Brandy J. Baczwaski's research while affiliated with University of Mississippi and other places

Publications (5)

Article
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The purpose of this study was to systematically examine the psychometric properties of the 14-item Resilience Scale (RS-14; Wagnild, 2009a). Exploratory and confirmatory factor-analytic methods were employed, including an analysis of measurement invariance models by sex and race/ethnicity. Descriptive statistics, reliability, and validity data were...
Chapter
Disaster mental health, also known as clinical-disaster psychology, is an emerging area of interest among researchers and clinicians as it is important to understand the impact disaster events have on an individual’s mental health. Research within disaster events is necessary to allow researchers and clinicians to be better prepared for future disa...
Article
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The current study examined the impact of the Gulf Oil Spill and Hurricane Katrina, environmental attitudes, and environmental action among residents of the Mississippi Gulf Coast. The authors sought to determine if disaster impact, worry about the environment, or connection to nature was associated with environmental action following the oil spill...
Article
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This study’s primary purpose was to examine the factor structure of the 20-item Seeking of Noetic Goals (SONG) test via exploratory and confirmatory factor-analytic procedures. An additional objective was to report on the measure’s incremental validity in comparison to the Search scale of the Meaning in Life Questionnaire (MLQ), an alternative meas...
Article
Full-text available
On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil platform exploded, releasing five billion barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico over five months (referred to as the Gulf Oil Spill). This oil spill affected Gulf Coast communities, harming both sea and land wildlife, damaging the fishing industry, and destroying natural resources. In the wake of such a...

Citations

... While Schulenberg and colleagues' research was originally couched in a Franklian/logotherapeutic context (e.g., Frankl, 1959Frankl, /2006McCutcheon et al., 2020;Schulenberg et al., 2008), the importance of meaning far exceeds any one perspective, anticipating such areas as meaning-enhanced cognitive-behavioral therapy, terror management theory, positive psychology, ACT, and motivational interviewing, to name a few others. Meaning is essential to human health, well-being, and valued living, in general and related to disaster mental health (Finkelstein-Fox et al., 2020;Melton & Schulenberg, 2008;Pavlacic et al., 2021;Schulenberg, 2016Schulenberg, , 2020Schulenberg et al., 2014;Weathers et al., 2016). ...
... The results also showed a significant link between resilience and both mental health indicators. Similar to other studies, our research also found that the higher the resilience, the higher the level of mental well-being (Abolghasemi and Varaniyab 2010; Aiena et al. 2015;Cosco, Howse, and Brayne 2017;Downie et al. 2010;Hu, Zhang, and Wang 2015) and risk of depression (Bonanno, Westphal, and Mancini 2012;Catalano et al. 2011;Surzykiewicz, 2019). ...
... For example, contact with the "bugs and mud" of nature might create an aversive experience that counteracts the usually positive effect of nature, perhaps because such exposure feels threatening (see research on negative affect in later sections). The two studies appearing in this review closest to answering such questions investigated the how connectedness is affected by exposure to natural disasters-by all accounts a less than positive encounter with nature (e.g., Walters et al., 2014;Brown, 2017). While the results paint opposing pictures-in one study exposure to natural disasters was associated with increased connectedness (Walters et al., 2014) and in the other the opposite was true (Brown, 2017)-the research questions themselves are emblematic of an interest in the negative side of contact with nature. ...
... Numerous studies have shown that the sense of meaning in life is an important indicator of individuals' mental health (King and Hicks, 2021;Zhao et al., 2017). A higher level of this sense is significantly related to a higher level of happiness, self-worth, self-esteem (Boyle et al., 2010;Schulenberg et al., 2014). On the contrary, a low level of the sense of meaning in life is a direct cause of depression. ...
... More in particular, when individuals are confronted with a wide range of hazards, whether they be natural, technological, or otherwise person-made, meaning seems to be of the utmost importance. For example, in a range of studies conducted over a number of years, Schulenberg and colleagues demonstrate the importance of meaning for a range of disaster-related contexts, such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, floods, tornadoes, and most recently the COVID-19 pandemic (Aiena et al., 2015;2016;Boullion et al., 2020;Drescher et al., 2012;Dursun et al., 2016;McCutcheon et al., 2020;Schulenberg, 2016Schulenberg, , 2020Schulenberg et al., 2016;Weber et al., 2020). While no two disasters are alike, as each disaster occurs in its own unique socio-political-economic context (e.g., McCutcheon et al., 2020), it seems clear that meaning is an essential factor, one with promise and one we hope to continue studying using increasingly longitudinal methods. ...