Brett Lashua's research while affiliated with University College London and other places

Publications (55)

Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the relationship between khat-chewing and feelings of collective sociality amongst older and middle-aged men living in Britain's Somali diaspora. The research's core investigates the feeling of moral connectivity, a sense of belonging with others based around a shared reading of Somali-British identity. Here, the paper explores...
Article
This Special Issue centralizes powerful leisure stories that may otherwise be understood as myths—sometimes recognized, often less so—that circulate in the field, and beyond. In everyday use, a myth perpetuates a popularly held belief that is false or untrue. However, in social and cultural theory, myths are more complex, as partial truths that pri...
Article
This editorial sets the conceptual frame of reference for the special issue. It examines key themes at the intersection of activist leisure and critical event studies. Drawing on a wide range of social and leisure theory, we establish the critical lens of the Disrupt! project. Funded by Leeds Beckett University, Disrupt! used a variety of innovativ...
Article
Full-text available
As the world grapples with the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, on almost every news website, across social media, and also in its (many) absences, leisure has taken on new significance in both managing and negotiating a global crisis. Amidst the disruption, inconvenience, illness, fear, uncertainty, tragedy and loss from this disease, there are al...
Article
In this article, we investigate the discursive context of community-based youth centers to critically interrogate ideas and practices concerning leisure, youth, and youth centers. Using publicly available documents and data collected with youth at two community-based youth centers, we ask, what is the “good”’ they do for young people, and how do yo...
Article
This article introduces our bicycle-based cinema device—the “kino-cine- bomber”—as a vehicle to re-imagine disused buildings and obsolete urban infrastructure for re-activated public leisure spaces. It is also a vehicle to conceptualize theoretical relations among leisure, architecture, cinematic geographies, and urban spaces. Through these lenses,...
Chapter
This book is a sequel to our first book, Sounds and the City: Popular Music, Globalization and Place (2014). It continues the conversations by tuning into various soundings of urban life as measured out in music. As with the first book, which germinated in conversations among the co-editors as colleagues chatting about popular music—from recent gig...
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Closing off the book, the co-editors offer reflections on the breadth and depth of case studies included and the potential for further scholarship at the intersections of popular music and cities.
Chapter
Focused on Cleveland, Ohio, this chapter asks how “music cities” make their claims-to-fame. What underscores Cleveland’s assertion as the “birthplace” of rock ‘n’ roll and, since 1995, the site of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? Drawing from archival research, the chapter explores a microhistorical case study of the city’s popular music heritage. C...
Book
This book draws from a rich history of scholarship about the relations between music and cities, and the global flows between music and urban experience. The contributions in this collection comment on the global city as a nexus of moving people, changing places, and shifting social relations, asking what popular music can tell us about cities, and...
Article
Khat-chewing, a controversial leisure activity within the Somali diaspora in Britain, has received little attention within the academic field of Leisure Studies. This paper reports on ethnographic research to provide insights into the unique locations where young British-Somali men chew khat, exposing the liminal qualities of such localities. The p...
Article
There is a long, underlying presence of futurology—attempts to predict the future based on current or past events—throughout much of the leisure literature. On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of Leisure Sciences, I build on the work of futures scholars (e.g., Adam, 2008 Adam, B. (2008). Future matters: Futures known, created and minded. Twenty...
Book
This is the first handbook devoted entirely to leisure theory, charting the history and philosophy of leisure, theories in religion and culture, and rational theories of leisure in the Western philosophical tradition, as well as a range of socio-cultural theories from thinkers such as Adorno, Bauman, Weber and Marx. Drawing on contributions from ex...
Chapter
This chapter traces the philosophical turn toward Anti-Humanism via the Futurists, an artistic and social movement that flared in the early-twentieth century as a radical response to Humanism. Brashly bombastic, the Futurists embraced speed, technology, machinery, cities, noise, pollution, youth and violence. Published in 1909, Marinetti’s “Manifes...
Chapter
In this introduction to the Palgrave Handbook of Leisure Theory, the editors make the case for the book’s structure and format, and its focus on leisure theory. They discuss the history and development of leisure studies, and its relationship to sociology, cultural studies and other related disciplines and subject fields.
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores research on the power of myth (Barthes 1972) and commonly accepted beliefs, or “doxa” (Bourdieu, 1977), in shaping creative practices inside recording studios. Drawing from two ethnographic case studies of rock and hip-hop artists in recording studios, this paper addresses the (re)production of myths during studio sessions. Thro...
Article
Critical conversations concerning if and how dance ‘fits’ within current (dominant) discourse across physical activity (PA), public health (PH) and sport policy are presented here in the form of commentaries from a ‘collective’ research base and individual ‘worldviews’ that includes the director of an established community-based dance organisation,...
Article
This paper spotlights the sporting lives of young people who live in ‘Redcrest’, a public housing community in the Niagara region of Canada. We report on data culled from neighborhood-centric documents (municipal data, planning council reports, media coverage) and ethnographic fieldwork (interviews, community mapping, go-alongs) collected over eigh...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on a temporary, site-specific ‘pop up’ cinema held in May 2012 at Marshall’s Mill, Leeds (UK), as a case study of changing urban leisure landscapes. In contrast to the Cineplex, pop up cinema has been described a ‘grassroots movement, where audiences get to participate and experience films communally in unique locations’ (Benne...
Article
The recording studio has been somewhat neglected as a site for ethnographic fieldwork in the field of ethno-musicology and, moreover, the majority of published studies tend to overlook the specific concerns faced by the researcher within these contexts. Music recording studios can be places of creativity, artistry, and collaboration, but they often...
Article
This article centralizes changes within Leeds’ popular ‘musicscape’, i.e., the relations between popular music and urban landscape. Focusing on Leeds’ extreme heavy metal musicscape, we map sites of the Leeds metal scene (past and present) in order to understand the shifting social relationships, effects of city centre regeneration, and the ways in...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines and reconceptualises transgression in the Leeds extreme metal music subculture through theories of performance, embodiment and spectacle. The spectacle, for Debord (1967), is a social relation that is alienating and mediated by images and technology. At a live extreme metal concert fans subvert social norms, challenge gendered e...
Chapter
In Bruce Chatwin’s account of Aboriginal song and travel, The Songlines, the author asked ‘if a musical phrase is a map reference?’ ‘Music’, he is told, ‘is a memory bank for finding one’s way around the world’ (1987, p. 120). Borrowing from Chatwin, this chapter is concerned less with the sounds of a particular city (although cities figure promine...
Chapter
This book is about popular music and place, principally cities. From Charlie Gillett’s (1970) The Sound of the City and Iain Chambers’ (1985) Urban Rhythms to more recent work such as Krims’ (2007) Music and Urban Geography, attention to popular music has allowed various soundings of the often unfathomable aspects of urban life. Cities have been sp...
Chapter
As an area of popular and academic interest, the particular nexus of popular music, cities, and globalization continues, and will continue, to generate much discussion, within academia and beyond. This volume originated from conversations among the co-editors about popular music, its histories, and places. As we agreed in our initial conversations,...
Article
‘Pop-up’ cinema is a phenomenon in which films are screened publicly at ad hoc venues, often outdoors – e.g. car parks, brownfield sites, beneath roadway flyovers, parks or pedestrianised spaces – screenings can ‘pop up’ literally anywhere. Through the case of a pop-up cinema in May 2012 at Marshall's Mill, a protected heritage site in Leeds (UK),...
Article
This article reports on research that aimed to understand, through a collaborative music-making studio project, how young urban musicians might build a community that could transgress perceived cultural and racialized boundaries and ‘reclaim’ the city centre through their lyrics and performances. The Liverpool One Project involved sixteen weeks of...
Article
This article focuses on one particular fanzine – Merseysound – and how it provides a grassroots account of Liverpool’s post-punk scene over a three-year period (1979–1982). The fanzine draws attention to the material and historical context of the post-punk scene and provides a rich and detailed mapping of the performance venues connected to it. Thi...
Article
Liverpool, famously once the home of the Beatles and still the locus of many thriving music scenes, is a city of dramatic memories and transformations. Recently, the city has witnessed an ambitious regeneration agenda that is predicated upon leisure, heritage, culture and entertainment that culminated with the city's re-invention as 2008 European C...
Chapter
This chapter embraces the paradox that Hoggart expressed (above) in rela tion to two prevailing twenty-first century music and leisure phenomena: Pop Idol reality TV talent programmes and digital music piracy. Certainly more is at stake in popular music than the aversion and compulsion these phenomena provoke; however, at the end of 2009, two news...
Article
Liverpool is widely recognized for its iconic ‘Three Graces’—a trio of grand buildings that stand along the city’s River Mersey waterfront. In this article we argue that there are a similar kind of iconic ‘three graces’ in Liverpool’s popular music and heritage landscapes: the Cavern Club, Eric’s Club, and Cream. These three venues have taken on br...
Article
This paper explores a documentary film‐making approach to leisure scholarship and practice. Two films – Crossing the Line (2007) and Crossing the Line: Northern Exposure (2008) produced by young people to address issues of violence and the politics of place – provide the specific focus of the paper. These films illustrate youth perspectives of neig...
Chapter
Music has been closely related to movement. Popular musicianship, for example, is commonly spoken and written about using metaphors of mobility: musicians go out on the road, on tour, or gig in the club circuit (Laing, 2008) and most, like the musician noted above, come back. The language of popular music is suffused with movement. For example, the...
Article
This article is concerned with the interplay of young people's biographies and transforming landscapes in south-east Wales. In particular the article focuses on a South Wales Valleys town, Ebbw Vale, to explore how changes to a place can be understood in relation to, and alongside youth transitions. The article reports on the ways in which narrativ...
Article
In this article, a constitutive aspect of the everyday world is attended to, which is too often absent or suppressed in social scientific accounts of social life: noise. A question is raised as to how social science has addressed the question of noise, through a reconsideration of sound and the everyday. Conventional “good practice” for the organiz...
Article
This paper, as indeed the entire special issue, starts from the commonplace proposition that leisure and popular culture go hand in hand. On one hand, popular leisure practices are so much around us that it is easy to take them for granted. On the other hand, these very same practices provide key conduits to social and cultural power, individual ag...
Article
In this paper we describe a spatial approach toward leisure inquiry to report in part on a three‐year, arts‐based ethnographic study conducted through an urban recreation music program called The Beat of Boyle Street. Adopting the French philosopher/sociologist Henri Lefebvre's concepts of “rhythmanalysis” (2004) and the social “production of space...
Article
This paper uses performance as a means of conceptualizing and writing leisure research. This research reports on a three‐year arts‐based ethnographic study of a music‐making programme conducted with Aboriginal young people in Edmonton, Canada, and explores young people's rap music performances. I especially make note of how the research narrative m...
Article
Full-text available
This paper represents musical remixing practices as a means of conducting leisure research. Our research engaged urban Aboriginal-Canadian youth through The Beat of Boyle Street, a music technology program used to teach young people how to produce their own remixes. Through this program we developed a “research remix” of narrative, Indigenous and a...
Article
This article discusses soundscapes created by young people participating in The Beat of Boyle Street, an in-school recreation-based project that teaches inner-city, at-risk youth to make music using computers and audio production software. Participants are predominantly Aboriginal youth, ages 14 to 20, living in poverty and confronting other challe...
Article
This research presents an autoethnographic strategy for self-reflection by sharing stories consistent with Indigenous methodologies and establishing a frame for re-mixing leisure theory. As an autoethnographic study, we reflect on how we have been engaged, changed, and challenged to rethink understandings of leisure and ourselves as leisure scholar...
Article
In this article, we explored ways youth, traditionally silenced, engaged with popular culture to voice experiences and challenge dominant narratives of public schools and daily lives. We also considered how educators use popular culture as critical pedagogy with inner city youth. Through ethnographic bricolage and case study methods, and drawing fr...
Article
In this paper I take note of 'the arts of the remix', in which techniques of producing hip-hop music with First Nations young people in Canada involved remixing both music and research practices. Through a school-based leisure programme called The Beat of Boyle Street, I taught Aboriginal young people to use computers and audio software to make, pr...
Article
This paper traces the historical development of two trends in radio policy and practice, “megapower” (corporate) and “micropower” (also termed “pirate” or low power FM) broadcasting. In reaction to a flurry of deregulation and corporate consolidation, a micropower movement has recently emerged. My aim is to illustrate some of the political, social,...
Article
The purpose of this study was to determine what leisure studies students believe to be true about leisure, leisure professionals, and the body of knowledge. Leisure is commonly understood as freetime, an activity, and/or a state of mind. Leisure has also been related to developmental action. Data were collected from leisure studies majors at a Midw...
Article
A free eprint of this article is available: https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/CkraVXsg44jJ3aRTtQ9K/full The purposes of this research were to determine if agreement exists among leisure services practitioners regarding the meaning of leisure and to examine how they describe themselves and the body of knowledge related to leisure services. In addi...

Citations

... These patterns of results are perhaps indicative of the adverse conditions wrought by the pandemic heightening individuals' ambition to grow as humans amidst a global health crisis and the resulting lockdown and social restrictions that left many with empty space in their daily routine. Recently, evidence suggests that while grappling with the vicissitudes of the pandemic, individuals have developed in a multitude of ways such as learning content knowledge and skills through online classes (Srinivasan, 2020), engaging in leisure activities and practices (Lashua et al., 2021), and spending time immersed in nature (Robinson et al., 2021). Indeed, Maslow proposed that "human life will never be understood unless its highest aspirations are taken into account. ...
... The representations of space, according to Lefebvre (1991, p. 50), leave a limited margin for representational space to displace the former and achieve symbolic force; yet, the latter is capable of disrupting the expected forms of social practice in a conceived space. For instance, young people are able to reimagine or reconstruct spaces through their social interactions with peers, such as using spaces for their own priorities instead of what is expected from them (Lashua and Kelly, 2008;Sharpe, Lashua and van Ingen, 2019). ...
... 5 4 There are other kinds, also touching on leisure and contemporary politics. Some apply situationist-inspired methods, say, when arranging midnight cricket matches in London's financial district to challenge the use of urban space (see for instance Lashua & Baker, 2019). 5 Knitting and crocheting are old crafts with wide-ranging social and geographical distribution and recognized utility. ...
... It is worth remembering that (drug) policy enactment is used to practice social control on young adults in the spaces they inhabit (Gabriel et al. 2021). The liminal leisure spaces of young British-Somali men in which illicit Khat-chewing takes place are the focus of Swaine et al.'s (2018) ethnographic study 1 . Drawing on theories of social spatialisation which position spaces as sites or zones with values, representations and meanings (Shields 1991), Swaine et al. (2018) note how the young men occupied leisure spaces/times (a public stairwell is mentioned) which-being 'betwixt and between' (Turner 1995:95, Turner 1974 or hidden/visible-enmeshed both backstage and frontstage leisure practices, amounting to 'the expression of secret activities in communal settings' (Swaine et al. 2018:444) or what we might characterise as 'private-in-public'. ...
... In our opinion, Lipovetsky's thinking offers this contemporaneity, which many among us-researchers as well as practitioners-for intrinsic as well as extrinsic reasons routinely struggle to maintain or simply keep alive. Various writings increasingly bring to the fore-sometimes even from a theoretical perspective-the concepts of experience, pleasure, well-being, and immediacy as crucial elements for understanding the leisure subject and including it in our interpretations (Spracklen et al., 2017). However, in the face of these widely agreed-upon facts and societal trends, we regularly lack a certain analytical distance, and therefore there is very little room for any alternatives. ...
... Although both appear to be 'environmental' or 'natural' problems, they are socially driven" and thus demand social solutions. Some solutions centralize leisure, such as shortening the working week, as well as some form of Universal Basic Income (Lashua, 2018). Some of our authors have written about the pandemic as a vital moment of leisure to pause, to stop, and to grieve. ...
... Moreover, synthesizers, drum computers, sample libraries, and virtual instruments are nowadays widely used to produce sound, either in addition to or instead of recorded performances. These developments have blurred the distinction between the roles of composer, musician, sound engineer, and record producer (Burgess, 2013), as well as the classification of these roles as either art-oriented or craft-oriented (Lashua and Thompson, 2016). In many contemporary Popular Music genres a song or album is typically the work of a creative collective (Hennion, 1983)-or even a single individual-taking charge of all of these aspects of the music production process. ...
... Movement cultures do not respect neatly demarcated policy domains. Following Watson et al. (2016) in their discussion of the relationship between dance and physical activitythe discursive differences and disciplinary dilemmas mobilised by lifestyle and informal sport is potentially knowledge producing, and greater acknowledgement of these tensions and differences better positions us to inform policy, practice and provision. Locating sport within broader social, cultural, political, legal and economic contexts requires us to think across boundaries and to adopt more agile approaches to policy analysis. ...
... B. Fassadenbegründung) sind ein zentrales Element der Mitigationsstrategien, um den Auswirkungen des Klimawandels im urbanen Raum entgegenwirken zu können. Sie agieren multifunktional und bieten neben der Verbesserung thermischer Bedingungen und der Reduktion des gebäudespezifischen Energieverbrauchs durch natürliche Isolationseffekte[44] auch Möglichkeiten, Urban Farming zu integrieren und so neue Flächenpotenziale zu schaffen[54,55]. Auch die ökologische Wirkung der Begrünungsmaßnahmen stellt einen entscheidenden Vorteil dar. ...
... Interviews are recorded on video or audio and maps or sketches can be drawn. In the literature, researchers use mobile methods such as 'Go-Along' (Carpiano 2009;Kusenbach 2003;Merriman 2014;Spinney 2015) 'Guided Walk' (Brown et al. 2007;Aksümer 2019;Lashua and Cohen 2010), 'Commented Walks' (Layeb 2014;Thibaud 2017) or 'Walking Interviews' (Evans and Jones 2011;Battista and Manaugh 2017;Lee and Ingold 2006;Clark and Emmel 2010;Jones et al. 2008). ...