Beverley McCulloch's research while affiliated with University of Auckland and other places

Publications (4)

Article
Osteocalcin (the 6,000 dalton Mr gamma-carboxyglutamate-containing protein of bone) has been detected in acid extracts of bones of the extinct class of New Zealand ratite birds, the moas, using a radioimmunoassay for sheep osteocalcin. The immunoreactive osteocalcin of the extracts of two of these bones (the fibulae from two specimens of Pachyornis...
Article
Radiocarbon dates are presented for fourteen South Island and three North Island, New Zealand, natural deposits of bird remains, principally those of moas (Dinornithiformes).

Citations

... Hieraaetus moorei was first described as an active predator [18], but Haast himself later noted that its beak exhibited vulturine features [19], as have more recent authors [3,20] who also observed vulture-like similarities in beak shape, based on two-dimensional morphometrics, as well as the presence of bone scrolls around the nostrils. Through much of the twentieth century, the argument that it was largely a carrion feeder was widely held [21]. However, most of the more recent studies have supported the predator hypothesis [22][23][24]. ...
... A bone probably from Anomalopteryx sp. was recovered from a cooking site amongst burnt stone and charcoal at Rangitumau near Masterton (Cairns 1959), and an unidentified bone probably associated with oven stones was found near Arawhata Stream (Scarlett 1962). Caves near Martinborough have yielded a variety of bones (Yaldwin 1956(Yaldwin , 1958, which have been dated to c. 1470 yr BP (McCulloch & Trotter 1978). Brodie ( 1950) reported moa eggshell and bones from Holocene sand dunes at Castlepoint, including an entire skeleton plus other bones oi Euryapteryx gravis (=E. ...
... [1,3,[10][11][12][13] Additionally, because of its close association with hydroxyapatite, size, and acidity, it has been hypothesized to persist into the deep time making it a prime target for paleontological and archaeological investigations. [14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25] It has also been a target for fossil remains because the N-terminal residues are variable providing greater phylogenetically informative sequences than other commonly preserved proteins in bone (e.g., collagen I). [18] It is a small protein (~5800 Da) with three vitamin K dependent γ-carboxylated glutamic acid residues (Gla) at positions 17, 21, and 24 [26] that allow for direct binding to calcium in hydroxyapatite. ...