Benita A. Blachman's research while affiliated with Syracuse University and other places

Publications (19)

Article
Full-text available
Despite data supporting the benefits of early reading interventions, there has been little evaluation of the long-term educational impact of these interventions, with most follow-up studies lasting less than two years (Suggate, 2010). This study evaluated reading outcomes more than a decade after the completion of an 8-month reading intervention us...
Article
The purpose of this study was to examine the validity evidence of first-grade Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) scores for predicting third-grade reading comprehension scores. We used the “simple view” of reading as the theoretical foundation for examining the extent to which DIBELS subtest scores predict comprehension thro...
Chapter
One of the key topics for establishing meaningful links between brain sciences and education is the development of reading. How does biology constrain learning to read? How does experience shape the development of reading skills? How does research on biology and behaviour connect to the ways that schools, teachers and parents help children learn to...
Article
Second- and 3rd-grade children with poor word-level skills were randomly assigned to 8 months of explicit instruction emphasizing the phonologic and orthographic connections in words and text-based reading or to remedial reading programs provided by the schools. At posttest, treatment children showed significantly greater gains than control childre...
Article
Full-text available
A range of neurobiological investigations shows a failure of left hemisphere posterior brain systems to function properly during reading in children and adults with reading disabilities. Such evidence of a disruption in the normal reading pathways provides a neurobiological target for reading interventions. In this study, we hypothesized that the p...
Article
Low-income, inner-city children were involved in a two-year intervention delivered in the regular classroom by regular classroom teachers to develop phonological awareness and word recognition skills. For the treatment children, an 11-week phoneme awareness program in kindergarten was followed by a first grade reading program (extended to grade 2 f...
Article
This study examined the performances of 171 children in kindergarten through second grade on 11 tasks of phonological awareness. The purpose was to assess phonological awareness skill acquisition across age and type of task. Results provided support for an ordering of tasks by difficulty, or age of mastery, as follows: rhyme, alliteration, blending...
Article
In an earlier study (Tangel & Blachman, 1992), low-income, inner-city children who received 11 weeks of instruction in kindergarten in phoneme awareness produced invented spellings at the end of kindergarten that were rated developmentally superior to those of control children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the invented and standard...
Article
Comments on the article by J. K. Torgesen et al (see record 1994-40599-001), which longitudinally investigated the relationships between phonological skill and reading ability in children assessed in kindergarten, 1st grade, and 2nd grade. Blachman contends that the consequences of the stability of phonological processing and the effects of phonol...
Article
Recent evidence suggests that training in phoneme awareness has a positive impact on beginning reading and spelling. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of instruction in phonological awareness provided in low-income, inner-city kindergarten classrooms by kindergarten teachers and their teaching assistants. Prior to the...
Article
The purpose of this study was to determine if children trained in phoneme awareness in kindergarten would differ in invented spelling from children who did not have this training. A reliable scoring system was created to evaluate the invented spelling of the kindergarten children. The children were selected from 18, all-day kindergartens in four, d...
Article
Full-text available
Recent evidence suggests that the ability to segment words into phonemes is significantly related to reading success, and that training in phoneme segmentation appears to have a positive influence on beginning reading. In this study, we evaluated the effect on reading readiness of phoneme segmentation training in kindergarten. Ninety nonreaders wit...
Article
34 kindergartners and 34 1st graders completed a series of measures including the McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities and the WRAT. Language analysis tasks (segmentation and rhyming) and rapid automatized naming tasks (objects, colors, and letters) were found to tap different components of linguistic processing in both kindergarten and 1st-grad...
Article
This study evaluates the effectiveness of a two-year educational intervention for low-income, minority children. The superior performance by the experimental group on achievement measures administered at the end of both kindergarten and first grade clearly indicates that academic success is facilitated by early educational intervention.
Article
The early detection of reading and other learning problems is of paramount importance if we are to develop appropriate educational programs before the child has experienced years of failure. Despite the proliferation of kindergarten prediction studies (Book, 1974; Eaves, Kendall, and Crichton, 1974; Feshbach, Adelman, and Fuller, 1977; Glazzard, 19...

Citations

... au vocabulaire) et la compréhension orale du langage, avec sa dimension syntaxique, notamment. De très nombreuses études ont montré que les différentes habiletés liées au niveau de lecture en primaire sont prédites par des habiletés précoces en littéracie évaluées entre 4 et 5 ans (Kim & Petscher, 2011 ;Lonigan et al., 2000 ;Munger & Blachman, 2013 ;Ozernov-Palchik et al., 2017 ;Storch & Whitehurst, 2002). En effet, dans les études longitudinales on observe de puissantes relations entre le niveau de littéracie précoce et les mesures observées en lecture et ses compétences associées plusieurs années plus tard. ...
... Yet, only a few studies investigating phonological training have a follow-up of five years or longer. These studies have been carried out before reading instruction (Byrne et al., 2000;Elbro & Petersen, 2004;Kjeldsen et al., 2014Kjeldsen et al., , 2019Partanen & Siegel, 2014), at the beginning of reading instruction (Snowling & Hulme, 2011), or when reading difficulties already are established (Blachman et al., 2014;Wolff, 2016). Kjeldsen et al. (2019) observed that long-term transfer effects to word decoding and reading comprehension were found of phonological training in kindergarten with Danish and Swedish speaking children (Elbro & Petersen, 2004; 1 3 Kjeldsen et al., 2014). ...
... It is well-accepted that PA and MA were both important for Chinese reading acquisition. PA is one category of metalinguistic development that continues to get attention as an important component of early reading abilities (Ball and Blachman, 1988). It is the ability to identify that a spoken word consists of a series of sounds, as well as to reflect on and manipulate the spoken language's subunits, phonemes and words (Tunmer et al., 1988). ...
... We chose to include this feature in our investigation because letters represent phonemes, and letter names are basically comprised of phonological sequences (Foulin, 2005). Undoubtedly, letter name knowledge and phonological sensitivity are interrelated and both are crucial for later literacy skills (Ball & Blachman, 1991;Burgess, 2002;Muter & Diethelm, 2001;Wagner et al., 1997). Accordingly, it is relevant to address the issue of the normal development of speech sounds which, later on, children learn to use to represent the letters they are learning. ...
... Invented spelling is a process by which a speller applies basic or partial conventional spelling rules for a sound representation that is auditorily perceived. As the term 'invented spelling' was coined originally or at least primarily for spelling in English, invented spelling in English captures children's phonological awareness skills at the syllable and phoneme levels (e.g., Tangel and Blachman, 1992) and often serves as a gateway for reading and spelling, integrating phonological and orthographic knowledge (Invernizzi et al., 1994;McBride-Chang, 1998;Martins and Silva, 2006;Ouellette and Sénéchal, 2008;Treiman, 2018). Children's invented spelling in English reveals the level of their understanding and creative mastery of phoneme-grapheme mapping rules (Gentry, 1982;Bear and Templeton, 1998) given the relative opaqueness of the English orthography as compared with other transparent alphabetic orthographies such as German or French. ...
... Participants performed a spelling test of familiar high-frequency regular and irregular words. Spelling performance was coded on overall accuracy, and according to its phonological approximation to the target words (Tangel & Blachman, 1995). The American third graders outperformed the other three groups, but there was no significant difference in spelling accuracy between the younger students in the Chinese, Norwegian and Kannada groups. ...
... Researchers have measured the construct of phonological awareness in many ways, such as rhyming, segmentation, blending, isolation, categorization, and manipulation (Anthony, Lonigan, Driscoll, Phillips, & Burgess, 2003;Chafouleas, Lewandowski, Smith, & Blachman, 1997;Høien et al., 1995;Lenchner, Gerber, & Routh, 1990;Schatschneider, Fletcher, Francis, Carlson, & Foorman, 2004;Schatschneider, Francis, Foorman, Fletcher, Mehta, 1999;Stanovich, Cunningham, & Cramer, 1984;Vloedgraven, & Verhoeven, 2009;Yopp, 1988). In addition, each of these ways of measuring of phonological awareness has been examined using multiple tasks. ...
... It forms the basis of the words used for communication and is a storage area for information related to speech sounds. Children with normal auditory skills spontaneously learn this information at a very early stage [5][6][7]. Phrases and words used by children are recorded in a complete (words/pencil/) or fragmented (syllables/pen/ and phonemes/p/) manner [8]. Phonological awareness skill develops as they are analyzed in more detail in the form of words, syllables, and phonemes. ...
... B. phonologische Bewusstheit) einen zusätzlichen Einfluss der Benennungsgeschwindigkeit zur Erklärung von Unterschieden in der Lesefähigkeit belegen konnten. Zudem korreliert die Benennungsgeschwindigkeit nur mäßig mit phonologischen Fähigkeiten (Blachman, 1984;Cornwall, 1992;Kirby, Pfeiffer & Parilla, 2003;Manis, Doi & Bhadha, 2000;Mayer, 2008;Parilla, Kirby & McQuarrie, 2004;Torppa, Parrila, Niemi, Lerkkanen, Poikkeus & Nurmi, 2013;Vaessen, Gerretsen & Blomert, 2009;Wimmer, 1993;Wolf et al., 2002). In einer Metaanalyse, bei der 41 Studien berücksichtigt wurden, ermittelten Swanson, Trainin, Necoechea und Hammill (2003) eine mittlere Korrelation zwischen RAN und der phonologischen Bewusstheit von r=.38 und ziehen daraus die Schlussfolgerung, dass den beiden Funktionen unterschiedliche Fähigkeiten zugrunde liegen. ...
... Phonemic awareness can be described as comprehending that language consists of various, segmented sounds that can be manipulated and combined and that the sounds are represented by letters in written language. It's based on the alphabetic principle and has a causal connection to reading ability, supported by intervention studies reporting improved spelling, word identification and general reading ability after specific instructions and practice of phonological awareness and letter-sound knowledge (Blachman et al., 2004;Denton et al., 2006;Schuele & Boudreau, 2008;Vellutino et al., 2004;Torgesen et al., 2001). Phonemic awareness is assessed in various manners. ...