Boris Jardine's research while affiliated with University of Cambridge and other places

Publications (8)

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In this book the diverse objects of the Whipple Museum of the History of Science's internationally renowned collection are brought into sharp relief by a number of highly regarded historians of science in fourteen essays. Each chapter focuses on a specific instrument or group of objects, ranging from an English medieval astrolabe to a modern agricu...
Article
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This paper explores the hoarding, collecting and occasional display of old apparatus in new laboratories. The first section uses a 1936 exhibition of Cambridge's scientific relics as a jumping-off point to survey the range of historical practices in the various Cambridge laboratories. This panoramic approach is intended to show the variety and comp...
Chapter
A History of 1930s British Literature - edited by Benjamin Kohlmann May 2019
Article
The complete system of knowledge is a standard trope of science fiction, a techno-utopian dream and an aesthetic ideal. It is Solomon’s House, the Encyclopaedia and the Museum. It is also an ideology – of Enlightenment, High Modernism and absolute governance. Far from ending the dream of a total archive, 20th-century positivist rationality brought...
Article
British social survey movement ‘Mass-Observation’ (M-O) was founded in 1937 by a poet, a film-maker and an ornithologist. It purported to offer a new kind of sociology – one informed by surrealism and working with a ‘mass’ of Observers recording day-to-day interactions. Various commentators have debated the importance and precise identity of M-O in...
Article
This paper offers a re-interpretation of the development of practical mathematics in Elizabethan England, placing artisanal know-how and the materials of the discipline at the heart of analysis, and bringing attention to Tudor economic policy by way of historical context. A major new source for the early instrument trade is presented: a manuscript...
Article
Paper occupies a special place in histories of knowledge. It is the substrate of communication, the stuff of archives, the bearer of marks that make worlds. For the early-modern period in particular we now have a wealth of studies of 'paper tools', of the ways in which archives were assembled and put to use, of the making of lists and transcribing...

Citations

... This is why M-O was only ever supposed to be one part of a broader set of projects, including the Social Relations of Science movement, holistic biomedical institutions like the Pioneer Health Centre, Peckham, research into industrial psychology and planning and policy organisations like Political and Economic Planning. Common factors amongst these included an emphasis on data-gathering as a scientific and corporate practice, and a utopian pragmatics founded on organic metaphors of growth and interconnection (Jardine, 2019). ...
... 2. At the same time as archives involve exclusion of materials and memories, they are marked by the dual promise of infinity and totality. For more about the concept of total archives, see Jardine and Drage (2018). ...
... In this paper, we seek to address both problems (so far as that is possible within the word limit). Regarding the latter problem -the aesthetic problem of representation -we take lessons from histories of the original MO (Highmore, 2002;Hubble, 2010;Jardine, 2018;Marcus, 2001). The founders of MO in the late 1930s were influenced by Surrealism and sought to represent everyday life using aesthetic techniques from surrealist poetry, painting, film, and theatre. ...
... For instance, historians have paid more attention to the physical spaces where chymistry was performed, the laboratories and workshops in which scholarly and artisanal cultures met and epistemic exchanges between the two took place (Shapin and Shaffer 1985;Hannaway 1986;Crosland 2005;Klein 2008;Anderson 2013;Saunders et al 2013;Dupré 2014). Equally, the study of scientific instruments, laboratory apparatus and other objects from chymistry-related contexts have acquired more and more relevance among historians (Daston 2000;Taub 2011;Jardine 2018). One of the tenets of the scholar and craftsman thesis was the role of "superior artisans", individuals who had the necessary education to actually make the encounter happen by incorporating the largely uncodified and non-verbal knowledge of crafts into a natural philosophical system (Zilsel 1942;Rossi 2009;Olschki 1919Olschki -1927. ...
... Papermaking reached Samarkand, Baghdad (793 AD), Damascus, Cairo (900 AD), and Fez (1100 AD). From there it spread to Spain in 1151 AD then to France in 1348 AD and later on to Germany in 1390 AD (Kaur et al. 2017, Jardine 2017. In 1450, the discovery of printing by movable sort in Germany caused an abundant reduction in the price of book production. ...