Rings, the work of his prime (it was begun in 1937, his forty-sixth year, and published in 1954–5), Tolkien realised for the first and only time the full potential of his creative imagination. The realisation was possible for two reasons: firstly because he constructed here a uniquely expansive form, which allowed the fullest emb...
Chapter
At the beginning of 1900, John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, aged exactly eight, was living with his widowed mother and younger brother in a brick cottage in Sarehole, a tiny Warwickshire village. Though it was only four miles from the industrial centre of Birmingham, Sarehole, with its nearby farms, its mill by the riverside, its willow-trees, its pool wi...
Chapter
Tolkien’s literary career spans almost sixty years, from shortly after the outbreak of the Great War in 1914, when he was twenty-two, until shortly before his death in 1973. Roughly the middle third of his creative life (1937–1955) is dominated by the composition of The Lord of the Rings. But the first third was a period of apprenticeship, of schol...