Brandon A. Sullivan's research while affiliated with Indiana University Southeast and other places

Publications (12)

Article
Little attention has been paid to ideologically motivated tax protesters who use frivolous legal arguments as moral or legal justification for committing tax fraud and related financial crimes. These crimes have defrauded private citizens and governments and are associated with violent far-right extremism, negatively impacting public safety and sta...
Article
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Considering the steady and rapid growth of product counterfeiting and the damage it causes to society, it is important for criminology and criminal justice scholars to assist criminal justice officials, industry practitioners, and law makers in understanding the product counterfeiting problem and developing strategies to combat it. However, for res...
Article
Full-text available
Counterfeit parts in the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) supply chain threaten national security by compromising critical military operations and placing the lives of military service members at risk. With the goal of illustrating the nature of the risk as it relates to types of counterfeit parts, how they entered the supply chain, and were identi...
Article
Research on small businesses facilitating illicit markets and the efforts of nonfederal law enforcement agencies to identify these small business offenders has been scant. This exploratory study examines the illicit market for counterfeit products sold through small businesses in the State of Michigan. We used police incident reports of counterfeit...
Chapter
This chapter explores the risks and opportunities for the illicit trade in counterfeit goods. Product counterfeiting is a complex global problem that ranks among the oldest and most profitable criminal enterprises. Counterfeit products generally refer to any good or packaging containing a trademark that is indistinguishable from one registered to a...
Chapter
Although terrorism literature has grown in quantity and quality, less work has been done on financial crime activity involving those holding extreme political or religious ideological belief systems. This chapter reviews findings from an ongoing research effort identifying financial crime schemes committed by supporters of al-Qa'ida and affiliated...
Article
Full-text available
Product counterfeiting is an ongoing problem whose complexity makes it difficult to be assessed. Although many organizations have estimated its extent, their measurements often have methodological shortcomings. Brand owners are working with industry organizations to improve these measurements. In this study, we use interviews with brand owners in v...
Article
Due to its considerable negative consequences, product counterfeiting is a global problem that is a growing concern for consumers, government entities, law enforcement, and businesses. Unfortunately, current assessments of the nature and extent of the problem are largely unreliable and based on methodologies with significant limitations. This artic...
Article
Product counterfeiting crimes have detrimental effects on consumers, brand owners, public health, the economy, and even national security. Over time, as product counterfeiting crimes and the response to them have evolved, U.S. federal legislation has developed and state legislation has followed suit, but with considerable variation across the state...
Article
Product counterfeiting has received increased attention due to its economic and public health impact. Media framing of product counterfeiting shapes how the public and policymakers understand the problem. While there is a large body of literature examining crime and the media generally, empirical studies have yet to focus on the media construction...
Article
Although there is a large body of research examining how crime and criminal justice issues are presented in the news, there is no research examining the media construction of product counterfeiting and little research on financial crimes in the media. The current study fills this gap by comparing the representation of financial crimes and product c...

Citations

... While counterfeit manufacturers may employ workers, such labor is typically unregulated, low-paid, and sometimes even forced, with workers not having the same protections they enjoy in more regulated employment (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, 2019). Societies may suffer risks to national security through poorly performing military hardware, public safety through links to criminal activity (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Sullivan, Wilson, and Kinghorn, 2017), and public health through counterfeit health and safety products (Joshi, 2018). ...
... One set of researchers examined the financial crimes among members of the far-right extremist movement. Utilizing the U.S. Extremist Financial Crime Database, Sullivan et al. (2019) identified 215 schemes among 368 individual offenders. Of those 215 schemes, approximately onethird of their sample included sovereign citizens. ...
... Counterfeit and piracy are illicit businesses wherein which unlawful networks thrive through the distribution of often substandard and even dangerous goods. These illicit goods range from mild to life threatening (Eser et al., 2015: 412;Sullivan et al., 2017Sullivan et al., : 1289. In recent years, the purchase of counterfeit goods has become a global issue and threatening the global economy, with China being regarded as the leading producer of counterfeit products. ...
... Counterfeiters undermine the investments that firms make in research, development, and for meeting production and safety standards, while essentially using a firm's reputation to compete against it. Businesses and other institutions can also be unwitting purchasers of counterfeit goods and suffer harms from the poor performance of such goods; this has included military contractors who purchased counterfeit goods from suppliers (Sullivan and Wilson, 2017). Finally, larger entities such as governments, economies, and societies may all suffer from product counterfeiting. ...
... Another important area of research is to compare FRE financial crime to other types of crimes associated with other extremist ideologies. In contrast to FRE that have engaged mostly in financial crimes centered on an anti-government ideology, jihadi extremists have committed mostly monetary and material support crimes such as providing money or other resources, supplies, training, or personnel to foreign terrorist organizations or causes (Sullivan, Freilich, & Chermak, 2016). Meanwhile, we have not to date identified any financial schemes associated with far-left ideologies (e.g. ...
... • Sullivan et al. (2017) argued that there needs to be a more harmonised definition of what constitutes a counterfeit good. Agreeing on a definition that is consistent across Member States will enable better data collection and more effective study of counterfeit markets by researchers. ...
... In intelligence analysis, military science, disaster response, and criminal justice applications, estimates of the size of hidden sets can give insight into the size of a threat or guide policy responses. Analysts may seek information about the number of combatants in a conflict, military vehicles [42,43], extremists [44], terrorist plots [45,46], war casualties [47], people affected by a disaster [48], and the extent of counterfeiting [49]. ...
... This could be done by embedding specific technologies in their authentic products (Shultz & Saporito, 1996;Wald & Holleran, 2007;Yang et al., 2004), investing in education and training, and exerting a tighter control over the entire supply chain (Liu, Li, Wu, & Lai, 2005;Stevenson & Busby, 2015). Firms can collaborate with relevant stakeholders, such as governmental agencies and competitors, to share information about counterfeiting and counterfeiters, as well as influence institutions' priority list of products that should be seized (Alcácer et al., 2017;Shultz & Saporito, 1996;Wilson & Sullivan, 2016). , who interviewed the managers of large firms that have succeeded in their anti-counterfeiting activities, reported that success is driven by management support, the investment of adequate financial resources, and a deep understanding of counterfeiting as a phenomenon. ...
... To discern these and provide some context for their assessment, I employed a three-stage content analysis strategy, making inferences from systematically identifying message characteristics (Holsti, 1968). This approach, recently employed to examine media coverage of product counterfeiting (Sullivan and Chermak, 2013), provided the flexibility necessary to account for the fact that established theory underpinning the future of product counterfeiting risk does not exist yet a general framework for examining components of risk relative to ''attacks'' does. This offered a means to identify and categorize qualitative information into key themes. ...
... VM Hopping: Due to the hyper-visor complexity, the unlimited resource allocation, and its configuration flexibility on the cloud, attackers may be able to attack one VM to gain access to another one [135]. ...