Bernard T. Bormann's research while affiliated with University of Washington Seattle and other places

Publications (13)

Article
The field of forestry has changed substantially in the last 100 years as scientists and managers have grappled with ways to best manage forests and adapt to changing knowledge, needs, and climates. We believe a path forward may be through using an ecosystem wellbeing framework where both community and environment wellbeing must be achieved to meet...
Article
Full-text available
A fundamental question of forestry is that of species composition: which species are present, and which are not. However, traditional forest measurements needed to map species over large areas can be both time consuming and costly. In this study, we combined airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data with extensive field data from the Long-T...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This study represents a major new collaboration between two State of Washington institutions, the WA Department of Natural Resources (WADNR) and the University of Washington (UW)’s Olympic Natural Resource Center (ONRC), and other key academic and federal research agencies. This multi-agency experiment, called the Type-3 Watershed Experiment, was d...
Chapter
Close your eyes while standing in a mature forest along the North Pacific coast of North America in spring and you will smell the wet moss and feel its softness beneath your feet. You might detect the scent of a nearby cedar or hear the long and trembling song of a wren. You would sense the presence of tall and stately conifers nearby, and perhaps...
Chapter
Of all the dynamic processes in the human-forest ecosystem that determine long-term sustainability, learning and learning-based planning and decision making (adapting) are among the most important. In the framework of human-forest ecosystem sustainability (chap. 1), adaptive management is a social ecosystem process to be considered equally with eco...
Chapter
Planning for forest sustainability has been a hallmark of US national resource management, beginning with the work of several visionaries of the previous century, including Gifford Pinchot and US presidents Grover Cleveland and Theodore Roosevelt. Their efforts created the US national forests in 1905 to address concerns about sustainable, long-term...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this book we have woven a socioecological synthesis to describe how forests and communities have changed over the last two to three decades, especially in the moist coniferous forest zone of the US Pacific Northwest. Lessons have emerged from the social, physical, and biological studies of these forests, from contemporary forest resource managem...
Article
Douglas-fir equations for aboveground biomass components were developed for the Long-Term Ecosystem Productivity Study in the Siskiyou Mountains of southwestern Oregon. The equations were based on data from 32 Douglas-fir trees randomly selected via probability proportional to size from a single stand. Our equations were then compared with nationally...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in soil C and N pools following wildfire are quite varied, but there is little understanding of the causes of the variation. We examined how the legacies of prefire ecosystem structure may explain the variation in soil trajectories during the first decade following wildfire. Five years prior to wildfire in a southwestern Oregon forest domin...
Article
Full-text available
Increases in forest wildfires in western North America may affect soil properties. We determined how fire-induced soil C and N losses vary with fuels, thinning, fire type, and burn severity in a southwestern Oregon forest dominated by mature Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco]. Prefire thinning, clear-cutting, and wood...
Article
Full-text available
The 2002 Biscuit Fire burned three blocks of a large-scale, long-term, ecosystem productivity experiment in a mixed fire severity regime with an 80-11O-year fire return interval; an additional two blocks were not burned. This happenstance gives us an unprecedented opportunity to examine the effects of the fire on soil, vegetation, and woody debris....

Citations

... These limitations were addressed using cost-effective remote sensing technologies as a comprehensive and accurate measure of forest change at different spatial scales [14]. Out of the current technologies, airborne laser scanning (ALS) data featured prominently when resolving 3D vegetation structure accurately [15][16][17][18]. The use and availability of ALS data are increasing rapidly given its proven capabilities, allowing for the study of forest ecosystem dynamics [19][20][21][22]. ...
... Retention of headwater surface flows and their link to shorter-distance dispersal routes over ridgelines likely would aid persistence of these species and other biota in their assemblages. Some stream-riparian restoration and management activities may promote these conditions in concept see Table 6 in [14]; also [15,16,41], although few empirical data from headwater forest management are available at this time, suggesting that management approaches may need to be revisited as knowledge develops [95]. Prevention of streambank erosion and channel infilling from management activities would help retain headwater stream surface flow, and this could be ensured by equipment exclusion zones along streams and restricting yarding operations that drag logs across streams. ...
... Wildfires are also important in the global and regional Hg cycle through the mobilization of sequestered Hg reservoirs. Soils are important dynamic pools in the mercury cycle (Homann et al., 2015). By mobilizing mercury from relatively immobile soil and vegetation pools into the atmosphere, wildfires also have a direct impact on the emission and deposition processes of mercury (Engle et al., 2006). ...
... For our meta-analysis, which cannot address the specific mechanisms of SOC loss, we obtained SOC data for control, burned (low-vs. high-severity; Heckman et al., 2013), and harvested (lightly vs. heavily cut; some burned, some not; Homann et al., 2015) stands in the landscape affected by the Biscuit Fire. These studies offer detailed insights into factors that contributed to this historic fire and its consequences. ...
... Even in low intensity burns, the losses of ecosystem C and N can be significant (Certini, 2005;Homann et al., 2011). Although most of the studies agree unequivocally that untreated stands release more emissions to the atmosphere during a wildfire than treated stands (Restaino and Peterson, 2013), when considering the emissions derived from treatments, the relative effectiveness of fuel treatments in mitigating C losses is less clear, and highly variable (Restaino and Peterson, 2013: -33 Mg C ha -1 to +3 Mg C ha -1 ). ...
... Certaines espèces de lépidoptères, de reptiles ou d'oiseaux en dépendent pour leur alimentation et leur nidification (Swanson et al., 2011 ;Lehnert et al., 2013). L'importance des premiers stades de la succession forestière pour l'écosystème a également été démontrée en Amérique du Nord (Swanson et al., 2011 ;Bormann et al., 2015). ...
... Seemingly unrelated regression is well-suited for allometric biomass equations because it allows for dependencies between error terms of the component equations and the equations can be constrained to ensure tree components sum to total aboveground biomass [45][46][47][48]. We used the logarithmic model form, which is commonly used for tree biomass estimation [11,47,49] and appeared to fit scatterplots of our biomass data for all three species. We implemented the nonlinear model form rather than the log-log transformed linear model to avoid back-transformations and to allow for the (1) Biomass = exp(a 11 + a 12 * ln (DBH)) inclusion of component zero values for trees too small to have bole and bark biomass under our component definitions. ...