Bénédicte de Boysson-Bardies's research while affiliated with Southeastern Louisiana University and other places

Publications (25)

Article
Full-text available
The first part of this study examined (Parisian) French-learning 11-month-old infants' recognition of the six definite and indefinite French articles: le, la, les, un, une, and des. The six articles were compared with pseudoarticles in the context of disyllabic or monosyllabic nouns, using the Head-turn Preference Procedure. The pseudo articles wer...
Article
Eleven-month-olds can recognize a few auditorily presented familiar words in experimental situations where no hints are given by the intonation, the situation, or the presence of possible visual referents. That is, infants of this age (and possibly somewhat younger) can recognize words based on sound patterns alone. The issue addressed in this arti...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Building a lexicon is a necessary step in the process of language acquisition. The emergence and development of vocabulary have usually been observed in naturalistic settings through their external manifestations: the first attempts at producing words, and the various signs showing that an infant comprehends words. Naturalistic approaches, however,...
Article
Wide individual differences in early word production characterize children learning the same language, but the role of specific adult input in this interchild variability is unknown. Sampling the speech of American, French, and Swedish mothers (5 in each language group) to their 1-yr-old children, this study analyzed the distribution of consonantal...
Article
Wide individual differences in early word production characterize children learning the same language, but the role of specific adult input in this interchild variability is unknown. Sampling the speech of American, French, and Swedish mothers (5 in each language group) to their 1-year-old children, this study analyzed the distribution of consonant...
Article
This experiment examines whether 11-month-old and 12-month-old infants are able to recognize familiar words in a situation yielding no extralinguistic cues. Two experiments were run to compare infants' interest for familiar words, chosen in the early productive vocabulary of young infants, against rare words infrequent in French usage. Both experim...
Article
Phonological structure may be seen as emerging in ontogeny from the combined effects of performance constraints rooted in the neuromotor and perceptual systems, individual lexical development and the influence of the particular ambient language. We review here the nature and origins of the earliest ambient language influences. Global effects within...
Chapter
Cross linguistic analyses of syllables in dissyllabic productions of infants from four different linguistic communities were used to test the role of the perceptual and selective factors in the early organisation of infants’ vocal productions. The differences in the V1V2 height relations and the favored co-ocurrences in CV associations closely refl...
Article
Three Canadian-English infants and three Parisian-French infants were filmed bi-weekly for three to five months, from the age of 0;9 or 0;11 until 1;2, at home in naturalistic interaction with a parent. Their babbled utterances were transcribed phonetically and categorized according to consonant-type and vowel-type. The contexts for each utterance...
Article
Full-text available
Differences among languages offer a way of studying the process of infant adaptation from broad initial capacities to language-specific phonetic production. We designed analyses of the distribution of consonantal place and manner categories in French, English, Japanese, and Swedish to determine (1) whether systematic differences can be found in the...
Article
Résumé On présente dans cet article une étude interculturelle des consonnes finales produites par les enfants de quatre pays différents durant la période de transition entre le babillage et l'acquisition des cinquante premiers mots. Les analyses confirment une tendance générale à produire des syllabes ouvertes en position finale, mais montrent auss...
Chapter
The title of this workshop is “Sensory-motor organization and development in infancy”. However, the problem of the perceptual-motor organization of speech wis not considered here. Why then this reluctance to consider development of speech as a form of sensory-motor organization ? The main point that has been taken as implying a distinction between...
Article
This study compares the prosodic modifications in mothers' and fathers' speech to preverbal infants in French, Italian, German, Japanese, British English, and American English. At every stage of data collection and analysis, standardized procedures were used to enhance the comparability across data sets that is essential for valid cross-language co...
Article
Full-text available
A cross-cultural investigation of the influence of target-language in babbling was carried out. 1047 vowels produced by twenty 10-month-old infants from Parisian French, London English, Hong Kong Cantonese and Algiers Arabic language backgrounds were recorded in the cities of origin and spectrally analysed. F1-F2 plots of these vowels were obtained...
Article
Full-text available
L'activite de deux muscles du larynx, le cricothyroidien et le sternohyoidien, dans la production des tons du chinois standard a ete etudiee au moyen de l'electromyographie . Des contours moyens d'activite musculaire et de frequence fondamentale ont ete obtenus pour chaque ton a partir de mesures prises sur differentes syllabes enchâssees dans une...
Chapter
Full-text available
In the past ten years, the emergence of speech in infants has been investigated in the framework of theories regarding the capacities underlying speech as part of the biological equipment of man. In particular, studies of the perceptual capacities of neonates have shown the prerequisites for speech perception to be present in infants as early as th...
Article
Samples of babbling productions of 6-, 8- and 10-month-old infants from different language backgrounds were presented to adult judges whose task was to identify the infants from their own linguistic community. The results show that certain language-specific metaphonological cues render this identification possible when the samples exhibit long and...
Article
The late babbling productions of a French child are analysed and compared with a similar study of English-speaking children. English-speaking and French children are shown to share such universal phonetic preferences as cluster reduction, final devoicing, etc. However, there are also noticeable differences which may be ascribed to corresponding dif...
Article
The temporal organization of the late babbling of a French child during the pivotal period between babbling and the production of meaningful utterances is studied. Two points are analysed: the segmental timing in terms of syllabic durations and the durations of sequences according to their intonational contours. Articulation rate in late babbling i...

Citations

... Children's differences in the perception of coarticulatory information Attention to segmental transitions, the most dynamical parts of the speech signal, is used for speech sound discrimination at the early stage of language development (e.g., Bertoncini & Boysson-Bardies, 2000;Houston & Jusczyk, 2003). However, to what extent older children use coarticulatory information for speech perception in comparison to adults remains an empirical question (reviews: Mayo, 2000;Mayo, Scobbie, Hewlett & Waters, 2003). ...
... The use of electromyography (EMG) in phonetics research dates back at least to Faaborg-Andersen and Buchthal (1956). Sagart et al. (1986) and Hallé (1994) are among the handful of EMG studies on Mandarin tones. ...
Reference: 7 - Lexical Tone
... Thus, systems of speech must be flexible enough to allow for the variant qualities, inherent both in the speech signal itself, and in the perceptual systems of listeners. What is built up by the infant in acquiring phonology, then, is a library of systematic knowledge of the relationship between auditory patterns, kinesthetic-orosensory patterns, and (for purposes of modeling) discrete target positions (Fry, 1966;Lindblom and Sundberg, 1969;Boysson-Bardies et al., 1992). ...
... Evidence collected from the first year of life reveals that speech perception and production are related, even before children utter their first words. Particularly informative was a study by de Boysson-Bardies, Sagart, Halle, and Durand (1986), which examined the long-term average spectra of preword babble from 10-month-olds whose native languages were French, Cantonese, or Algerian. When these spectra were compared to those of adults in the infants' language communities, strong language specificity in the shapes of the spectra was observed, as well as strong similarities between spectra of infants and adults from the same language backgrounds. ...
... However, in this study, vowels were categorized differently than in other studies: the vowel /ae/ was considered to be a central vowel whereas in all other studies, /ae/ was considered to be a front vowel; this difference could explain the difference in her results. The second case comes from de Boysson- Bardies (1993), who showed that coronal-front association was observed in all children in utterance-initial position, but that in second syllable position, coronals were associated with either central or back vowels in French, Swedish and Yoruba. Finally, Sussman et al. (1996) did not find a preferred trend in a longitudinal single case study of one American English-speaking child from 12 to 21 months: coronals were produced next to a variety of vowels. ...
... 46606/eajess2022v03i06.0237. et al., 2010), French, Japanese, English and Swedish (De Boysson-Bardies & Vihman, 1991). ...
... This ensured that the participants were comparable across various language-external factors that could affect phonological production ( Campbell et al., 2003). Children below 2;6 were excluded, as their production patterns may still be stabilising and input effects may not be evident (Song et al., 2012;Vihman et al., 1994). Each component of the survey is further described below. ...
... Articulatory gestures for lexical tones would involve laryngeal movements to raise and lower pitch (cricothyroid and arytenoid muscles) and possibly also to raise and lower the larynx itself, i.e., external muscles in the trachea. Laryngeal gestures may also result in voice quality changes such as breathiness and creakiness (Brunelle, Nguyên, & Nguyên, 2010;Erickson & Abramson, 2013;Erickson, 1976;Erickson, Liberman, & Niimi, 1976;Nguyen & Edmondson, 1998;Sagart, Hallé, de Boysson-Bardies, & Arabia-Guidet, 1986). However, extrapolating from PAM principles at the phonological level, we assume here that tone features are abstractions from articulatory-phonetic information. ...
... The different contrasts were maximized by the exclusive utilization of liquids as the second consonant of the onset clusters and as the coda. The choice of the vowels, and the relationships between consonants and vowels, were designed to be consistent with speech motor theory and with data for the French language (see Boysson-Bardies, 1994; Boysson-Bardies & Durand, 1991; Boysson-Bardies & Vihman, 1991; Davis & MacNeilage, 1990). We used three vowels, two high with one front (i) and one central (u, /y/), and one back central (o). ...
... FRENCH lacks lexical stress but marks phrase-final syllables with lengthening (Delattre, 1965). The consonant inventory (N = 21) and phonotactic structure are similar to that of English in terms of diversity of syllable types, but word-final consonants are far less frequent in French (66% occurrence in American English content words in child-directed speech [CDS], 25% in French: Vihman, Kay, Boysson-Bardies, Durand & Sundberg, 1994). ...