Bernd Hufnagl's research while affiliated with University Radiology and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Magnetic field changes were recorded while 20 healthy young participants performed a deep face encoding task. Some of the faces were randomly associated with a simultaneously presented odor. A recognition test, during which all faces were presented again together with the same number of new faces, followed. The task was to discriminate between repe...
Article
Using a whole-cortex magnetoencephalograph, magnetic field changes were recorded to describe brain activities related to simultaneous visual and olfactory processing and to detect odor-related influences on verbal information processing. Words had to be either shallowly (nonsemantic) or deeply (semantic) encoded by healthy young subjects, each of t...
Article
The present study was meant to distinguish between unconscious and conscious olfactory information processing and to investigate the influence of olfaction on word information processing. Magnetic field changes were recorded in healthy young participants during deep encoding of visually presented words whereby some of the words were randomly associ...
Article
Magnetic field recordings were made in order to describe brain processes during a word recognition experiment. We investigated 26 healthy young subjects (14 females) and focused on gender differences related to recognition performance and brain activity. From about 200 ms to 350 ms after word onset the event-related field (ERF) patterns differed si...
Article
Brain activity was measured with a whole head magnetoencephalograph (MEG) during the test phases of word recognition experiments. Healthy young subjects had to discriminate between previously presented and new words. During prior study phases two different levels of word processing were provided according to two different kinds of instructions (sha...
Article
Using a 143-channel whole-head magnetoencephalograph (MEG) we recorded the temporal changes of brain activity from 26 healthy young subjects (14 females) related to shallow perceptual and deep semantic word encoding. During subsequent recognition tests, the subjects had to recognize the previously encoded words which were interspersed with new word...

Citations

... Olfactory loss in COVID-19 patients is usually severe and sudden, but it is temporary in most patients, although 10.6% of patients do not recover within one month [13]. Hufnagl et al. established negative effects in the enjoyment of food, personal hygiene, matters of safety, mood, sexual life and social interaction in patients with smell loss [14]. Therefore, coping strategies have played a key role in dealing with ordinary disorders and problems, mainly in patients with loss of smell, since treatment is limited or non-existent [15]. ...
... With respect to semantic processing, if the interpretation of our results is correct, it seems to partially disagree with Tarkiainen, et al. [24], who-using MEG-attributed semantic processing to a time point of about 150 ms post stimulus onset. Our results, while comparing semantic with non-semantic stimuli, point to semantic processing taking place at a later time point, marked at around 280 ms, which matches another MEG study by Walla et al. [31], where a time window from 200 ms to 500 ms post-stimulus onset was identified as reflecting semantic processing. ...
... That is the intention of the research described here. This builds on indications of the general sensitivity of MEG measures to memory processes, which has been accomplished via assessment of ERFs (Tendolkar et al., 2000;Walla et al., 1999;Walla, Hufnagl, Lindinger, Deecke, Imhof, et al., 2001), time-frequency plots (Düzel et al., 2003;Düzel, Habib, Guderian, & Heinze, 2004;Guderian & Düzel, 2005;Neufang, Heinze, & Düzel, 2006), and/or data transformed into source space (Dhond, Witzel, Dale, & Halgren, 2005;Gonsalves, Kahn, Curran, Norman, & Wagner, 2005;Lee, Simos, Sawrie, Martin, & Knowlton, 2005;Seibert, Hagler, & Brewer, 2011). ...
... Additionally, a lack of differences was repeatedly shown for semantic processing (Walla 2001, Baxter 2003, Chiarello 2009 and also for language comprehension (Frost 1999), naming , and lip reading (Irwin 2006). Wallentin arrives at the conclusion that, overall, the literature does not provide evidence for behavioral gender differences in language abilities (Wallentin 2009). ...
... In addition, the same researchers demonstrated that word recognition performance was significantly poorer when the odorants were presented simultaneously with the words as opposed to continuously during the encoding phase, and when semantic (deep) as opposed to non-semantic (shallow) encoding was required. These effects can be explained by a competition of processing resources in brain areas engaged in both language and odor processing (Walla et al. 2003a). ...
... With respect to piece 2 above, in accord with the notion that a given sensory stimulus may be perceived or not [and perception perhaps involving an "ignition" process (11)], it has been noted that odor stimuli, of comparable intensity, evoke different MEG signals; the MEG distributions over the brain depend on whether the odor was perceived or not, with odor perception evoking more widespread and delayed activation over timescales in the hundreds of milliseconds (12). ...
... Rubin et al. (2012) reported that inhaling stress sweat enhances the neural response to neutral faces. Walla et al. (2003) used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study olfaction and face encoding in humans. Elsewhere, it has been shown that the positive emotional priming of the perception of facial affect in females is diminished in the presence of chemosensory anxiety signals (Pause et al., 2004). ...