Benjamin Schwessinger's research while affiliated with Australian National University and other places

Publications (5)

Preprint
Gender equity remains a large issue in academia, with women comprising only about one fifth of professors in the US. There are many changes that can be made to increase equity, including institutional policies, cultural change and bottom-up strategies, but these can be difficult or slow to implement at a departmental level. Hiring is one area that...
Preprint
Full-text available
Gender equity remains a large issue in academia, with women comprising only about one fifth of professors in the US. There are many changes that can be made to increase equity, including institutional policies, cultural change and bottom-up strategies, but these can be difficult or slow to implement at a departmental level. Hiring is one area that...
Article
Full-text available
We disagree with Tom Sheldon’s contention that the preprint ecosystem can present a challenge to accurate and timely journalism (Nature 559, 445; 2018). Restricting when or how preprints are released risks suppressing science communication without any clear advantage to the public. When scientists and journalists follow fundamental principles for r...
Preprint
Full-text available
The timely and accurate dissemination of scientific discoveries is of utmost importance so that scientific knowledge can be advanced and applied to benefit the public. Scientists communicate amongst themselves at conferences, via journal articles, and, increasingly in the life sciences, in preprint manuscripts which have not been subject to peer re...
Preprint
Full-text available
The timely and accurate dissemination of scientific discoveries is of utmost importance so that scientific knowledge can be advanced and applied to benefit the public. Scientists communicate amongst themselves at conferences, via journal articles, and, increasingly in the life sciences, in preprint manuscripts which have not been subject to peer re...

Citations

... This can be seen in the solutions scholars and journalists have proposed to mitigate the potential risks associated with preprint media coverage, which include consulting unaffiliated experts [35], assessing study quality with a critical eye [36], and "emphasizing the preliminary nature of conclusions" [18]. Rigorous fact checking, working closely with study authors, and using independent sources to validate research findings have also been identified as important protective measures [37][38][39], as has building awareness among journalists and their audiences about the nature of preprints [3]. Although many of these recommended practices, such as fact checking or consulting unaffiliated experts, are simply "basic science journalism principles" [40], others, such as labeling papers as unreviewed or helping audiences understand the process of scholarly publishing, mark a departure from traditional journalistic practice. ...
... Rigorous fact checking, working closely with study authors, and using independent sources to validate research findings have also been identified as important protective measures [37][38][39], as has building awareness among journalists and their audiences about the nature of preprints [3]. Although many of these recommended practices, such as fact checking or consulting unaffiliated experts, are simply "basic science journalism principles" [40], others, such as labeling papers as unreviewed or helping audiences understand the process of scholarly publishing, mark a departure from traditional journalistic practice. That is, the proposed solutions for reporting on preprints represent a combination of "normal" and "post normal" activities. ...